U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > California > Los Angeles
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-09-2009, 11:17 AM
 
Location: New Jersey
4,085 posts, read 7,843,244 times
Reputation: 2655

Advertisements

Thanks for all the awesome responses so far! I had doubts when I typed this, I thought it would be too long and not get my experience across and just drop out of sight... But I'm glad it resonated w/ so many of you!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-09-2009, 11:54 AM
 
1,158 posts, read 3,438,082 times
Reputation: 758
There are lots and lots of transplanted New York natives in the LA/OC area. When I was in high school, my next door neighbor was from Long Island and a friend of mine was born in the Bronx (moved to CA when he was in junior high). When one would go see the Yankees face off against the Angels at Anaheim Stadium through the end of the century, there would usually be more Yankees fans in the stands than those of the local club (same was true when Boston would come into town).

The way the New Yorkers I knew talked about NYC was to almost make it out as the world's largest survival contest as opposed to a real functioning city. It almost seemed a badge of honor to them that they survived it.

I'm surprised that you were able to find free parking in Hollywood. Around the clubs I used to go to in the 1970's and 1980's, it largely became permit parking only and so I stopped going.

To me, L.A. is no longer nearly as cool as it used to be. It seems to be becoming more and more dysfunctional with every passing year (thanks to that joke of a city council and the Board of Supervisors aren't much better).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-09-2009, 12:36 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
4,085 posts, read 7,843,244 times
Reputation: 2655
Quote:
Originally Posted by RobE View Post
There are lots and lots of transplanted New York natives in the LA/OC area. When I was in high school, my next door neighbor was from Long Island and a friend of mine was born in the Bronx (moved to CA when he was in junior high). When one would go see the Yankees face off against the Angels at Anaheim Stadium through the end of the century, there would usually be more Yankees fans in the stands than those of the local club (same was true when Boston would come into town).

The way the New Yorkers I knew talked about NYC was to almost make it out as the world's largest survival contest as opposed to a real functioning city. It almost seemed a badge of honor to them that they survived it.
Assuming they were in NY in the 70's and 80's, then yes, they're right, it was the world's largest survival contest more than a real functioning city. It was really bad.

The Yankees always draw a huge crowd, they have probably the biggest national following in sports. The Red Sox may have the second biggest national following. I know the Dodgers do, also, but not AS big as those two. And the Angels have a mostly local following, and still a smaller following than the Dodgers. I'm a Mets fan who is a Dodgers fan secondarily - they are pretty similar and share some history.

Speaking of the Mets and Three's Company, I went to the Mets game last Monday and Richard Kline - Larry, from Three's Co. - was there, decked out in Mets jersey and cap. They showed him on the screen and played the theme song from the show, and everyone cheered loudly for him. But that may have to do with the fact that there isn't much to cheer about the Mets lately...

Quote:
Originally Posted by RobE View Post
I'm surprised that you were able to find free parking in Hollywood. Around the clubs I used to go to in the 1970's and 1980's, it largely became permit parking only and so I stopped going.
I almost always do. But then again, our concepts of "free street parking" may be a little different. In NYC, good street parking is anywhere that you can park without paying, even if it's across town. So if I find a spot in Hollywood that's several blocks away from my destination, that's GOOD free street parking.

The other thing is that paid parking is CHEAP in Hollywood. In NYC, you won't get away with under $30 for any amount of time, unless you reserve in advance at a way out-of-the-way garage, and it will still be at least $20-something. Overall, parking in Hollywood is a dream compared to NYC., and compared to Times Square, well, if you park ANYWHERE in the vicinity of TS, you'd be lookin at $45+, with few exceptions.

