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Old 11-13-2010, 11:32 AM
 
Location: Monroe!
430 posts, read 335,460 times
Reputation: 216

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Quote:
Originally Posted by mezzogirl View Post
Just something I wanted to add...
There seem to be several threads on the Louisiana boards where people are complaining about LA not being progressive enough or not being modern. Most of the threads then compare one of LA's cities to some city in another part of the US that has undergone major renovation and restructuring in their urban planning. Then you know what comes next...if only LA would do this or do that and why aren't they creating this, etc etc.
I can tell you first hand that those towns modernize their cities with little thought of historic preservation. It costs the city too much to save old structures, so they tear them down and rebuild something of the "essence," thus eliminating the original identity of that place. Why do you think there are so many threads on city data that start with "remember back when..."? Imagine if someone wanted to tear down the old historic courthouse in the middle of your town because it costed to much to maintain and it wasn't "green" enough? This kind of stuff if happening all over the US in efforts to reurbanize towns. I am fine with the reurbanization/walkability concept in general, but not at the detriment of historic structures that define a town. If Louisiana wants to modernize, it is going to have to take a completely different path than other states. Louisianians certainly have something special and unique and it would be a shame to throw out those things in order to "sell" it to outsiders.
Just sayin, that's all.
So what do you suggest? I am very disappointed at Lake Charles because of that. They almost have no historic feel to it.....too much modern progress.

Hmmm its a such thing as complimenting those things, in which New Orleans has as well and Natchitoches. Maybe a few modern elements to enhance the old. There's this old building in Monroe at the foot of the bridge that's has great architecture, its a great piece of history. But to compliment it, there's a new building across the street that mimics the old building except with modern element of the present day.

I'm still waiting on a water way transportation system with all thes rivers and bayous.

We don't necessarily need to follow other states, but I think we need some innovation of some sort.
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Old 11-13-2010, 11:58 AM
 
Location: Kennesaw, GA
167 posts, read 778,484 times
Reputation: 216
Well, I feel it will be a city by city, town by town sorta thing. As our culture becomes more desensitized to old things and historical value, it will be harder to sell the preservation ideas to the general public. It will most likely be a small group of private benefactors who will have to step up and get the process underway. Your average personal is a visual learner. Once they see progress in the right direction, they are more inclined to jump in and become a part of things. I am going to use Shreveport as an exmaple here, because I am somewhat familiar with what is going on there.
Shreveport has a beautiful historic district called the Highlands, because it is literally the highland west of the Red River. It was the first real suburb outside of the S'Port downtown. The houses are a mix of Victorians, bungalows, tudor revivals and American foursquares. Once upon a time, there were streetcars that serviced the neighborhoods (even before streetcars in NOLA!). So here we are in 2010, and white flight/suburban sprawl/economic blight/crime or whatever you want to call it, has afflicted that area. What a waste!! Shreveport is still building subdivisions further and further out. There is a small movement that is restoring the older homes of Highland on their own accord without any incentive from the city. Some blocks and streets have become very desirable, as you can do a tax search and see the jumps in property values. Then there are some streets with sketchy activity and derelict mansions falling in on themselves. Your average Shreveport citizen could care less about these places, because they are so displaced from those neighborhoods. They don't want to pay a dollar towards any rehab of historical structures. Plus, many people in S'port are natives who grew up hearing that Highlands was the "bad" neighborhood where the "bad" people live. So the key will be changing the mentality of the locals and making them feel like Highlands is part of their town and valuable to the integrity of the city. How to do this? Lots of accessbility. I noticed that Highland puts on some festivals and parades. They need to be publicized as much as possible! Once natives start driving through what they always perceived as the "bad" part of town and start to see all the improvements, they may become more sympathetic to restoration efforts.
Okay, so I won't write a novel, but, I think LA towns would have to approach these projects carefully. I think it would take a collaborative effort to capitalize on the things that make a certain town unique and just go with it. I love LLegend's thoughts about boat transportation through Monroe. What a neat thing for tourists and local alike to enjoy! I also like the mirror imaging of older buildings with new architecture. I think it also is wise to repurpose old city structures. If the old post office from 1890 isn't practical as a post office anymore, why not convert it to a daycare for people who work in the business district or an amazing restaurant? Wow, the possibilities are endless.
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Old 11-18-2010, 02:51 PM
 
1 posts, read 1,150 times
Reputation: 13
Default South Louisiana All The Way!!!!

