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Old 03-09-2015, 01:49 PM
 
352 posts, read 295,507 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by waymire01 View Post
Looking to move out of Lake Charles...
The real estate agent says it's not any more of an issue there than anywhere else in LA.. but I was hoping to get some feedback from people familiar with the area...
Thanks in advance.
Your question is difficult for many who live in the area to answer because flooding only has to occur for a few minutes to damage a home and slips away leaving little trace to the untrained eye.

I have been on a similar search but with the opposite intention in Calcasieu Parish, conservation and restoration before the land rush begins. My three year adventure has highlighted the delta areas along the Sabine, Calcasieu and Houston river to be the most flood prone with almost all of Ham Reid road and South being a flood risk too (after Hurricane Rita).

Observations:
* Damaging local flooding occurs when the neighborhood throws trash into and does not maintain their ditches.

* Areas as far as 1/2 mile away from a bayou, "Choupique" comes to mind, can flood homes if the residents have not built small earthen levees in their front yard. Carlyss residents have done this with exceptional results.

* Check the internet for the flood zone maps of the area.

* Areas bounded by Dequincy to the North, Hwy 27 to the east and Houston river to the South are part of a massive delta called Persimmon Gully, and must be respected for their tendency to flood during the spring rain season in SWLA. Dequincy actually drains into Buxton Creek that runs right through this area.

My Opinion/Conclusion:
If you are really a concerned buyer then get in your vehicle and drive to areas you want to buy while it is raining outside. I do all this all the time. Check for any ditch maintenance issues before considering a neighborhood a flood zone. In my neighborhood, we all band together and clear out our ditches frequently in the rain. The activity ensures our homes are safe and keeps the Parish officials from tearing up your yard with tractor equipment.
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Old 03-09-2015, 03:16 PM
 
48 posts, read 89,685 times
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Thank you so much for actually addressing my question.
I agree that the hardest part about flooding is that it can happen very quickly, do a lot of damage, and disappear just as fast. Many years ago I had purchased property outside of Breaux Bridge in a new development, we were the first house built. We did not have regulations nearly as strict as in this area regarding construction.. our home was not required to be very high.. flood zone/danger was never mentioned to us during the entire process of buying the land and building the home. During the two years we lived there we never had a single issue with flooding. We had to move out of the area due to my husband being transferred unexpectedly and leased the property.. the very next year it flooded so severely that the tenants were essentially stranded in their home for almost a week. Both their vehicles were totaled. The house was just inches above the water level. Only then did we start hearing from others in the area about the history of flooding there.. every few years something like that would happen. The "old timers" new better than to build there. Similarly when we lived in Oklahoma it was well known that Moore is naturally situated at ground zero for a major tornado when conditions are right.. yet every time it happens developers rebuild homes in the area. We had family who had lived in the area for years that warned us away.. but without that resource people are sitting ducks and the developers and realtors are certainly not stepping forward to tell the truth.
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Old 03-10-2015, 06:28 AM
 
352 posts, read 295,507 times
Reputation: 562
Quote:
Originally Posted by waymire01 View Post
... Similarly when we lived in Oklahoma it was well known that Moore is naturally situated at ground zero for a major tornado when conditions are right.. yet every time it happens developers rebuild homes in the area. We had family who had lived in the area for years that warned us away.. but without that resource people are sitting ducks and the developers and realtors are certainly not stepping forward to tell the truth.
As a native Okie, I must say that the whole state from Ponca City and South is a threat for tornado damage. We all just accept it as a way of life and know where the nearest storm cellar is right?

The interesting aspect is that you are living in Hurricane alley now which in many respects is more dangerous to property due to the size of these storms. We can't hide in a cellar from a hurricane due to flooding concerns either! Yet, a well built home and the right preparation can survive a category 3 hurricane with only minor roofing shingle damage.

Finally, don't be tempted to pay $10,000 an acre for land outside city limits. The land market in this region of Louisiana is mostly dormant due to low property taxes. Try contacting land owners in areas that you like and make an offer. Many people own land that was handed down 2 and 4 generations that they have never actually seen.
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