Quote:
Originally Posted by RobE View Post
To me, L.A. is no longer nearly as cool as it used to be. It seems to be becoming more and more dysfunctional with every passing year (thanks to that joke of a city council and the Board of Supervisors aren't much better).
Oh well.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-09-2009, 07:57 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles (wilshire/westwood)
804 posts, read 2,202,811 times
Reputation: 377
Quote:
Originally Posted by BergenCountyJohnny View Post
I apologize in advance for how long I know this will run, but I want to express everything and hopefully shed some light on attitudes so that anyone reading this can hopefully learn something, or have their beliefs confirmed, or at least be even mildly entertained.

My background - I grew up in Northern NJ and spent my whole life in the shadow of the Big Apple. I was born in Weehawken, NJ, literally right across the Hudson. From the street on which I was born you have probably the best view of the Manhattan skyline in the whole tri-state area.

I grew up in the 70's and 80's. Most of my impressions of both NYC and L.A. were groomed through this time, as well as into my adulthood in the 90's and beyond.

At that time, NYC was, quite frankly, a filthy pit. A hell-hole. A drug and crime-infested cesspool. Times Square was a collection of rundown flophouses, porn theaters, hookers, drug dealers, and criminals. Yes, the old Broadway theaters were in the area and survived the 70's, but going to them was not a pleasant experience as it is today. I remember my cousin and her boyfriend telling of going to see the show "A Chorus Line" and taking a cab from the parking garage to the theater, and STILL they were accosted by scary individuals. Even with a cop right there, it was not easy. The cop really earned his pay (probably the theater paid the city for him to be there).

We took our school field trips there and it was no better, vagrants and other shady types accosting us in front of the museum, Empire State Building, etc. We were supposed to go to Central Park one time but it was canceled because of a spate of crime that hit the park around that time. I was mugged on my way to see "Tears for Fears" at Radio City music hall when I was 17 (I got out of it OK though, wallet intact - I guess it was an attempt rather than an actual mugging).

What we saw on TV and in movies about NYC were things like Taxi, Baretta, All in the Family, Kojak, the Honeymooners, etc. - all set in filthy, grungy, poor, dirty backdrops and starring not-so-attractive stars. And having been to NY, I didn't think any of that was out of line; it was realistic. That was my view of NY as a kid - a cesspool and pit of filth and crime, not a nice place, you didn't go there unless you absolutely had to.

But what was I watching on TV, what were the HOT TV shows? Three's Company, Charlie's Angels, CHiPs, the Brady Bunch, Emergency!, and Adam-12. Everyone was clean-cut and fresh-faced on these shows, and always cruising around the sunny, palm-tree lined streets of L.A. or in one of the beautiful suburban homes of L.A. Even Lucy & Ricky Ricardo left their small, enclosed NYC apartment for a beautiful Beverly Hills pad with a view of Palm Trees off their terrace; even that show made the move to L.A. briefly and it was portrayed in a much nicer light than NY, which hardly figured into those episodes.

L.A. was also known to me to be the home of all the game shows, like Price is Right, etc., and Disneyland, and Knott's Berry Farm and Magic Mountain. I also heard how it was not cold and snowy there, but how CA had mountains so you could go from snowy mountains to beach in one day. I heard about and saw pictures of the diverse topography of the place and wondered what it was like to see a desert. I was disappointed that where I lived, in NJ, we didn't have everything they had in California, particularly Southern CA.

As I got older, into my teens in the 80's, I got more and more tired of feeling second-rate, and I turned my dreams of living in L.A. to a dislike for L.A., along with a new-found feeling to take stock in where I'm from. I became determined to make the best of NY/NJ and I became tired of the arrogant Hollywood-star attitude given off by people like Jack Nicholson (ironically, my fellow New Jerseyan) who gloated every time he went to a Laker's game. And he didn't gloat so much about the Lakers as he did about L.A., in general. That's how I saw it, anyway. So, I created the base for my hatred of L.A. It seemed to me I'd never go there in my lifetime, anyway, it seemed so far.