I would be honest and tell them to stay far away from North Louisiana. I currently live in Shreveport and counting the days till I leave. I have lived in both north & south LA; also in other parts of the country including California; Vegas; & New York. I have never lived in a place (Shreveport) that is so behind in everything; the people here are the most racist; close minded; and ignorant people I have ever dealt with. There are no job opportunities here unless you want to work in the service industry; the food here is awful; and the people here are terribly boring. My job is to help relocate families into a new homes so I deal with people from all areas; the only people that like north LA are the people that are from here and have never left so they really do not know any different. People from out of state feel as if they have stepped into a time warp. I would sell southern LA as the people there are the friendliest people you will ever meet; will not judge you even if you have blue hair; and very loyal. Southern LA has more job opportunities and room for job growth and it is up to speed with the rest of the country. And if nothing else the food is well worth it.
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Old 11-18-2010, 05:21 PM
 
Location: Denver
14,244 posts, read 20,648,652 times
Reputation: 9066
I personally loved Shreveport when I was there...
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Old 11-19-2010, 02:45 AM
 
Location: Monroe!
430 posts, read 335,460 times
Reputation: 216
Honestly, I'm from north Louisiana and even I have my issues about shreveport. I would have to disagree with you on the jobs, they are certainly plentiful, but.....The people in Shreveport are different. Of all of Louisiana, Shreveport seems to be the most distant from Louisiana culture and I blame that on the Texas influence. But the city has its perks and its a powerhouse that benefit the states tremendously. So if you were to sell Louisiana to new residents by way of Shreveport, try to speak as little as possible about traditional Louisiana because you are not gonna get it in Shreveport , Tx....I mean Shreveport, La. I love shreveport though but not for the Louisianan relations.
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Old 12-19-2010, 02:12 PM
 
Location: Southwest Louisiana
2,903 posts, read 2,619,648 times
Reputation: 843
The food, the culture, the mixture of heritages, the architecture, the recreation, the low cost of living.
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Old 12-20-2010, 09:59 PM
 
Location: Southwest Louisiana
2,903 posts, read 2,619,648 times
Reputation: 843
Quote:
Originally Posted by LOUISIANA'SLEGEND View Post
So what do you suggest? I am very disappointed at Lake Charles because of that. They almost have no historic feel to it.....too much modern progress.

Hmmm its a such thing as complimenting those things, in which New Orleans has as well and Natchitoches. Maybe a few modern elements to enhance the old. There's this old building in Monroe at the foot of the bridge that's has great architecture, its a great piece of history. But to compliment it, there's a new building across the street that mimics the old building except with modern element of the present day.

I'm still waiting on a water way transportation system with all thes rivers and bayous.

We don't necessarily need to follow other states, but I think we need some innovation of some sort.
I am not sure if you've actually been through Lake Charles (seriously, a map will only show you so much), but downtown does have a few historic buildings such as the 1911 city hall now being used for art exhibits, the old charleston hotel, which is now used for are exhibits and banquets, on the upper floors it's residences and offices. Also Central School, Immaculate Conception Cathedral, the old Calcasieu Marine Buiding across from pujo street cafe. There are a few historic landmarks in the downtown area. But in 1910 was a fire that destroyed much of city, thus much of it had to be rebuilt. Then during white flight, some historic buildings such as the old majestic hotel were demolished to make room for parking space. So alot of the parking spaces you see downtown are where former buildings stood.

Also ride through the chapentier historic district and margaret place historic district. However yes, there are town homes popping up in the latter (and other places in this city)

I also thought you might like to look at these postcards
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Old 12-20-2010, 10:04 PM
 
Location: NC, USA
7,088 posts, read 13,357,765 times
Reputation: 3987
How would you sell Louisiana to new residents?


one quarter of an acre plot at a time.
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