U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Louisiana
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 02-05-2019, 02:19 PM
 
Location: The Heart of Dixie
8,877 posts, read 13,270,794 times
Reputation: 5733

Advertisements

I'm originally from the New Orleans area and now live closer to Baton Rouge and have been all over South Louisiana, though the most far north I've been in the state is Pineville.

There are some people that claim certain areas in South Louisiana are culturally more like North Louisiana than South. I've heard this the most about St. Francisville, some of the Florida Parishes and portions of the Northshore (especially Tangipahoa Parish). Some people even say that about Livingston where I currently live. So how true is this? I think the Cajun influence is still very evident in Livingston Parish especially around Port Vincent and Denham Springs especially in terms of the food culture.

I also do feel there is a heavy New Orleans Creole influence in Ponchatoula and Hammond which have lots of New Orleans transplants and is officially part of the New Orleans metro.

So is it actually true that there are places in South Louisiana more like North Louisiana? What about the other way around?

And yes I've heard the "everything north of I-10 is Yankees" thing but isn't that just really about the extension of Cajun/Creole culture? I mean most of Gonzales and Prairieville is north of I-10.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-05-2019, 03:31 PM
 
287 posts, read 438,352 times
Reputation: 278
I think you pretty much hit the nail on the head. Florida Parishes, Livingston, and maybe some areas of the river parishes to a lesser extent feel more like typical southern areas and have less Cajun/Creole influence.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-05-2019, 06:24 PM
 
3,706 posts, read 1,278,734 times
Reputation: 2510
St. Tammany Parish felt very typical Deep Southern to me, not too much Cajun or Creole. Slidell or Mandeville could probably stand in for coastal Georgia or South Carolina in a movie.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-05-2019, 09:29 PM
 
Location: Denver
14,593 posts, read 21,180,385 times
Reputation: 9573
I'd agree that areas like northern Livingston parish and other areas don't have much cajun or creole culture but it's still not north Louisiana.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-12-2019, 03:53 PM
 
Location: The Heart of Dixie
8,877 posts, read 13,270,794 times
Reputation: 5733
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrJester View Post
St. Tammany Parish felt very typical Deep Southern to me, not too much Cajun or Creole. Slidell or Mandeville could probably stand in for coastal Georgia or South Carolina in a movie.
I feel the New Orleans influence is pretty deep in St. Tammany Parish, especially Covington and Mandeville. A lot of people who live in St. Tammany are transplants from New Orleans or the inner suburbs like Metairie. I'd say if you go to a local restaurant in Covington, Mandeville, or even Hammond the media would be more similar to a New Orleans restaurant than a South Carolina restaurant. I think if you go to a local restaurant in Baton Rouge or even St. Francisville the menu would be more similar to a Lafayette restaurant than a Georgia or Tennessee restaurant. I'm not sure what it would be like in Shreveport or Monroe, if you even have etoufee or gumbo or jambalaya on the menu at all.

I think Livingston Parish has a definite Cajun element especially toward Maurepas and French Settlement but its not as strong as Ascension Parish.

I'd say the Northshore has a New Orleans Creole influence but not so much of a Cajun one. Same with southern Mississippi actually.

I've never figured out whether Lake Charles is Cajun country or not. It IS the only place where I've heard Cajun French spoken by locals which is cool.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-14-2019, 05:29 PM
 
Location: Denver
14,593 posts, read 21,180,385 times
Reputation: 9573
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Lennox 70 View Post
I feel the New Orleans influence is pretty deep in St. Tammany Parish, especially Covington and Mandeville. A lot of people who live in St. Tammany are transplants from New Orleans or the inner suburbs like Metairie. I'd say if you go to a local restaurant in Covington, Mandeville, or even Hammond the media would be more similar to a New Orleans restaurant than a South Carolina restaurant. I think if you go to a local restaurant in Baton Rouge or even St. Francisville the menu would be more similar to a Lafayette restaurant than a Georgia or Tennessee restaurant. I'm not sure what it would be like in Shreveport or Monroe, if you even have etoufee or gumbo or jambalaya on the menu at all.