I didn't have to try too much harder to hate L.A. and build up NY in the 90's, though. All of a sudden, things shifted. Hollywood became exposed as a seedy, transvestite-prostitute ridden cesspool of drugs and crime. L.A.'s gang violence became widely known to be a huge problem. Their traffic was exposed, as well as their horrible smog problems. Everyone started calling L.A. "plastic" and "glitzy" and "phony". And NY was inversely proportionate in reputation; Giuliani cleaned up the crime in the city (albeit heavy-handedly) a TV show called Seinfeld popped up and made NY look pretty good. Soon a show called Friends poppedd up and made NY look even hipper and better. I was now able to go to NY and enjoy the heck out of it and crime or danger were not a concern. Even in NJ, a rundown, crappy town called Hoboken became a nightlife destination for my co-workers and me in '90-'92 (and beyond) because it was just starting a rebirth of sorts, and continued to blossom into the gentrified, overpriced, snooty city it is today.

So by the end of the 90's, it was second nature that L.A. sucked and NY was far, far superior to L.A. And people I knew who went to L.A. confirmed for me that it was a horrible, horrible place. Many told me to not bother going, because I would just hate it anyway. Many told me it was devoid of culture, arts, and "real" or "down-to-earth" people. And I believed it, easily.

THE TURNAROUND ------

Right around 2000, my job, which had me traveling mostly to Florida, started to have me travel more around the rest of the nation. In August, 1999 it started with my first trip ever to be further west than Dallas or Chicago, and that trip was to Vegas. It was our national department meeting, and I didn't get enough time to explore. In keeping with my "the west coast sucks" attitude, I figured that I wouldn't tack on personal days to that trip, as I did often with my trips to Florida, because in my prejudiced mind, "Vegas sucks!" I figured it was basically Atlantic City but in a desert, and I decided (before going to Vegas) that A.C. was much better, and I don't want to spend a lot of time in Vegas. Of course, when I got there, I was sold on Vegas almost immediately. It blew away Atlantic City in many ways; the only thing missing was an ocean, but their pools more than made up for it.

But what also caught my attention was the signs for I-15 all over Vegas - one sign always for North saying "Salt Lake City", and the other for south saying "Los Angeles". NEVER was the idea of going to L.A. so close to reality for me. It intrigued me, despite my prejudiced hatred of L.A. But, as I mentioned earlier, I had no time on that trip, because I flew in the day of the first meetings and scheduled an early flight out after the last day of meetings. Stupid, stupid me. Luckily I had an entire half-day on that trip to go out with co-workers, but it still left me completely wanting more and to return to Vegas.

Fast-forward to Dec. 2000 - we had another week-long meeting in Vegas. Dec. was a slow month for us, so I tacked on an extra 10 days to my trip, using some vacation time, so the airfare was paid by my company. I decided I'd go to L.A., drive through it so I could say I'd been there, then drive on to San Diego which EVERYONE told me was much better than L.A. (There was one exception, one of my best friends whose opinion I regard highly, told me I'd love L.A. and that it was better than San Diego; I did have this at the back of my mind, but still went with my plans to just pass thru L.A.) I would spend a few days in San Diego, then return to Vegas for a few days since I loved it and wanted to spend more time there to finish the trip.

When our meeting was over, I spent one last night in Vegas with my remaining co-workers. The next morning, I checked out and got a rental car from McCarran airport - Dollar Rent-a-car, I'll never forget how nice the woman was to give me tips about CA and gave me a free upgrade to a small SUV. I ended up spending much of the day in Vegas (just couldn't pry myself away quickly) and hit the road around 3 PM.

I remember driving thru the desert for the first time in my life; even at night, I was stunned! I had never seen such open, flat space like that! I remember talking to my parents as I approached Barstow, at around 4:30 PM (my dad loved to live vicariously thru me on these trips, he was a travel nut like me, I got it from him). I remember hearing commercials on the one radio station I could get for Del Taco, talking about the "original" one in Barstow, which is where I stopped for a very late lunch, at a real Californian fast-food place for the first time ever! It was actually exciting for me. From Barstow, I forged ahead, down I-15, through Apple Valley and Victorville. I was already full from Del Taco so I put off my one co-worker's tip to stop at In-N-Out in Apple Valley, where he used to live (later I realized it was a chain anyway).

