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Old 11-12-2007, 08:43 PM
Caa Caa started this thread
 
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I saw that there was a Latin Party over the weekend in New Orleans. How do people from New Orleans feel about the influx of Latins there? I live in Baton Rouge and frankly, I moved out of south Florida to get away from them! I still don't see a lot of them here, but I heard New Orleans is the next Miami!! True?
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Old 11-12-2007, 09:14 PM
 
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That would be interesting. It seems that the Hispanic population has gone up in Baton Rouge, too. I'm not in BR, but where I am I have many more Hispanic people around me than before Katrina, and I love it. Love hearing everyone speak Spanish, just wish I knew what they were saying half the time.
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Old 11-13-2007, 12:36 PM
 
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Default Not me

I get the feeling I dont always want to know what they are saying.
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Old 11-13-2007, 12:40 PM
 
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Default Needed

It is something necessary. The large influx has been laborers. People have come from all over to work. I would bet our welfare rolls are higher than ever but it is so darn difficult to find workers. Customer Services is tanking because companies are accepting warm bodies. Look at the number of companies bringing hispanics in legally from Mexico. So many things need to be fixed but how??
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Old 11-15-2007, 03:21 PM
Caa Caa started this thread
 
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Default Latin influx

I live in BR and the only influx of Hispnaics I have seen are always driving trucks or cars from either Florida or Texas which leads me to believe they are working in NO, but maybe not living in BR. I honestly have not seen too many here, but I came from South Florida where illegal immigrants have seriously taken over! I love BR and I have questionable attitudes towards Hispanics, but I guess we are kinda stuck huh?
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Old 11-15-2007, 03:42 PM
 
Location: Baton Rouge, LA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Caa View Post
I live in BR and the only influx of Hispnaics I have seen are always driving trucks or cars from either Florida or Texas which leads me to believe they are working in NO, but maybe not living in BR. I honestly have not seen too many here, but I came from South Florida where illegal immigrants have seriously taken over! I love BR and I have questionable attitudes towards Hispanics, but I guess we are kinda stuck huh?
I've noticed the Hispanic population in town is pretty concentrated. As in, in the Siegen/St George/Southpark Dr areas of town. And if you go to Wal Mart on Siegen, you see some Hispanics.
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Old 11-16-2007, 09:29 PM
 
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I have nothing against Hispanics whatsoever. I don't advocate illegal immigration, but people are people. There are certainly many good Latin folks. And we should not forget that a Spanish flag once flew over Louisiana. In fact I grew up near Zwolle, Louisiana, home of the Zwolle Tamale Festival, and also home of one of the oldest Hispanic populations in North America.

See description below....Hispanics are nothing new in Louisiana!

"Los Adaesaños

In 1719, Franciscan missionaries came from Mexico and Texas to attempt conversion of Native Americans. As the French moved towards Texas, Spanish missions were established to encourage trade between the tribes, the Spaniards, and the French. Fearful of French expansionism, Spanish authorities established a full garrison, a royal presidio, Nuestra Señora del Pilar de los Adaes, to guard the Louisiana Texas frontier (1721 – 1773). Closed after Louisiana became a Spanish territory, Adaesaño families were ordered back to Texas. Gradually they managed to return to their patria chica in northwestern Louisiana. Centered today in east Texas (Nacogdoches, Chireno, Moral) and in Sabine and Natchitoches Parish, Louisiana (Zwolle, Ebarb, and Spanish Lake) communities, their descendents represent one of the oldest Hispanic or Indo-Hispanic populations in North America."

Last edited by etland; 11-16-2007 at 10:48 PM.. Reason: typo
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Old 11-16-2007, 10:15 PM
 
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I don't care if they're Hispanic, German, Italian, or whatever ... but if they're going to live and work here they need to speak the English language.
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Old 11-16-2007, 10:42 PM
Caa Caa started this thread
 
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Originally Posted by CindyM View Post
I don't care if they're Hispanic, German, Italian, or whatever ... but if they're going to live and work here they need to speak the English language.
I agree with Cindym. People need to conform! I also am aware of the Hispanic control over Louisiana, but that has absolutely nothing to do with what is going on today!!! History is just that-history.
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Old 11-16-2007, 11:01 PM
 
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Originally Posted by CindyM View Post
I don't care if they're Hispanic, German, Italian, or whatever ... but if they're going to live and work here they need to speak the English language.
I disagree. One of the things I dislike about this country (and I am a part of it, however involuntarily) is the fact that we don't really teach our young ones different languages. I have always heard that many European countries do this. I think we have only ourselves to blame for our ethnocentric nature. Also, English has not yet been declared as the national language. I saw a map somewhere of the Spanish-speaking populations in the United States, and I was amazed at what large percentage we have of people who speak primarily Spanish. Maybe we should lose this attitude that the United States is all about speaking English, since so many people living here don't speak it as their first language.

Especially in the cases of people from Latin American countries, I have read enough depressing history to see how our government has impacted their economies (and conditions in their countries in general) in such a negative way. I think they're more than entitled to take advantages of opportunities in the U.S.
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