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Old 03-24-2011, 06:42 PM
 
Location: New Albany, Indiana (Greater Louisville)
11,106 posts, read 23,012,193 times
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Percent growth by decade
2000s: 13.6%
1990s: 10.0%
1980s: 5.1%
1970s: 4.4%
1960s: 19.6%

Louisville

Time to take out some Mint Julips and celebrate
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Old 03-24-2011, 06:53 PM
 
6,999 posts, read 15,133,604 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by censusdata View Post
Percent growth by decade
2000s: 13.6%
1990s: 10.0%
1980s: 5.1%
1970s: 4.4%
1960s: 19.6%

Louisville

Time to take out some Mint Julips and celebrate
I have been saying this for awhile and I still think it is undercounted. Why was Scott County IN removed?

I would like to see a stat that compares the Louisville MSA in terms of square miles of land (without water) to neighboring MSAs. I think Louisville is much bigger, even in MSA, than even its residents realize. I believe the city is getting discovered, if only it can attract more high paying jobs I think it will see Nashville or Charlotte style growth in the next 20 years.
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Old 03-24-2011, 07:40 PM
 
Location: Floyd County, IN
23,171 posts, read 40,237,553 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stx12499 View Post
I have been saying this for awhile and I still think it is undercounted. Why was Scott County IN removed?

I would like to see a stat that compares the Louisville MSA in terms of square miles of land (without water) to neighboring MSAs. I think Louisville is much bigger, even in MSA, than even its residents realize. I believe the city is getting discovered, if only it can attract more high paying jobs I think it will see Nashville or Charlotte style growth in the next 20 years.
Being "discovered" always means rapidly increasing costs. However, higher educational attainment would lead to higher paying jobs with the ancillary rise in the tax base. This would lend improvement to desparately help the aging infrastructure that can't handle much in the way of rapid unplanned growth. I did notice another New Jersey license plate today which I found scary because it was a Land Rover
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Old 03-24-2011, 09:01 PM
 
6,999 posts, read 15,133,604 times
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Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
Being "discovered" always means rapidly increasing costs. However, higher educational attainment would lead to higher paying jobs with the ancillary rise in the tax base. This would lend improvement to desparately help the aging infrastructure that can't handle much in the way of rapid unplanned growth. I did notice another New Jersey license plate today which I found scary because it was a Land Rover
whats wrong with a land rover?
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Old 03-25-2011, 01:45 AM
 
907 posts, read 1,770,983 times
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I think louisville will have very steady growth for at least the next decade. It's a nice mix of Midwestern and Southern, and because of that it has a diversified economy that protects it against the woes that the purely Midwestern cities have. It has easy access to other cities with healthy economies (Indy, Nashville, St Louis) and is close to other cities that have dying economies that will attract residents from those cities looking for jobs (Dayton, Cleveland, Toledo, Detroit).

I don't see it developing into a hypergrowth city for one reason: Kentucky. The tax structure and business friendliness of adjacent Tennessee is, unfortunatley, vastly superior to Kentucky. That is going to continue to attract small business owners and corporate headquarters. It also give existing small business more capital to expand.
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Old 03-25-2011, 10:43 AM
 
Location: New Albany, Indiana (Greater Louisville)
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Actually when you take into account that the national population growth slowed down Louisville's growth is even more impressive. The metro grew 10% in the 90s, compared with a national rate of 13.6%. In the 2ks the metro grew 13.6% while the nation only grew 9.7%. Ditto for NKY and Lex for maintaining their high growth rates in the same circumstances

I'll be interested to see if some of the gentrified neighborhoods added population.
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Old 03-25-2011, 03:56 PM
 
6,999 posts, read 15,133,604 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hey_Hey View Post
I think louisville will have very steady growth for at least the next decade. It's a nice mix of Midwestern and Southern, and because of that it has a diversified economy that protects it against the woes that the purely Midwestern cities have. It has easy access to other cities with healthy economies (Indy, Nashville, St Louis) and is close to other cities that have dying economies that will attract residents from those cities looking for jobs (Dayton, Cleveland, Toledo, Detroit).

I don't see it developing into a hypergrowth city for one reason: Kentucky. The tax structure and business friendliness of adjacent Tennessee is, unfortunatley, vastly superior to Kentucky. That is going to continue to attract small business owners and corporate headquarters. It also give existing small business more capital to expand.
What needs to happen is KY as a state needs to change its ways. The leaders in Frankfort lead with an agrarian mindset. If they would wake up, they would realize the rural areas of TN and NC are doing just as well as the cities and KY could do the same. While Appalchain KY loses population, the same mountainous area in TN gains population. There is no excuse why Ky does not support its cities, ESPECIALLY Louisville. Also, the state needs a place that is the antithesis of Gatlinberg in the mountains. The state is simply missing out on tons of tourism and maintains a backwards rep as a "southern state" whereas TN and NC are viewed as growing and progressive.
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Old 03-28-2011, 07:57 AM
 
583 posts, read 814,586 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stx12499 View Post
I have been saying this for awhile and I still think it is undercounted. Why was Scott County IN removed?

I would like to see a stat that compares the Louisville MSA in terms of square miles of land (without water) to neighboring MSAs. I think Louisville is much bigger, even in MSA, than even its residents realize. I believe the city is getting discovered, if only it can attract more high paying jobs I think it will see Nashville or Charlotte style growth in the next 20 years.
But be careful. People often come to an area with bad ideas. I like Louisville because that city has shown me a better way than what other cities are doing. Short of putting in a beach and palm trees, I can't think of how I'd improve Louisville.

If too many people come, someone will think that a five-story apartment block needs to be erected right on Bardstown Road, and then the whole vibe is destroyed and Louisville is gone.

You do not want a bunch of superficial iphone, Panera and Starbucks dilettantes. That lot invaded Chicago about 20 years ago, and now Chicago, as a place with a distinct identity, is lost.

Just how big do you think the metro area is, these days?
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Old 03-28-2011, 08:04 AM
 
583 posts, read 814,586 times
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Originally Posted by stx12499 View Post
TN and NC are viewed as growing and progressive.
TN, no. Never. Nobody ever pairs 'progressive' to "Tennessee'. Plus, progressives usually destroy everywhere they go.

NC, yes, because it gets a lot of East Coast detritus drifting down, and wherever East Coast people are, they boast of it being the locus of the universe. Asheville has a vibe, I guess, but Charlotte is dead boring
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Old 03-28-2011, 01:40 PM
 
Location: "Daytonnati"
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Quote:
If too many people come, someone will think that a five-story apartment block needs to be erected right on Bardstown Road, and then the whole vibe is destroyed and Louisville is gone.
Believe it or not you are seeing a bit of this, already.

Quote:
You do not want a bunch of superficial iphone, Panera and Starbucks dilettantes.
You got this crowd in Louisville, but they do their lifestyle consumption in local places.
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