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Old 08-04-2009, 04:08 AM
 
1,158 posts, read 3,436,290 times
Reputation: 758

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Quote:
Originally Posted by PDX_LAX View Post
What do you think is in store for L.A. in the near future?

I think there are a few worrisome signs, but what effect do you think they will have on the quality of life?

1. Economics. Companies like Hilton Hotels are being drawn out of the metro area to other cities around the country that are friendlier to big businesses and offer tax incentives. This is even happening in the city's bread-and-butter: film production is being drawn to New Mexico and other places where it's cheaper to operate. From what I've learned, the aerospace industry left in the 1990's, what next?

2. Immigration. It's annoying to me that we can't come up with a definitive answer to the question of whether or not illegal immigrants hurt the economy. But from what I understand (I live in L.A. most of the year, but am not a native Angeleno) illegal immigration has wreaked havoc on the public school and health care systems in the L.A. area. What will be done about this in the future? Nothing? What are the consequences of unchecked illegal immigrants pouring into the city?

3. Water and the environment in general. Drought is already causing water shortages in the area, and I believe they have now started rationing it. Again, this seems to be a result of ridiculous overpopulation and sprawl both of which contribute to water shortages and pollution in general.

Do you think the next 50 years look promising for Los Angeles or worrisome? Feel free to discuss other areas of concern I left out.
1. The hotel industry is in a bad way right now economically, partially thanks to a glut of properties out there. In fact, property sales are so slow they can't give them away. I mean, in this economy, who can afford to stay at a Hilton anyway?

2. You are correct. And even if there is immigration reform, it will not address the damage illegal immigration has already wrought not just on L.A., but on Southern California in general. So it will largely be up to the hispanic communities to save themselves. God only knows when or if that will happen when they keep voting for incompetents like Mike Hernandez (a cokehead) and Gloria Molina. And don't even get me started on Mayor Don Juan, er, Villaraigosa ('m a Democrat, btw).

3. Correct. And Global warming will only exacerbate it.

L.A. proper is probably doomed by its ethnic politics, growing gang membership and its rapacious bureaucrats, who are bought and paid for by developers. There is still hope for Orange County and San Diego, but only if they can somehow blunt the influx of illegals and devise a judicious response to their own gang problems and the fallout from the real estate bubble. Neither of those things are on the board right now, though, in either place.
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Old 08-04-2009, 05:16 PM
 
Location: CITY OF ANGELS AND CONSTANT DANGER
5,409 posts, read 11,549,078 times
Reputation: 2251
whos mike hernandez?

Quote:
Originally Posted by RobE View Post
1. The hotel industry is in a bad way right now economically, partially thanks to a glut of properties out there. In fact, property sales are so slow they can't give them away. I mean, in this economy, who can afford to stay at a Hilton anyway?

2. You are correct. And even if there is immigration reform, it will not address the damage illegal immigration has already wrought not just on L.A., but on Southern California in general. So it will largely be up to the hispanic communities to save themselves. God only knows when or if that will happen when they keep voting for incompetents like Mike Hernandez (a cokehead) and Gloria Molina. And don't even get me started on Mayor Don Juan, er, Villaraigosa ('m a Democrat, btw).

3. Correct. And Global warming will only exacerbate it.

L.A. proper is probably doomed by its ethnic politics, growing gang membership and its rapacious bureaucrats, who are bought and paid for by developers. There is still hope for Orange County and San Diego, but only if they can somehow blunt the influx of illegals and devise a judicious response to their own gang problems and the fallout from the real estate bubble. Neither of those things are on the board right now, though, in either place.
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Old 08-04-2009, 05:41 PM
 
12,825 posts, read 20,838,867 times
Reputation: 10936
I'm starting to see cars purchased in the general LA area (Longo Toyota being the most common) up here, in increasing numbers, driven by Asian appearing drivers. Not saying there is any sort of major exodus but given the very interesting stats on race in the major counties of LA and SF conurbations, 2008 vs 2000 (IIRC) I cannot discount trends of hispanization of the Southland meanwhile Asianization of the Bay Area. It should be studied - are Asians abandoning the Southland to move north?
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Old 08-04-2009, 05:53 PM
 
Location: Mission Viejo, CA
2,498 posts, read 10,454,546 times
Reputation: 1600
Quote:
Originally Posted by BayAreaHillbilly View Post
It should be studied - are Asians abandoning the Southland to move north?
Well, I'm not sure about Los Angeles County, but Asians are actually growing at a faster rate in Orange County so I would say Asians aren't shrinking, but growing in So Cal.

http://articles.latimes.com/2008/dec...l/me-ocasian28
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Old 10-29-2009, 04:03 AM
 
41 posts, read 95,603 times
Reputation: 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by PDX_LAX View Post
What do you think is in store for L.A. in the near future?

I think there are a few worrisome signs, but what effect do you think they will have on the quality of life?

1. Economics. Companies like Hilton Hotels are being drawn out of the metro area to other cities around the country that are friendlier to big businesses and offer tax incentives. This is even happening in the city's bread-and-butter: film production is being drawn to New Mexico and other places where it's cheaper to operate. From what I've learned, the aerospace industry left in the 1990's, what next?