I did not know where I was going. I had no hotel reservations. I only knew I had relatives (most of whom I had never met) in Glendale and Burbank and other towns in the valley and the rest of the L.A. area. I wasn't planning on seeing any of my many friends or relatives on this trip though. I knew that Glendale was full of Armenians, so, being Armenian myself, I figured that would be a good, safe place where I'd have a good chance of finding a cheap room for the night. All I had was a map from the car rental agency, so I roughly knew where Glendale was, and headed there.

As soon as I hit the L.A. area, it was like I had been there before. It all looked vaguely familiar. I realized then what it was - I had seen these highways on TV and in movies. The effect was stronger in the daylight the next day, but even at night this feeling got me excited and I was re-energized heading into L.A.

I ended up in Eagle Rock, and stayed in the Best Western there. I checked in, and originally I planned to hit the hay, but I was so excited I figured I'd take a drive around. I stopped off at a small Armenian grocery/convenience store and bought a map. I also had a bite to eat in a nearby Armenian kebab place. Then I found my way to Hollywood. I drove around, wide-eyed. I was going to just drive through, thinking that Hollywood was like NY's Times Square, a HUGE tourist attraction with noplace to park except for parking garages that charge $40 or more. Then I realized that you can park ANYWHERE, on the streets, for free! So I parked just off Hollywood Blvd and walked the sidewalks, looked at the stars on the sidewalks, checked out Graumann's, and just enjoyed the beautiful evening (SO unlike the freezing cold back home!). After walking for at least an hour, I decided to head back, but found myself going up a weird road called Laurel Cyn Dr. (I wondered what "Cyn" meant for days before I found out!) I then ended up on Mulholland Dr. and was treated to surprise views of the city and the valley that were amazing!

I ended up going to bed that night still excited, but dead tired. The next day, I awoke with a head cold. That sucked. I extended my stay another night. I went out for some OJ and vitamin C, took it and slept. Later that afternoon, I took a short ride into glendale to do a little laundry. Armenian laundromat, how convenient, lol. While the laundry was going, I tried a taco stand nearby. I will never forget it. I ate these tacos and said to myself, "WOW, THESE are TACOS!" I had the "real thing" and ever since then I am spoiled and can't eat tacos in NY/NJ without realizing how inferior they are here to L.A. tacos.

Next day, I was healthier, I checked out, went to AAA in Glendale and they gave me a whole slew of maps in a great little case, plus some other AAA Southern California swag, lol. I headed down to San Diego. San Diego was awesome, I went to Tijuana one day, my hotel was right near Old Town, and it was all wonderful. But I couldn't get L.A. out of my head. I was intrigued, I wanted to see more of it. I still believed I hated L.A., though.

I ended up staying in San Diego only 3 days instead of 4, and that was going to give me 4 days in Vegas. But I changed plans. I decided to do 2 more days in L.A. I went back to L.A. and just spent time exploring Pasadena, Venice Beach, Hollywood, Beverly Hills, and all that area around mid-wilshire, etc. I went to the Mormon Temple on Santa Monica Blvd.

One of the highlights for me was going to Santa Monica and seeing where they filmed the beginning of Three's Company, which was set in SM. I walked along the top of the cliff next to Ocean Ave. It is so beautiful and wooded with huge trees. In this area was a "visitor's information booth". The elderly lady working at this booth was a life-long Santa Monican. My excitement must have come across in my voice because she took to me very kindly. I told her my favorite TV show was set in SM, and of course she knew immediately it was Three's Company. She went on to tell me how John Ritter would often come by and that he was so nice. She also had seen them film the opening scene for show, when Jack bikes by a girl and goes off the path into the sand and falls off the bike, and she told me where that was! (It is where Venice Beach meets Santa Monica Beach, on the bike path; I went and recognized it immediately!) She gave me a great little Santa Monica pin that she said she doesn't give to most people, but she wanted me to have it since I had a good appreciation for SM (based on more that we talked about than just Three's Company). So nice! I checked out the pier, and then drove up to Malibu, also.

