U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Louisiana
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 02-02-2008, 04:47 PM
 
Location: Bastrop La
14 posts, read 80,747 times
Reputation: 11

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by sonjarrn View Post
People in South Louisiana are usually Cajuns, Creoles or Coonasses. I have cousins in Lake Charles and Hackberry and we call them Coonasses.. Don't know where that word originated but thats what they are called. People of the Northern region of Louisiana are a little different in lifestyles and accent when speaking,, like two different states. The North are more country and some call themselves rednecks. We are all Louisianians and our hospitality to our fellow Americans is well, just plain Southern hospitality.
coonass is actually derogitory name that people call cajuns,
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-07-2008, 01:18 AM
 
Location: Louisiana
36 posts, read 229,460 times
Reputation: 53
"Louisianaians" pronounced "Lu-zee-an-e-uns" for the most part for the person who could not get it to roll off the tounge.

I have been laughing reading this thread. You just gotta love folk from LA. From what I gather, Cajuns are more concentrated around the New Orleans area BUT, they are found up and down the coast of Louisiana. You are born a cajun and do not become one simply because of where you live. To them, anything below I-10 is considered "South Louisiana". My cajun friends call me "Yank" all the time because I live in North LA. If you meet a cajun, you will hear it in their voice. IMO, alot more of the cajun men seem to have more of a "higher" voice than other Louisianaian males. Also, I have met ALOT more true cajuns that were NOT offended by being called a "coonass" than were offended. But then again, cajuns are not easily offended and you would know it if you did offend one or would figure it out as you pick yourself up off the floor. I often wondered if the ones I met were offended by being called "coonass" and I ask them and they were not. I've always thought it was an "offensive term" myself. But, I am from Louisiana so, they may just be cutting me some slack. I would be on the safe side and not call them a "coonass" if you are not from Louisiana or a cajun. It's probably like how some black people call themselves the "N" word to theirselves but, find it offensive for others outside the race to use it.

That's just my 2 cents.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-11-2008, 10:20 PM
 
Location: Gulfport, MS
469 posts, read 2,634,129 times
Reputation: 543
Quote:
Originally Posted by hdwell View Post
My friend, there are certainly more ethnic groups in La than what you have listed here. I would never assume that anyone is a certain lineage just because of his/her last name. In this state are small communities of Hungarians Czechs Yugoslavs and larger Italian and Greek communities coupled with a healthy German population. We are all not either French or Scotch-Irish or African. Please, lets keep our story straight here. Thanks
Well, yeah! In every state you'll find small communities of various ethnicities. In Mississippi we have some old Lebanese families. But the Scots-Irish, African, French, Spanish, and some mixture of the above, make up the majority of residents. You don't have to go from A to Z listing each and every one.

As far as "Coonass" goes, it varies from person to person. Some Cajuns hate it, others tolerate it, some love it. I know Cajuns who will proudly say "I'm a coonass". I know a lot of non-Cajuns, including my family members, call them coonasses, and it's said in a friendly sort of joking way, not intended to be hurtful.

Last edited by Mississippienne; 02-11-2008 at 10:22 PM.. Reason: sp
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-26-2008, 09:52 PM
 
Location: USA
2,954 posts, read 7,299,826 times
Reputation: 2233
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mississippienne View Post
Well, yeah! In every state you'll find small communities of various ethnicities. In Mississippi we have some old Lebanese families. But the Scots-Irish, African, French, Spanish, and some mixture of the above, make up the majority of residents. You don't have to go from A to Z listing each and every one.

As far as "Coonass" goes, it varies from person to person. Some Cajuns hate it, others tolerate it, some love it. I know Cajuns who will proudly say "I'm a coonass". I know a lot of non-Cajuns, including my family members, call them coonasses, and it's said in a friendly sort of joking way, not intended to be hurtful.
Only trying to dispel the notion that Louisianians and fellow southerners are a bunch of inbred rednecks. Go ahead; brag I say. All the other states do why not us?
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-27-2008, 09:36 AM
 
3,590 posts, read 5,244,187 times
Reputation: 4776
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdmagana View Post
Since I am looking to move that way, Louisiana has been the topic of conversation at dinner the last few nights. An interesting question came up... What are you if you are from Louisiana?

