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Old 02-28-2019, 12:00 PM
 
Location: Lafayette, LA
3 posts, read 3,268 times
Reputation: 15

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https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0121071306.htm

https://www.theguardian.com/cities/2...odern-atlantis

I was curious on other residents thoughts on this? I personally believe the city is sinking hence the major potholes forming in the streets over the last couple of years. Moreso, does this scare or worry any of you Nola residents?
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Old 02-28-2019, 04:45 PM
 
4,251 posts, read 2,151,265 times
Reputation: 1572
Just reposting your links so clickable...you’ll need a few more post before yours will work (to prevent spam).

https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0121071306.htm

https://www.theguardian.com/cities/2...odern-atlantis
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Old 02-28-2019, 07:40 PM
 
Location: Lafayette, La
2,049 posts, read 4,722,408 times
Reputation: 1447
there are a lot of cities in danger of sinking, like Mexico City, Venice, and even Bangkok. NOLA wont be the first or the last great city to fall
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Old 02-28-2019, 09:21 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
11,747 posts, read 10,500,344 times
Reputation: 6931
With the new levee protection system finished, New Orleans is safer than any other coastal city in the US. Houston is far more at risk, virtually no protection there (Hurricane Harvey proved that).
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Old 03-01-2019, 05:25 PM
 
1,070 posts, read 361,308 times
Reputation: 849
Quote:
Originally Posted by cBach View Post
With the new levee protection system finished, New Orleans is safer than any other coastal city in the US. Houston is far more at risk, virtually no protection there (Hurricane Harvey proved that).
What you're forgetting is that the floods in Houston don't come from storm surge like NOLA had with Katrina, they comes from biblical heavy rains falling all over land that has no effective large-scale drainage. There is no megastructure that can protect against that type of flooding, all that can be done is impart stricter regulations on development: build more reservoirs, reverse the sprawl in favor of high density and urban growth boundaries, and focus any water-side developments farther east along the bayous (where they are wide enough to handle flood waters without overflowing their banks).
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Old 03-13-2019, 01:06 PM
 
Location: The Woodlands
268 posts, read 422,629 times
Reputation: 256
Quote:
Originally Posted by cBach View Post
With the new levee protection system finished, New Orleans is safer than any other coastal city in the US. Houston is far more at risk, virtually no protection there (Hurricane Harvey proved that).
As a Houston resident, that Water from Harvey was drained out in most places naturally within days.

Lots of run of gradually downhill to the Gulf. Plenty of bayous around here too.

I'll take my chances here....
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Old 03-14-2019, 02:10 PM
 
Location: Jack-town, Sip by way of TN, AL and FL
1,279 posts, read 864,136 times
Reputation: 1904
Quote:
Originally Posted by cBach View Post
With the new levee protection system finished, New Orleans is safer than any other coastal city in the US. Houston is far more at risk, virtually no protection there (Hurricane Harvey proved that).
Yep, a 500 year storm. How many hurricanes hit NOLA within a 500 year period?

I'd take my chances in Houston (you know, the city that grew because Galveston was demolished by hurricane).
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Old 03-17-2019, 08:51 AM
 
1,373 posts, read 2,449,968 times
Reputation: 1043
New Orleans and SE Louisiana is one perfect storm away from being completely wiped out. If Katrina would have hit 60 miles west and stayed at the same intensity it was at a day earlier, New Orleans for all practical purposes would be no more, end of story.
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Old 03-21-2019, 08:03 PM
 
Location: Denver
14,411 posts, read 20,885,336 times
Reputation: 9319
It's only that way from its building the levees, otherwise there would be much more natural protection.
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Old 03-22-2019, 03:33 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
11,747 posts, read 10,500,344 times
Reputation: 6931
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mississippi Alabama Line View Post
Yep, a 500 year storm. How many hurricanes hit NOLA within a 500 year period?

I'd take my chances in Houston (you know, the city that grew because Galveston was demolished by hurricane).
Houston has more risk as was shown by Harvey. At least there are levees in New Orleans. You'll see.
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