I think Livingston Parish has a definite Cajun element especially toward Maurepas and French Settlement but its not as strong as Ascension Parish.

I'd say the Northshore has a New Orleans Creole influence but not so much of a Cajun one. Same with southern Mississippi actually.

I've never figured out whether Lake Charles is Cajun country or not. It IS the only place where I've heard Cajun French spoken by locals which is cool.
New Orleans media is on on the northshore because it's in New Orleans' media market.
Lake Charles is in cajun country. I'd argue Orange county, Texas is too.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-15-2019, 06:54 PM
 
Location: The Heart of Dixie
8,877 posts, read 13,270,794 times
Reputation: 5733
Quote:
Originally Posted by annie_himself View Post
New Orleans media is on on the northshore because it's in New Orleans' media market.
Lake Charles is in cajun country. I'd argue Orange county, Texas is too.
That was a typo, I mean the menus in a local restaurant in Hammond would be more similar to New Orleans than Atlanta.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-15-2019, 11:09 PM
 
3,706 posts, read 1,278,734 times
Reputation: 2510
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Lennox 70 View Post
I feel the New Orleans influence is pretty deep in St. Tammany Parish, especially Covington and Mandeville. A lot of people who live in St. Tammany are transplants from New Orleans or the inner suburbs like Metairie. I'd say if you go to a local restaurant in Covington, Mandeville, or even Hammond the media would be more similar to a New Orleans restaurant than a South Carolina restaurant. I think if you go to a local restaurant in Baton Rouge or even St. Francisville the menu would be more similar to a Lafayette restaurant than a Georgia or Tennessee restaurant. I'm not sure what it would be like in Shreveport or Monroe, if you even have etoufee or gumbo or jambalaya on the menu at all.
I think you might be right when it comes to food, but I like to play devil's advocate and say that St. Tammany might actually have more in common with Southern Georgia or South Carolina than with New Orleans:

1. Coastal Georgia and South Carolina have a cuisine similar to creole cuisine.
2. There are really no pine forests on the Southshore. Whereas both St. Tammany and Coastal Georgia/South Carolina are filled with pine forests.
3. St. Tammany Parish is mostly white and Republican and therefore has more in common with coastal Georgia/South Carolina, politically, than NOLA.
4. St. Tammany is really your classic Deep South suburban town indistinguishable from rural Southern Georgia or South Carolina, whereas NOLA is a colonial-era, historic tourist magnet.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-16-2019, 09:36 AM
 
Location: USA
2,861 posts, read 7,027,384 times
Reputation: 2035
Tom,
Shreveport and Monroe do have étouffée, Jambalaya, and gumbo in many of their restaurants. It depends on the restaurant's specialty. Lots of BBQ up here, and seafood and fish. Not as much old style southern cooking as you would expect, but people do like that.

Mexican just about trumps everything else. Many Asian restaurants especially Sushi. If you go to the boats you won't get a great deal of local flavor. But I think most all the restaurants in SBC are pretty good.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-16-2019, 02:01 PM
 
3,328 posts, read 1,477,490 times
Reputation: 2989
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrJester View Post
I think you might be right when it comes to food, but I like to play devil's advocate and say that St. Tammany might actually have more in common with Southern Georgia or South Carolina than with New Orleans:

1. Coastal Georgia and South Carolina have a cuisine similar to creole cuisine.
2. There are really no pine forests on the Southshore. Whereas both St. Tammany and Coastal Georgia/South Carolina are filled with pine forests.
3. St. Tammany Parish is mostly white and Republican and therefore has more in common with coastal Georgia/South Carolina, politically, than NOLA.
4. St. Tammany is really your classic Deep South suburban town indistinguishable from rural Southern Georgia or South Carolina, whereas NOLA is a colonial-era, historic tourist magnet.
Have lived on the Northshore for almost 30 years. Disagree completely that St. Tammany is like southern Georgia and SC. No way. It is very similar to Metarie in almost every way, politics, food, etc... Can't stand the food in coastal SC. - too bland and not a fan of shrimp and grits. Northern Livingston Parish and northeastern Tangipahoa Parish are kind of similar to north LA.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Settings
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2020 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Louisiana
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:36 PM.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top