For example, someone from California is a Californian, someone from New Mexico is a New Mexican, etc... What is the correct term for someone from Louisiana?

Louisianian? Louisian? Neither of those sounded right to me. My mom says say Cajun, but I thought Cajuns were their own group within Louisiana's population. Sorry if this seems like a really dumb question, but it has been on my mind for a couple of days.
I believe the correct answer is Louisianian or Louisiana native, because other groups besides the Cajuns reside there. Creoles are a definite term with a definitive meaning (I am one) are people of mixed lineage, essentially African, French, Native American and Spanish. There are also Creoles who reside in the Carribean region of the world. They are separate from the Louisiana Creole, though. Different food, language, culture and history. To learn more about Louisiana Creoles, there is a Creole Heritage Center on the Campus of Northwestern State University in Natchitoches.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-27-2008, 05:42 PM
 
Location: Baton Rouge
369 posts, read 1,561,460 times
Reputation: 207
Louisianian. I promise to take offense if you call me a coonass, and to a lesser extent, a cajun. I shouldn't take offense at being called a cajun but my grandmother always detested the word, preffering to classify herself as "French", and she taught us the same.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-28-2008, 08:33 AM
 
21 posts, read 109,273 times
Reputation: 22
I lived in Louisiana many years ago and my husband held a position with a radio station.
He, originally from the Midwest, was told to pronounce "Louisiana" as "Louisanna" as the state was named for King Louis and Queen Anna.

Thought this information might be helpful as you could pronounce what you would be called "Louisannan", runs off your tongue a little better.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-08-2008, 02:13 PM
 
1 posts, read 14,955 times
Reputation: 10
Default Cajun... who I be???

He everyone,

I was born and raised in Opelousas, Louisiana. I am 40 so I think that should qualify me ha ha. (I did live in Corpus Christi, Texas for about 7 years but moved back.... long story) I have always been known as Cajun and more or less in the center of Cajun Heartland) or also known as Acadiana. I have a very strong french and Indian heritage though I am so white I am transparent he he. My paternal grandfather was full Indian and my Grandmother was french. My maternal grandmother did not learn to speak English until she was 10 and was a Metrejean'. TOTALLY AND COMPLETELY CAJUN FRENCH, which is not the same dialect as Real French. My maternal grandfather passed away while mom was very young and my mother does not know much of his heritage. He was Wise from North Carolina is all I know.

Anyway, I want to warn any new comers from different climate states. As far south as I live, it is usually 80-90% humidity most of the year. I often gets around 103 degrees at the worst but factor in humidity and you will have a heat index at 110 degrees and you will easily sweat to death in a matter of minutes if not careful. If you ever wondered what hell feels like.... COME ON OVER . Oh yeah "Cajun Land" is still close enough to the coast line to get bumb-rushed by Hurricanes galore. Sometimes they are minor and fun.... sometimes they are not so fun. Just think I got hit by Hurr. Katrina ANNNNNDDD Hurricane Rita in 1 months time, ain't that grand? Had to saw a HUGE Oak tree to be able to get out of my darn door but at least we all came out healthy an uninjured..... but had to make home repairs twice. Oh did I mention that I also had to take in 5 (yeap I said 5 ) people for nearly 2 years (Hurricane Rita destroyed my husbands entire family's EVERYTHING so we took them in). So that makes NINE people in my home with 1 1/2 bath. I almost went insane and going to work everyday was a GODSEND HA HA HA...shhh don't tell them that though.

I know other states have there big weather issues as well so do not let that stop you from and join our crazy little cajun world. If you can tolerate alllll that and survive, we cajuns will love having you over. Lafayette is only 22 miles from Opelousas and a very very booming city of 100,000+, very diverse and still small enough to be friendly so if you are willing to drive in the Interstate (49) I think you will love it here.

