U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Louisiana
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-03-2019, 02:35 AM
 
102 posts, read 49,450 times
Reputation: 101

Advertisements

I wanted to know why Northern Louisiana isn't as French as Southern Louisiana which is also known as Acadiana or Cajun country.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-03-2019, 10:54 AM
 
Location: annandale, va & slidell, la
9,266 posts, read 4,261,903 times
Reputation: 8451
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dylanperr View Post
I wanted to know why Northern Louisiana isn't as French as Southern Louisiana which is also known as Acadiana or Cajun country.
The exiled Acadiennes arrived by boat. Their life is on the water. A few have been spotted as far north as Carencro!
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-03-2019, 02:42 PM
 
128 posts, read 91,168 times
Reputation: 171
The French initially went up the Mississippi River to enter Louisiana and established New Orleans. New Orleans linked the Louisiana Colony with Saint-Domingue (now Haiti). The French did try to establish a settlement in Fort Rosalie (present-day Natchez, Mississippi), which is up quite a bit from the Gulf of Mexico. It thrived for a while, but the Europeans were later annihilated by American Indians living there. After this, the French stuck primarily to the lower part of the state for purpose of permanent European settlement, although there were several French posts up the Mississippi River, including Sainte-Geneviève (the precursor to St. Louis, Missouri)--founded by Canadians working for the French in the 1730s.

After Napoleon sold Louisiana to the USA, Anglo-Protestant settlers from the East, many of them Scotch-Irish, filled in the northern part of the state.

Voilà ein 'tit brin d'histoire louisianaise ("A bit of Louisiana history.").
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-19-2019, 01:58 PM
 
Location: The Colony
40 posts, read 17,833 times
Reputation: 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by Schwartzmann View Post
The French initially went up the Mississippi River to enter Louisiana and established New Orleans. New Orleans linked the Louisiana Colony with Saint-Domingue (now Haiti). The French did try to establish a settlement in Fort Rosalie (present-day Natchez, Mississippi), which is up quite a bit from the Gulf of Mexico. It thrived for a while, but the Europeans were later annihilated by American Indians living there. After this, the French stuck primarily to the lower part of the state for purpose of permanent European settlement, although there were several French posts up the Mississippi River, including Sainte-Geneviève (the precursor to St. Louis, Missouri)--founded by Canadians working for the French in the 1730s.

After Napoleon sold Louisiana to the USA, Anglo-Protestant settlers from the East, many of them Scotch-Irish, filled in the northern part of the state.

Voilà ein 'tit brin d'histoire louisianaise ("A bit of Louisiana history.").
This is so neat to hear. I don't think I've ever heard the part about the Scotch-Irish before, but my grandfathers surname was Westmoreland and his family came from the Many area with a strong presence in Shreveport.

My grandmother, or so the story goes, surname was Andrews and they were from the Alexandria area. However, I've been told Andrews was derived from Andrus from a bit further south.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-21-2019, 11:42 AM
 
Location: New Orleans
1,477 posts, read 2,498,715 times
Reputation: 1833
Quote:
Originally Posted by finalmove View Post
The exiled Acadiennes arrived by boat. Their life is on the water. A few have been spotted as far north as Carencro!
Don't forget their pockets in Avoyelles Parish
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-02-2020, 05:40 AM
 
844 posts, read 387,731 times
Reputation: 624
You can get Cajun culture and cuisine as far north as Alexandria. Anywhere north is pretty much north Louisiana.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-03-2020, 08:30 AM
 
Location: Austin, TX
12,064 posts, read 11,486,352 times
Reputation: 7184
The French did settle Northern Louisiana. Natchitoches is the oldest settlement in the Louisiana territory.

The thing is, transport was difficult in that area (N. LA) because there were logjams on the rivers. Henry Shreve cleared the logjam on the Red River and Shreveport was founded but that was much later.

Because of the logjams, the only areas that could be settled and accessed via pirogue/small boats were in the swamps in Southern Louisiana (they are marshes so no logjams) or along the Mississippi River which was wide enough to no have logjams.

Thus the settlements tended to be in Southern Louisiana and along the MS River. There was no reason to be further north than Baton Rouge as ocean going vessels cannot navigate past the rapids north of Baton Rouge.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-03-2020, 11:18 AM
 
6,751 posts, read 8,172,737 times
Reputation: 4074
Does this also explain why southern Louisiana is predominantly Catholic and northern Louisiana is mainly Baptist?
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-03-2020, 11:37 AM
 
Location: Austin, TX
12,064 posts, read 11,486,352 times
Reputation: 7184
Quote:
Originally Posted by ram2 View Post
Does this also explain why southern Louisiana is predominantly Catholic and northern Louisiana is mainly Baptist?
Pretty much.

The original French settlers settled around New Orleans, Baton Rouge, and Avoyelles Parish up to Natchitoches.

The Cajun (former Acadian) settlers settled to the southwest near Houma, along Bayou Lafourche, and west into Lafayette and Lake Charles.

Once Louisiana became a state, Americans populated northern Louisiana from eastern states. They also did that in southern Louisiana but it was starting from a much larger base population. For instance in 1840 New Orleans was the 3rd largest city in the US whereas there were no towns of more than a 1,000 up in Northern Louisiana.

American settlers to New Orleans settled in the Garden District and Uptown while the French settled the French Quarter and the Marigy. There were actually two municipal governments for a period of time.

The French, however, had political control so rich American families usually had their daughter married into a proper French Creole name to get the influence and political power. The Creoles married into the American families to get the wealth. In order to succeed in New Orleans you had to have Creole blood and be Catholic, so many Americans converted.

In northern Louisiana it was rural and mostly Baptists. Towns and cities formed later. The existing towns like Natchitoches were primarily French and Catholic but soon the newer towns like Shreveport, Alexandria, and Monroe overtook Natchitoches in population.

In southern Louisiana the population centers were always French (Baton Rouge, New Orleans, Lafayette, Lake Charles, Houma) and no new center overtook them. They were always dominant.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-15-2020, 01:11 AM
 
8,790 posts, read 5,472,922 times
Reputation: 19036
Just to add, the French were primarily hunters, tradesmen, and fishermen. So the southern part of the area would have been more profitable for them. The French also tended not to migrate much, once they settled.

As for Catholicism, both the French and the Spanish were Catholics. France gave Louisiana to the Spanish centuries ago, so the state was also heavily settled & developed by the Spaniards. By then, the main living areas were in the south & middle La., so I guess the Spaniards stayed around the areas where others already lived.

I didn't know N La was settled by the Scot Irish & was heavily Baptist. I wonder if it's because N La is in that horizontal section of the southern part of the U S that's referred to as the Bible Belt.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Settings
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2020 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Louisiana

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2021, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top