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Old 04-18-2010, 02:25 AM
 
Location: Bossier City, LA
8 posts, read 29,590 times
Reputation: 16

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Innotech View Post
Drive through daiquiri shops definitely makes it different too. I was amazed how many states dont allow you to walk around outside with an alcoholic drink. You cant even go outside of a restaurant with a cup of wine. Here it feels so natural to do that.
You can't walk around in Bossier with a with a drink, lol, pfff that new orleans all the way man, that's why we all love new orleans.
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Old 04-18-2010, 06:55 AM
 
Location: City of Central
1,845 posts, read 3,828,928 times
Reputation: 949
Quote:
Originally Posted by southbossiermtd View Post
You can't walk around in Bossier with a with a drink, lol, pfff that new orleans all the way man, that's why we all love new orleans.
Not all of us .
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Old 04-19-2010, 11:54 AM
 
Location: Ferndale, MI
85 posts, read 307,976 times
Reputation: 55
Default Lonely planets description of Louisiana

Thank you all very much for your insight into Louisiana culture. I have been reseraching this topic some more on the 'net and here is what lonely planet, the famous travel guide says about Louisiana culture: Louisiana Travel Information and Travel Guide - USA - Lonely Planet

This pretty much echos what y'all have been posting here.
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Old 04-19-2010, 08:40 PM
 
Location: Southeast Arizona
3,230 posts, read 4,311,354 times
Reputation: 2187
Louisiana is in the South, where sweet tea, grits, chitlins, great friendly folks and good BBQ are still the norm. But Louisiana has it's extra sense of flair because of the Cajuns (did a college project on them, they sound like a great proud bunch! ) and the city of New Orleans (I've always wanted to see the French Quarter), that is what makes it unique to the south.

I read somewhere on the net once, "Louisiana is the 'deepest south' you can get in the Deep South".
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Old 04-19-2010, 11:48 PM
 
Location: Lafayette, Louisiana
14,089 posts, read 24,376,722 times
Reputation: 8002
Quote:
Originally Posted by Desert kid View Post
Louisiana is in the South, where sweet tea, grits, chitlins, great friendly folks and good BBQ are still the norm. But Louisiana has it's extra sense of flair because of the Cajuns (did a college project on them, they sound like a great proud bunch! ) and the city of New Orleans (I've always wanted to see the French Quarter), that is what makes it unique to the south.

I read somewhere on the net once, "Louisiana is the 'deepest south' you can get in the Deep South".
Much like Italy, Louisiana has it's own distinct regional culture. The culture lines tend to blur around the borders of regions and states. Contrary to what some believe, the state isn't all swamps and marsh lands. I live in Cajun Country and there's a blend of French (Acadians), Spanish, native American, German, African, and other cultures blended in this area. Some towns celebrate traditional Mardi Gras the very old ways by getting into traditional costumes like those seen in 17 or 1800 France with the tall pointed hat and mask, they ride on horse back going door to door asking for food for the feast. People will donate items, usually a chicken or pig that the costumed revelers must catch after running in the mud. The food and riders arrive at a central location where the food is cooked, a band plays music, and people eat and dance. My only problem with this is the excessive amount of drinking. The festivals go on all over the place and are pretty much the same thing. A festival for food with good food served, good dance music played, and other activities going on.

At one time in Cajun history people tried to hide the fact that they were eating crawfish because it was seen as an embarassment or a sign you were poor. Eventually, we got over this shame and said "what the hell". Now there are many other places in the world that also eat crawfish including parts of Asia and France. The Acadian people who came here were hunters, fishermen, and farmers. They continued their trades when they arrived here. Swamps, ponds, lakes, and the Gulf of Mexico provided plenty of fishing and some hunting. Some in my family still go fishing and bring their hunting guns with them just in case. They tell the game warden it's in case of a gator attack. Yeah right. The lands here are pretty good farm land but the weather doesn't always cooperate. Going from Lafayette and traveling north on I-49 the land starts off relatively flat and then becomes hilly. You'll notice that I-49 doesn't run in a straight line. It was a running joke that for every curve you hit on I-49, that was a politician or a politician's friend/family property. Once you get around Alexandria and on north, the hills get bigger and the timber industry takes over. What's amazing is if you do a google earth satellite image of many cities around here, you'll mostly see trees. Go ahead and look at Lafayette, Louisiana and you'll see lot's of trees. We'd like more if we could,...especially Evangeline Oak trees. They are absolutely beautiful. Problem is one full tree takes up just about the same land as one house because it grows outward instead of upward.
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Old 04-21-2010, 04:37 AM
 
1,113 posts, read 2,004,015 times
Reputation: 831
We were different than mainstream America. Not anymore.

All your kids have turned into mall rat cellphone addicted entitlement generation rugrats.

It isn't what it used to be down here and it is because of you.
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Old 04-21-2010, 07:57 AM
 
Location: Monroe!
430 posts, read 339,636 times
Reputation: 216
Then you add the old government that governs us to act accordingly "crazy". People in California think we still ride horse and travel by steamboat, and thats not joking, they really believe that.
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Old 04-22-2010, 09:47 AM
 
1,320 posts, read 3,259,245 times
Reputation: 941
I went to college in Monroe and my roomate was from New Iberia. The two places couldn't be more different. I always considered N Lousiana more like other parts of the south. S Louisiana indeed has tons of Cajun culture. This does not make anything wrong with North La. But it is a state with two different states in my opinion(oh, I am a yankee, so bash me if you want!) Louisiana became, and still is one of my favorites...
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Old 04-24-2010, 08:17 PM
 
Location: Covington, La
10 posts, read 29,408 times
Reputation: 14
Hopefully all the false rumors of how "weird" we are will keep the freaks away.

I feel for all the people in Idaho, Montana and Utah...being over run with a bunch of Cali-commies.

As for if we're different than "mainstream" America... Depends. I've lived in several states, but grew up and am originally from Louisiana. I think the friendliness of everyone here surpasses anywhere else. I like the fact that it's normal for someone to drink a beer at dinner or while doing yard work. Or if you're in the neighborhood, to just drop by without calling. In Illinois, you practically have to schedule an appointment with people before dropping by.

I think in general a lot of the "fly-over" states share a lot of the same values and mores.
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Old 04-28-2010, 08:54 PM
 
1,113 posts, read 2,004,015 times
Reputation: 831
I've lived in quite a few different cities across the USA and another country for a while and I can say with some amount of experience that YES, Southern Louisiana is different than anywhere I have ever been.

When you get north of Mamou... it could easily be Texas or Mississippi folks.

Acadiana and New Orleans regions are not like mainstream America.
Well, it used to not be. Things tend to change.

For all I know it has turned into yuppie central and they all walk around glued to a cell phone.

Back in the old days we'd go Delbert McClinton or Clifton Chenier at Jay's in Cankton.

These days they likely listen to trance under a disco ball in a downtown club?

Merely a guess.
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