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Old 07-02-2010, 07:49 AM
 
268 posts, read 661,848 times
Reputation: 247

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KINDA angry, but kinda right. Dead right in a lot of parts. But further back, it IS the government that
is to blame for the actual raping of LA. The government specified how much royalty would be paid to
the state for each barrel of oil, and it was set ridiculously low, the lowest in the 50 states.
But you know this. It would be interesting to see how exactly the flight of all of the oil people
would go.
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Old 07-03-2010, 12:42 AM
 
Location: Youngsville, LA
431 posts, read 966,058 times
Reputation: 203
Whether you trust Wikipedia, or not, here's (part of) their write up regarding our federal government's response.

International governments

Three days after the oil spill began, the Netherlands offered to donate the use of ships equipped to handle very large scale spills.[262]

The Netherlands also offered to prepare a contingency plan to protect Louisiana marshlands with sand barriers and a Dutch research institute developed a strategy to begin building 60-mile-long (100 km) dikes within three weeks. According to a Geert Visser, Dutch Consul-General, the U.S. government responded to the Dutch offer with "Thanks for your help, but at the moment we can manage ourselves", despite BP's desire to bring in the Dutch equipment.[262][263] US regulations require that oil-contaminated water must be stored on board in US waters. The Dutch vessels continuously extract the majority of the oil, but the water that returns to the ocean does not comply with the U.S. standard. Dutch officials have criticized the requirement, as it requires many additional trips to on-shore storage facilities. Spill Response Group head Wierd Koops said, "you have to get as much oil as possible into the storage tanks and as little water as possible. So we pump the water, which contains drops of oil, back overboard"[264] Admiral Allen explained on June 11, "We have skimmed, to date, about 18 million gallons of oily water--the oil has to be decanted from that [and] our yield is usually somewhere around 10% or 15% on that". The US later relaxed its requirements and took the Dutch up on part of their offer, airlifting Dutch equipment to the Gulf and retrofitting it to U.S. vessels, where as of June 10, it had not yet entered service.[262] To avoid using Dutch ships and workers, the U.S. government asked them to train American workers to build the sand berms. According to Floris Van Hovell, a Dutch spokesman, Dutch dredging ships could complete the Louisiana berms twice as fast as the U.S. companies.[265]

As of May 6, the United Nations and fourteen countries had offered assistance. The U.S. government declined the offers, with a State Department email to reporters stating "there is no need right now that the U.S. cannot meet." The countries offering help were Canada, Croatia, France, Germany, Iran, Ireland, Mexico, the Netherlands, Norway, Romania, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom.[266][267]

On June 14 Chris Huhne, the U.K. Secretary of State for the Department of Energy and Climate Change, made a formal statement to the House of Commons, expressing sympathy to those affected, that the environmental consequences must take priority and that the U.K. Government would remain focused on practical measures to achieve this, including offering dispersants.[268] On June 21 Iran's Revolutionary Guards offered assistance to contain the oil spill.[269]

That same day, U.S. spokesman P.J. Crowley said the U.S. had received 21 aid offers from 17 countries and four international groups. "We are maintaining contact with these countries, we are grateful for the offers, and we will take them up on these offers."[270] On June 19, the Coast Guard actively requested skimming boats and equipment from the Netherlands, Norway, France, and Spain.[263] By June 25, the U.S. State Department listed 70 assistance offers from 23 countries, and indicated that 8 had been accepted.[271] On June 29 the State Department accepted 22 offers of assistance from 12 countries and international bodies, including two high speed skimmers and fire containment boom from Japan.[272]

A month after the French foreign minister volunteered a fleet of private oil skimming boats, the owner met with BP and Coast Guard officials to present the idea. Weeks later, in late June, a private contractor in Florida purchased 9 of them.[273]

The U.S. Jones Act prohibits the use of foreign ships and foreign crews in port-to-port shipping and within the three-mile limit.[273][263] Initially, foreign-flagged boats stayed outside the limit and did not transport oil, exempting them from the Act. Allen states, "While we have not seen any need to waive the Jones Act as part of this historic response, we continue to prepare for all possible scenarios....Should any waivers be needed, we are prepared to process them as quickly as possible to allow vital spill response activities being undertaken by foreign-flagged vessels to continue without delay." According to the spill response center, six vessels have now applied for waivers. As of late June, none had been granted.[273]

Source.

I work directly in the oil industry. And no, I've YET to hear even ONE HINT from any one of my colleagues that the government is to blame. And quite frankly, I seriously doubt any one of you that has made such a wild assumption has ever actually heard such a claim.

BP is to blame. Are we clear on that so far?

Governmental HELP in the RESPONSE is all that's being requested, as well as from anyone else who happens to be offering. That's the source of contention.

Has the US government actively done all it can within it's power to mitigate the damage to our shores, thus protecting sensitive wildlife habitats and fisheries? Beaches, waterways?

Or should we leave this all to BP?