[mod] edit [/mod]

Last edited by Sam I Am; 08-08-2008 at 05:59 PM.. Reason: no signature lines, no myspace links - put it in your profile
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-14-2008, 02:55 PM
 
450 posts, read 1,928,136 times
Reputation: 317
Thumbs up Ethnic diversity.

I have enjoyed reading all of these posts about the various ethnicities in Louisiana. I was first introduced to this complexity by reading the Nineteenth century author, George Washington Cable. He held to the idea that Creoles were people of either old French or Spanish descent.

He did touch on an area that made him very controversial at that time--the mixing of Creole and African blood. He was one of the first to recognize the large numbers of Quadroons and Octoroons that often passed for Creole in New Orleans society. A Quadroon is someone with 1/4 African descent and an Octoroon someone of 1/8th. These terms are rather dated in today's parlance--the term mulatto or High Yellow is also.

Cable thought these people of mixed white and black descent the most physically beautiful people. They formed the core of the "paid companion" business in Old Storeyville. A movie was made about that sometime ago--I think Leonardo DeCaprio was in it.

As to the Cajuns, the original term referred only to the French refugees from Acadia or Nova Scotia--but the definition has changed over the years. The "Redbones" are another story and equally as fascinating. I do not think there is another area in the world that has the ethinic diversity of Louisiana, with the exception of Hawaii and parts of the West Indies. Anyways, this is a fascinating thread.

After the slave revolt and subsequent independence of Haiti in the early
1800's--a huge influx of Creoles from that former French colony took refuge in New Orleans. That is the basis of the largest influx of the French population. Of course, some of these were of mixed French, Spanish, and even African descent. The Spanish came earlier, although the city passed between French and Spanish hands a number of times.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-15-2008, 05:26 AM
 
Location: Pineville, LA
10 posts, read 43,154 times
Reputation: 11
Okay, since hubby is a coonass, I had to get in on this.

Cajuns are not from New Orleans. They are usually Creoles. Cajuns are from Acadiana. This has to do with your family descent in that area, not just by living there.
I am from Central Louisiana, been here my whole life, and I am a redneck. Just southern.

I can say that while only some Cajuns will get upset if you call them coonasses, all of them hate being called creole. Creole is city, and Cajun is country. Hubby says that most creoles have some African American decent, with Cajuns don't. Cajuns are usually Caucasian.

That's just the simple truth of it, easiest way to tell the difference. Creoles are some of the most beautiful people you will ever see. I am considered a redneck by cajuns, though my mothers side of the family is all from cajun and indian descent. My fathers side is all mixed up though, and I look like the norweigan of his family (paternal gm is 100%), and was raised in Grant Parish, born in Shreveport, so I am only redneck.

Hubby on the other hand, his entire paternal side is full Cajun, and hailing from Erath, and you can trace it completely all the way back to Nova Scotia. His paternal grandparents speak English as a second language. His maternal side is a mix of Choctaw and Cajun, with his maternal grandmother being full blooded Choctaw.

He considers himself a proud coonass, as does the rest of his family, and though I would love to consider myself Cajun, that would be crazy to his family.. and I am not that silly. I do know that if you call his family creole, though, that's fighting words. They say all they got is food, second in line to theirs, and thats all. I have never met a Cajun that thought differently. I guess I'd feel the same if someone called me a yank... thats the opposite of what I am. lol. sorta like creole is opposite Cajun.

If you put me in a room with his family you can pick me out fast. They are all dark haired and darker skin, I am blond with white white skin. lol. He says his ancestors are rolling over in their graves, with my crazy foreign yankee blood.

And we just say Louisianian. Like "lew-ees-e-an-e-in". I just consider myself southern first, Louisianian second. That's the difference between me and a Cajun, though. Hubby considers himself Louisianian first, then southern.

Last edited by asimplegirl; 09-15-2008 at 06:06 AM..
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Settings
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2020 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Louisiana

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2021, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top