2. Immigration. It's annoying to me that we can't come up with a definitive answer to the question of whether or not illegal immigrants hurt the economy. But from what I understand (I live in L.A. most of the year, but am not a native Angeleno) illegal immigration has wreaked havoc on the public school and health care systems in the L.A. area. What will be done about this in the future? Nothing? What are the consequences of unchecked illegal immigrants pouring into the city?

3. Water and the environment in general. Drought is already causing water shortages in the area, and I believe they have now started rationing it. Again, this seems to be a result of ridiculous overpopulation and sprawl both of which contribute to water shortages and pollution in general.

Do you think the next 50 years look promising for Los Angeles or worrisome? Feel free to discuss other areas of concern I left out.


Overpopulation is the root to all of California's problems. Period. California is overpopulated with idiot politicians who are incapable of running this state.
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Old 10-29-2009, 06:03 AM
 
9,715 posts, read 13,623,157 times
Reputation: 3325
The San Fernando Valley is getting more Asians also. There's a whole Asian corridor along Reseda Blvd. now (mostly Korean) while the Filipinos are settling into Panorama City.

Also, Foothill Blvd. in La Crescenta/Tujunga/La Canada -- that's gaining Asian businesses too.

As for the chances of another riot: I don't see the racial tensions that existed in 1992.
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Old 11-01-2009, 12:29 PM
 
41 posts, read 95,603 times
Reputation: 39
The Asians are all moving to Orange County because of the good schools there.
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Old 07-19-2010, 11:43 AM
 
Location: Las Flores, Orange County, CA
26,345 posts, read 84,756,882 times
Reputation: 17581
Future of Los Angeles - Newsweek
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Old 07-19-2010, 12:14 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles, CA
787 posts, read 1,727,030 times
Reputation: 375
The lastest population estimates from the Calif. Dept. of Finance show that LA County GAINED population in 2009 (a VERY bad year for the local economy).

LA County Population Estimates:
1/1/2009: 10,355,053
1/1/2010: 10,441,053
Source: Ca. Dept. of Finance

I am not sure if the increase was due to Natural Increase (Births over Deaths) or Net Migration. I assume a little of both.

The current short-term projection for California as a whole is for the state to grow by another 2.1 million people by 2015.

http://www.dof.ca.gov/research/demographic/documents/P-2%20Short-term%20Statewide%20Population%20Projections.pdf (broken link)

Pretty amazing given the still very weak state and local economic conditions.
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Old 07-19-2010, 12:48 PM
 
27,383 posts, read 29,932,128 times
Reputation: 27072
Quote:
Originally Posted by PDX_LAX View Post
What do you think is in store for L.A. in the near future?


1. Economics. Companies like Hilton Hotels are being drawn out of the metro area to other cities around the country that are friendlier to big businesses and offer tax incentives. This is even happening in the city's bread-and-butter: film production is being drawn to New Mexico and other places where it's cheaper to operate. From what I've learned, the aerospace industry left in the 1990's, what next?.
I think there's no question that L.A. and California in general seems to think we can tax and regulate business to death without any ill effects. We couldn't be more wrong, but there's still a lot of denial out there.

Quote:
Originally Posted by PDX_LAX View Post
2. Immigration. It's annoying to me that we can't come up with a definitive answer to the question of whether or not illegal immigrants hurt the economy. But from what I understand (I live in L.A. most of the year, but am not a native Angeleno) illegal immigration has wreaked havoc on the public school and health care systems in the L.A. area. What will be done about this in the future? Nothing? What are the consequences of unchecked illegal immigrants pouring into the city?
It's not that there are no definitive answers. It's just that if it's an answer people don't like, they ignore it or 'spin' it. I think the evidence is overwhelming that illegal immigrants, who typically have little education, are a net drain on the tax base. But, as with anything, those who benefit (either financially, politically, or both) from illegal immigration will create a lot of spin to deflect the harsh truth.

However, I do think it's unfair to blame illegal immigrants for our health care mess. We've been blowing a lot of money on health care for a very long time, with mediocre/poor results. We need to abandon the "pills & surgery" serivce model of health care in favor of eating natural, non processed foods. Otherwise, we are going to go broke paying for all these pills and surgeries.

Quote:
Originally Posted by PDX_LAX View Post
3. Water and the environment in general. Drought is already causing water shortages in the area, and I believe they have now started rationing it. Again, this seems to be a result of ridiculous overpopulation and sprawl both of which contribute to water shortages and pollution in general.

Do you think the next 50 years look promising for Los Angeles or worrisome? Feel free to discuss other areas of concern I left out.
Around 85% of the water used in California is from agricululture. Beef and chicken use huge amounts of water. If we all ate less beef and chicken, there would be more water for residential use. This is one area where health care and the environment are interrelated issues. It turns out that eating healthy is good for both people and the environment.

Also, I believe we can find ways to use less water without noticing the difference. Better technology, and using other plants besides grass in our green areas helps a lot.

The thing I worry about most is the state's chronic lack of financial discipline and the inevitable big earthquake.
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