Last edited by JimLFT; 07-03-2010 at 02:03 AM..
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Old 07-04-2010, 07:27 AM
 
Location: Lafayette, La
2,047 posts, read 4,691,133 times
Reputation: 1437
all I know is, this isnt the first time Louisiana has turned down help from the Dutch. Nobody is more experienced in aquatic control and disaster prevention than the Dutch, with their long history of **** building and flood control. I think its about time we stopped trying to save money and started listening.
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Old 07-04-2010, 11:06 PM
 
1,347 posts, read 2,054,658 times
Reputation: 945
LOUISIANA didn't turn down anything.

The FEDS are the roadblock to getting anything done.
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Old 07-05-2010, 01:04 PM
 
6 posts, read 14,731 times
Reputation: 15
BP is to blame - PERIOD! Look at their past safety records! The did a shoddy job on that well just to save money! They not only killed the 11 people on that rig, but thousands of others due to the oil that is STILL spewing into the gulf! Now the federal government is envolved, that will be an even bigger disaster!
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Old 07-06-2010, 02:07 PM
 
549 posts, read 1,907,241 times
Reputation: 758
Quote:
Originally Posted by BradfromNO View Post
it IS the government that
is to blame for the actual raping of LA.
Doesn't anyone remember former Vice President Dick Cheney's secret meetings with with oil company executives?

Doesn't anyone remember President Ronald Reagan said "the 9 scariest words in the English language are - I'm from the government and I'm here to help?"

He, the Bushes, and the GOP decimated regulatory agencies for everything from the environment to education. Bubba ate that cr*p with a spoon, even loved Sarah Palin saying "drill baby drill." Now look at the mess they've made of the Gulf coast, the economy, and everything in America they touch.
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Old 07-06-2010, 03:35 PM
 
44 posts, read 221,689 times
Reputation: 49
I have not read this entire thread due to time constraints, but are folks on the Gulf Coast concerned about the huge amount of methane gas and benzene in the atmosphere? In addition to the methane gas and benzene associated with the oil, I have read a lot of news reports about the toxicity of the crude oil being mixed with the dispersant Corexit 9500. The dispersant Corexit 9500 is a VERY DANGEROUS chemical that BP is using, and it has been proven ineffective when compared with other methods of oil spill cleanup. From what I have read, Corexit 9500 doesn't have an odor, so a person can breathe this chemical and have lung damage without realizing it until they are sick.

The chemicals in the atmosphere would definitely concern me. I've seen reports of people on the Gulf with really bad respiratory problems after being on the cleanup crews. How do the Gulf folks feel about the toxicity involved in this oil disaster? Has anyone had breathing problems/coughing/watery eyes due to what is getting into the atmosphere?
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Old 07-06-2010, 06:06 PM
 
Location: Baton Rouge
1,734 posts, read 5,160,665 times
Reputation: 655
Quote:
Originally Posted by SacalaitWhisperer View Post

What hypocrites. The Oil industry has been raping Louisiana since day one and the citizens are more worried about their jobs than their own freakin planet.
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Old 07-11-2010, 02:46 PM
 
Location: H-town, TX.
3,496 posts, read 6,046,399 times
Reputation: 2195
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dixie Dawg View Post
I have not read this entire thread due to time constraints, but are folks on the Gulf Coast concerned about the huge amount of methane gas and benzene in the atmosphere? In addition to the methane gas and benzene associated with the oil, I have read a lot of news reports about the toxicity of the crude oil being mixed with the dispersant Corexit 9500. The dispersant Corexit 9500 is a VERY DANGEROUS chemical that BP is using, and it has been proven ineffective when compared with other methods of oil spill cleanup. From what I have read, Corexit 9500 doesn't have an odor, so a person can breathe this chemical and have lung damage without realizing it until they are sick.

The chemicals in the atmosphere would definitely concern me. I've seen reports of people on the Gulf with really bad respiratory problems after being on the cleanup crews. How do the Gulf folks feel about the toxicity involved in this oil disaster? Has anyone had breathing problems/coughing/watery eyes due to what is getting into the atmosphere?

Well, I seriously doubt you'll get that kind of exposure without being anywhere away from the source of dispersion.

Corexit 9500 -- Material Safety Data Sheet -- Gulf Oil Dispersant


I wouldn't use that in my everyday diet, no doubt, but let's not go overboard.

Besides, if you are that concerned, here you go:

osha oil spill - Google Search
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Old 07-11-2010, 10:02 PM
 
1,373 posts, read 2,430,311 times
Reputation: 1043
OK lets face it, this disaster is so large now it will take decades to ever get back anywhere close to what we had before. Just keep on keepin on,but hey why can't the congress and the president get together and say add 10 cents to each barrel of oil imported or drilled in this country and 10 cents to any refined gas that's imported to this country, then use the money to build real recovery vessels(and make them build them in the usa with us steel). In say a year you'd have 1,000's of real scimmers that could be on stand by to respond to a real disaster like this or the valdez. Ah forget it, that would put to many people to work and keep us from poisioning our environment, lets jus keep our 3rd world additude and muddle threw this. What a freaken disaster.
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