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Old 08-02-2015, 06:33 PM
 
Location: Energy Corridor-ish
216 posts, read 222,557 times
Reputation: 160

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I grew up in LA, but have been in the Houston area most of my adult life. I never noticed while I was in the state, but now that I'm not, I realize that the national "production builders" i.e. Ryland, Darling, Perry, etc. don't have a presence in Louisiana. I'm curious as to why that is. Does anyone have any insight? Thanks.
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Old 08-03-2015, 07:28 PM
 
Location: Lake Charles, Louisiana
182 posts, read 442,995 times
Reputation: 50
Interesting question. I had to google "Production Builders" to see what you were asking. I think since Lake Charles is now growing (booming really) somebody ought to take advantage of this there. Interestingly, in Lake Charles, until a few years ago there were very few if any condominiums. But maybe it's because Louisiana just hasn't been growing in population like the rest of the country. We've lost a couple of representative seats the last few decades if that tells you anything. If there's no one to live in production homes then why build them?
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Old 08-04-2015, 08:06 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
11,723 posts, read 10,429,963 times
Reputation: 6910
Louisiana has had a fairly stable population over the years and the last boom time was the 60's and 70's so many houses are circa that era. New Orleans is currently booming but there are still like 10,000 structures that could be purchased and renovated. You have to remember that New Orleans at one time had 600,000 people and now it has like 400,000. So, there are lots of abandoned homes that can be bought cheaply and then repaired.

Monroe is booming with CTL but then again it had declined so many years there is an abundant housing stock. Shreveport is somewhat stagnant right now.

Baton Rouge is growing and you'll see some modern houses there, but most of the new homes have been in the Lafayette area. But the scale is nothing like in Texas.

Lake Charles has held the same population-wise since 1975. So, the existing housing stock has sufficed since then. They build some new homes, but there are many old ones ready for move-in.

Now Lake Charles is having a boom but it looks like hotels, man camps, and absorption of existing stock is what is going to house those new people.
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Old 08-09-2015, 11:04 AM
 
5,237 posts, read 2,525,379 times
Reputation: 3695


What do we have of industry to attract "Large Scale Production Builders"

When there is high% population changes, then it becomes feasible for Production Builders to come in.

Shreveport for Instance:
We might be able to utilize the Production Builders, IF we could "DESIGNATED AREAS FOR MASSIVE REBUILDING". Not that we don't have massive volumes of vacant land, the city needs "massive rebuilding in various areas'. It would take a campaign similar to how the State uses when they want to acquire massive land for new infrastructure. If we could use that principle in the worn out dilapidated areas to mass acquire the property for rebuilding, then we'd have something to market to the community of Production Builders.
Now, they function only in areas where there is a big demographic shift to some of the outer areas, but they are not the massive builders like you'd see in California, when it connected Orange Country to the Outer lying areas which transformed the dry lake bed into new and massive communities.
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Old 08-10-2015, 06:39 AM
 
352 posts, read 295,811 times
Reputation: 562
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chance and Change View Post

What do we have of industry to attract "Large Scale Production Builders"

When there is high% population changes, then it becomes feasible for Production Builders to come in.

Shreveport for Instance:
We might be able to utilize the Production Builders, IF we could "DESIGNATED AREAS FOR MASSIVE REBUILDING". Not that we don't have massive volumes of vacant land, the city needs "massive rebuilding in various areas'. It would take a campaign similar to how the State uses when they want to acquire massive land for new infrastructure. If we could use that principle in the worn out dilapidated areas to mass acquire the property for rebuilding, then we'd have something to market to the community of Production Builders.
Now, they function only in areas where there is a big demographic shift to some of the outer areas, but they are not the massive builders like you'd see in California, when it connected Orange Country to the Outer lying areas which transformed the dry lake bed into new and massive communities.
The problem with Shreveport land is that the property owners have left and not paid their back due taxes. As a result, they cannot sell and no one will buy the land from them directly because the buyers would have to pay thousands in fees.

If someone wanted to revitalize Shreveport then they would need to buy the land as adjudicated property. Adjudicated property involves a public auction and public notification process to the former owners asking them to pay the back taxes or lose their property. In the end, land can be purchased for about 15% of its value and it will bring these properties back into commerce. I use the same legal procedures to revitalize abandoned oil fields in Louisiana as Longleaf pine forests for conservation efforts and to fight global warming.

In summary: The land is available and I disapprove of anyone advocating more development of Louisiana rural areas like old lake beds, forests or marshes when basic legal paperwork is an option already on the table. Fighting this type of urban development sprawl is one of my key environmental initiatives!
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