I just spent those two days soaking in L.A. I must admit, I was ill-prepared and did NOT hit the "spots" that visitors are told to hit. Well, I hit some of them, but everything I did was random. I found out that I can cruise around L.A. and just keep discovering things by stumbling on them. The ONLY other city that interesting is NYC. I was thoroughly impressed. I stumbled onto the Grove/Farmer's Market, Hollywood, Beverly Hills (OK I sought that out), Old Town Pasadena, Griffith Park (but not the observatory on that trip), and I cruised through the Valley, which, believe it or not, was very, very interesting! I stumbled upon Pink's (but didn't wait on line), and at the time a store called Aron's used CD's, just near Pink's (I think it's gone now). I bought a Red Hot Chili Peppers CD there since they are an L.A. band, and RHCP is now my soundtrack for L.A. and the desert.

I then headed back to Vegas; I still had 2 days left to spend there, and Vegas was just incredible to explore also. But during the drive back to Vegas, as I was somewhere between Barstow and Baker, after reviewing my visit to L.A. up to that point in my head, I finally realized something - I realized that there was no way I could deny that I ABSOLUTELY LOVED my visit to L.A. I also couldn't deny that I desperately wanted to go back and see more - MUCH more! I burst out laughing at the realization; I laughed at what an ass I felt like and how I was going to look like a complete ass when I told all my friends how awesome L.A. was, because they all knew me to despise L.A. prior to that trip!!! And I didn't care! I didn't care if I looked foolish, I would gladly admit that I was stupid to pre-judge L.A. and that I couldn't' have been more WRONG about the city!

To this day, it is one of my favorite destinations. I have been back to Vegas every year since then, usually several times a year; and on at least one of those trips per year, I take a trip to L.A. I have also been lucky enough to have been sent to L.A. for work, working in Cerritos, Culver City, and Glendale.

I am now one of L.A.'s biggest cheerleaders, especially when some NY transplant hipster is bashing me for being a "B&T" (Bridge & tunnel) from NJ. I love it when some ignorant person is talking about L.A.'s supposed lack of culture or art; it gives me a great segue into telling them about LACMA, the Getty, Huntington Library, etc.

L.A. is a truly great city, and most of the L.A. bashing that goes on is based on ignorance and prejudice based on negative stereotypes spread in the media. It's really, at this point, my favorite city, and I consider it on par with NY in most things, as well as seeing how it is ahead of NY in some things.

Los Angeles is truly a great, great city!!!
I think your story is very great I love it. I wish more people would see LA the way you saw it once you visited instead of making assumptions and writing off the city as crap even though they never been. Also people seem to praise San Diego alot and it's intresting how it's even persuaded you to just pass LA and go there. I am not saying San Diego is bad it's just why do so many people all of a sudden start acting like it's better? Did you like it when you visited San Diego? Also what made your friends think it was better?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-09-2009, 08:38 PM
 
Location: Seattle
1,368 posts, read 2,993,531 times
Reputation: 1476
Quote:
Originally Posted by SF49ers View Post
That's good you like LA and all, but it's still a dump. LA is a waste of time.

Press releases - TripAdvisor

LA ranked one of the worst cities along with Detroit and Atlanta by 3,400 respondents in survey.
My friends and I often will joke that LA is perhaps the worst city in the US for tourists. Doesn't surprise me at all that a site devoted to tourism would find that tourists hate LA. It really is a tourist unfriendly city...about as unfriendly as it gets IMO. The thing is that people who live here don't really care too much if tourists like the city and they don't really care about what people who don't live in LA think about the city. To most of us we like living here and the city speaks for itself. If you like it, great, come here. If you don't, stop complaining and go home.

