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Old 11-09-2018, 10:47 AM
 
8,316 posts, read 4,676,442 times
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Originally Posted by victimofGM View Post
You’re ignorant. Hospitals cannot turn away patients to the ER if they can’t afford to pay or if they don’t have insurance.
Yes, they can. What hospitals can't turn away are life-threatening conditions in ER. They must treat and stabilize, to the point that they can be transferred to a charity hospital, if they don't have insurance or qualify for Medicaid, if that hospital doesn't take Medicaid. They do not have to treat people who show up with non-serious injuries or illnesses, like sinusitis or broken finger.

La. has expanded Medicaid, so it covers a lot of people. The predicament for many, though, like other states, is the working class...their employers don't provide insurance, and they don't have income left after expenses, to buy insurance (even with the ACA subsidy). And if you can get ACA insurance, it most likely has a very high deductible ($6,000 is not uncommon), which you have to pay out of pocket. It's a problem.
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Old 11-09-2018, 11:21 AM
 
360 posts, read 301,566 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bpollen View Post
...
La. has expanded Medicaid, so it covers a lot of people. The predicament for many, though, like other states, is the working class...their employers don't provide insurance, and they don't have income left after expenses, to buy insurance (even with the ACA subsidy). And if you can get ACA insurance, it most likely has a very high deductible ($6,000 is not uncommon), which you have to pay out of pocket. It's a problem.

I would like to point out that those employers who do provide free health insurance for the employee (not including other dependents) are often told by potential new employees that they should pay more than the other company down the road. We don't pay more than the other company down the road because we offer health insurance.


OMG! I AM A TERRIBLE PERSON BECAUSE I POINT THE FINGER OF BLAME AT THE PERSON WHO TOOK THE JOB WITH NO HEALTHINSURANCE!


Is there a penalty or government tax I should pay for typing this terrible statement?
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Old 11-23-2018, 07:33 PM
 
8,316 posts, read 4,676,442 times
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Originally Posted by rgathrights View Post
I would like to point out that those employers who do provide free health insurance for the employee (not including other dependents) are often told by potential new employees that they should pay more than the other company down the road. We don't pay more than the other company down the road because we offer health insurance.


OMG! I AM A TERRIBLE PERSON BECAUSE I POINT THE FINGER OF BLAME AT THE PERSON WHO TOOK THE JOB WITH NO HEALTHINSURANCE!


Is there a penalty or government tax I should pay for typing this terrible statement?
Some fields of work do not provide free healthcare. It doesn't matter where you apply. None of them provide health insurance, or at the least, few do. Auto Mechanic is one example, except maybe at a big dealership. Most low pay jobs have employers who do not pay for health insurance. WalMart used to offer it, but the employees were required to pay for it. But the employees were paid so little that many couldn't afford to pay for it. I don't know what it's like at WalMart now, though, since WMT has made improvements to that, as well as improved pay. There was a time when the govt was paying for WMT employees' healthcare (if they qualified for Medicaid) and food supplements.

In all First World countries, there are a variety of jobs that are filled, from those requiring a lot of education, to those requiring minimal skills. All honest jobs are honorable. All jobs perform a necessary function in society and should not be scoffed at because they are not at the top. Remember - no matter how close to the top you are, there is always someone above your level. And no matter your level, all deserve at least a basic level of healthcare. A person can't have life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness without it. As other First World countries have realized, a healthy public is good for the country. Healthy children grow up to be healthier, more productive, and more highly paid adults.
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Old 11-26-2018, 06:45 AM
 
1,706 posts, read 818,657 times
Reputation: 1614
Idk how to better phrase my question. How do the quality of medicine stack up against other states? Not insurance (as I’m sure that’s a national issue). Doctors in LA vs doctors on the east coast? You could say a doctor is a doctor but the same could be said about schools/education. And we all know that’s not true.
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Old 11-26-2018, 12:52 PM
 
8,316 posts, read 4,676,442 times
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Originally Posted by Va83 View Post
Idk how to better phrase my question. How do the quality of medicine stack up against other states? Not insurance (as I’m sure that’s a national issue). Doctors in LA vs doctors on the east coast? You could say a doctor is a doctor but the same could be said about schools/education. And we all know that’s not true.
That may be more a case of big city/big hospitals vs. small cities/hospitals. The big cities & big hospitals attract the cream of the crop because they can pay more and because there is more competition among doctors to work at prestigious hospitals and medical affiliates.

It's not the state lines that matter so much as living in proximity to a big city, since it is likely to have big hospitals. That big city may or may not be in your state. I don't think the state matters much, except to the extent that your state has some really big cities.

La. has few big cities, compared to some other states. Baton Rouge, New Orleans. I wouldn't include Shreveport. Whereas Texas has Dallas, Houston, and Austin. Texas has some of the best doctors in the nation, IMO, in Dallas and Houston.

Even if your state has great hospitals & providers, it is possible that a big city out of state might be closer to you. Here in SW La, Houston is closer than Baton Rouge or New Orleans.

If you couldn't go outside of SW La (because of the distance or your insurance or whatever), I would say that the quality of care would be probably just adequate. Not bad, but not like a big city could offer. I think that would be the case in any state where you live in a mid-sized city and can't travel outside of it for medical care.

Last edited by bpollen; 11-26-2018 at 01:02 PM..
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Old 01-17-2019, 12:31 AM
 
8,316 posts, read 4,676,442 times
Reputation: 17444
Quote:
Originally Posted by victimofGM View Post
You’re ignorant. Hospitals cannot turn away patients to the ER if they can’t afford to pay or if they don’t have insurance.
Yes, they can. I see this statement by posters occasionally and don't know why people think that.

Hospitals only have to take people in ER if they are in a life threatening situation. They have to treat them to the point that they are out of danger and can be transferred elsewhere or released. They do not have to treat people who can't pay, if their lives are not in danger.

If somene shows up with a broken arm or bad sinusitis, the ER can turn them away if they can't pay/don't have insurance. ERs frequently will ask for a monetary deposit, if there isn't insurance.

If it were the case that ERs have to treat people, some people would quit buying insurance and use ER regularly for everything.
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Old 01-17-2019, 12:36 AM
 
8,316 posts, read 4,676,442 times
Reputation: 17444
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Originally Posted by Va83 View Post
I would love to know more about the state of your healthcare system. From insurance to hospitals to care options. I’d like an opinion on it all.
It would be helpful for you to identify what you want to know. Otherwise, it would take a super long post and some time to write a thesis on all aspects of the healthcare system in any state. There is employer insurance, individual insurance, the ACA, Medicaid, Medicare, doctors, hospitals, charity hospitals, clinics, urgent care places, nursing assistants that can substitute for drs for some things, specialists, general practitioners, cancer treatments, cosmetic surgery, cost for each of those, age-related cost, the general health of residents of the state, the satisfaction that people in the state have w/their healthcare and healthcare options, etc.

These things may vary by city or parish.

If you want an entire rundown of the hc system in every parish in the state, you probably need to do online research, since that would be a lot of information.
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