That said part of me kind of hopes people visit and hate it because there's plenty of people living here and quite honestly Southern California doesn't really need more people. It's a great city but I will say it takes a little while before you "get it" and understand why. I think the OP did an excellent job at explaining it to a certain degree. He also approached his initial visits to the city in a really great way which probably contributed to his conclusion of really enjoying Los Angeles.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-09-2009, 09:25 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles (wilshire/westwood)
804 posts, read 2,202,811 times
Reputation: 377
Quote:
Originally Posted by drshang View Post
My friends and I often will joke that LA is perhaps the worst city in the US for tourists. Doesn't surprise me at all that a site devoted to tourism would find that tourists hate LA. It really is a tourist unfriendly city...about as unfriendly as it gets IMO. The thing is that people who live here don't really care too much if tourists like the city and they don't really care about what people who don't live in LA think about the city. To most of us we like living here and the city speaks for itself. If you like it, great, come here. If you don't, stop complaining and go home.

That said part of me kind of hopes people visit and hate it because there's plenty of people living here and quite honestly Southern California doesn't really need more people. It's a great city but I will say it takes a little while before you "get it" and understand why. I think the OP did an excellent job at explaining it to a certain degree. He also approached his initial visits to the city in a really great way which probably contributed to his conclusion of really enjoying Los Angeles.
wow so you base your facts off of some stupid website anyone hardly see? Dude LA is a great tourist place. When MJ died tourist were all over the place.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-09-2009, 09:29 PM
 
Location: los angeles/florida
485 posts, read 1,557,751 times
Reputation: 262
I agree that L.A. is a great city - but only to visit. After all of my years in between FL and L.A., I have realized that L.A. would an awesome place to spend a vacation - like the OP did. That way you can leave just as it gets too overwhelming and frustrating.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-09-2009, 09:56 PM
 
0 posts, read 1,414,956 times
Reputation: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by LASam View Post
I choose to believe people vote with their feet... and the 17 million people living in the metro area apparently don't agree with the 3,400 people in your survey.
And how would you explain the large metro population of Detroit? Or Dallas? None of them are particularly fabulous are they?

People move where the opportunities are and LA's golden days (booming economy, lots of land) have long and past. Large amounts of illegals helped the population too. Are you oblivious to the population trends nowadays? Hint: Massive exodus out of LA.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-09-2009, 10:02 PM
 
1,627 posts, read 2,813,623 times
Reputation: 2059
Thank you, Johnny for a well written essay about your love for Los Angeles. I made a mistake and moved away 16 years ago, can't afford to move back. My heart will always be in California.

I so enjoyed reading your post. Superb writing skills. Thank you!!!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-09-2009, 10:53 PM
 
Location: NYC
1,158 posts, read 3,269,294 times
Reputation: 1085
Quote:
Originally Posted by drshang View Post
My friends and I often will joke that LA is perhaps the worst city in the US for tourists. Doesn't surprise me at all that a site devoted to tourism would find that tourists hate LA.
Tourists in general never see the real LA. They stay at hotels in Universal Studios, go out to eat at U-Wink at Hollywood/Highland, take a bus tour of the "star homes", walk around Rodeo Drive, and top it off with a studio tour. They don't visit Koreatown, Little Tokyo, Santee Alley, Silver Lake, or Los Feliz. They see the Santa Monica Pier but skip over Main Street; they stroll the Venice Boardwalk, but don't realize the canals and Abbot Kinney are only a few blocks away. They seek out Pink's hot dogs, but how many go to El Tepeyac in East LA? I wonder how many out-of-towners have ever even heard of the Huntington?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2020 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > California > Los Angeles
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:36 PM.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top