U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Kentucky > Louisville area
 [Register]
Louisville area Jefferson County
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 10-17-2007, 10:17 AM
 
809 posts, read 2,259,329 times
Reputation: 328

Advertisements

So, I'm close to graduating college and looking to head on over to UL for grad school. I want to know a few things about Louisville (the city).

I'm originally from Pittsburgh, and I love urban environments, walk ability, culture, liberalism, and I don't mind a little grit. At the same time, I always cherished the Mountains and greenspace that Pittsburgh has. Is Louisville in the Appalachians (or at least close to them?)

Pittsburgh is also very friendly for a big city, and often called a "Big Little City," does Louisville also give off that vibe?

Also, how are the winters? Dry winters with no snow are depressing! Humid winters with snow, even if a little colder, are more my style.

Thanks!
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-17-2007, 10:35 AM
 
2,105 posts, read 6,365,271 times
Reputation: 1527
No, Louisville isn't really close to the Appalachians. About 2 hours east, you start to get into some pretty hilly and rugged terrain, like Red River Gorge. But you have to go about 3 hours to truly start to get to real mountains (by eastern US standards).

Louisville has a great public park system. Cherokee and Seneca parks are right in the city and really nice with lots of giant trees, biking and jogging paths.

I think Louisville is a friendly city, with lots of nice older neighborhoods that feel tight knit and unique.

Winters are moderate. Louisville has 4 almost equally divided seasons. Typically, there is one good snowfall of 6" or so each year, with several small ones. Every few years, a big storm will come through and dump 12" or more, causing a lot of fun and chaos. Snow doesn't typically stick around though, the majority will usually melt off within a week or so.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-17-2007, 10:49 AM
 
Location: Queens, NY
49 posts, read 44,009 times
Reputation: 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by gameguy56 View Post
So, I'm close to graduating college and looking to head on over to UL for grad school. I want to know a few things about Louisville (the city).

I'm originally from Pittsburgh, and I love urban environments, walk ability, culture, liberalism, and I don't mind a little grit. At the same time, I always cherished the Mountains and greenspace that Pittsburgh has. Is Louisville in the Appalachians (or at least close to them?)

Pittsburgh is also very friendly for a big city, and often called a "Big Little City," does Louisville also give off that vibe?

Also, how are the winters? Dry winters with no snow are depressing! Humid winters with snow, even if a little colder, are more my style.

Thanks!
Hey Gameguy, Appalachian mountains are actually far eastern Kentucky..close to West Virginia so no there not close to here. However, Louisville has a ton of parks like Cherokee and Seneca that's quite popular with walkers/joggers/bicyclists (I know it doesn't make up for mountains but its something).
Culture, as far as the arts go, we have the Louisville Actor's Theater, Kentucky Center for the Arts, The Louisville Orchestra (which has been through a lot financially), Kentucky Ballet, Glassworks and other smaller venues that put on shows/create art and what not.
Walk Ability...that's another issue, other than downtown Louisville and the Highlands (on Bardstown Rd.) most places require a car/bus..and truthfully public transit is not good here beyond downtown, U of L, and the Highlands (TARC).
A lot of people in Louisville are friendly, many will greet you when you cross paths. And Louisville doesn't have a lot of urban environments outside of downtown Louisville (which is small) and a few other areas scattered around the city.
Now let's get to the weather....hmmm. Louisville's weather is very unpredictable, a few years back the temperatures hit 70 degrees in December and 30 degrees in June! But USUALLY, we have a lot of humidity in the summer (I mean, 90 degrees with humidity around the same if not higher) and its actually caused a few people I've talked to to go to the hospital because of their breathing (especially when moving to Louisville from far less humid cities with less pollution). Winter is winter, but it seems to be getting shorter with summer temps lasting longer. Temperatures are normally in the 30's, rarely dropping below zero.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-17-2007, 03:10 PM
 
6,973 posts, read 15,098,362 times
Reputation: 3404
Quote:
Originally Posted by gameguy56 View Post
So, I'm close to graduating college and looking to head on over to UL for grad school. I want to know a few things about Louisville (the city).

I'm originally from Pittsburgh, and I love urban environments, walk ability, culture, liberalism, and I don't mind a little grit. At the same time, I always cherished the Mountains and greenspace that Pittsburgh has. Is Louisville in the Appalachians (or at least close to them?)

Pittsburgh is also very friendly for a big city, and often called a "Big Little City," does Louisville also give off that vibe?

Also, how are the winters? Dry winters with no snow are depressing! Humid winters with snow, even if a little colder, are more my style.

Thanks!
Louisville is three hours west of the Appalachains. That does not mean it is flat here, though. The topography is rolling hills outside the relatively flat downtown and west end areas. There are even some big hills that would remind you of some Pittsburgh type topography around Iroquois Park on the southside and along the Ohio River in the NE part of the city. Also, S. Indiana around Floyds Knobs has some pretty steep hills and some homes with panoramic views of the city like on skyline drive in Floyds Knobs, IN. With the river and the friendliness, it is definitely a "small big city" and it will probably remind you of a Pittsburgh with a smaller skyline and less suburbs.

I strongly disagree with the above poster who claimed downtown is the only urban part of the city. There are three key pedestrian, restaurant, and nightlife corridors where young professionals mix with eclectics and you can find families with strollers next to teenage skateboarders next to yuppies out for coffee.

1) Bardstown Road (aka Highlands). This is the upscale version of Pittsburgh's Southside. Located on a 400 acre Olmstead designed park, you will find single family mansions from the turn of the century and a few highrise condo buildings. There are not as many bars as you would find in the Southside of Pittsburgh, but three miles of Bardstown Road has about 30 bars. There is a local tradition called the Bambi Walk where you walk to each one and take a drink. The area contains upscale restaurants, ethnic eats, and great locally owned bookstores, women's boutiques, sushi bars, and antiques, and coffee shops. There are a couple incredible indie record stores as well as guitar shops, used video game and CD stores, and much much more. Unique restaurants like Seviche abound. This area has a mix of young professionals, grunge, punk, tattoo shops, and even families with kids (often enrolled in one of teh many Catholic schools) in the historic mansions around Cherokee Road and Spring drive. Many yuppies live in Condos around Cherokee Road and Highland Ave, and there is a nice concentration of bars in the 900 Block of Baxter avenue. Molly Malone's and O'shea's are some great summer and warm weather favorites.

2)Frankfort Ave (aka Clifton and Crescent Hill to the heart of St Matthews). This is a quieter, more quait version of Bardstown Rd. Nestled next to some train tracks, this very historic area is home to a mix of long time elderly residents, a few working class, and a strong and growing concentration of young professionals and young couples in some of the new condo developments and rehabbed old buildings. Nearby, parts of lower Brownsboro Rd. have some new immigrants as well as an older "redneck" type population. The restaurants in this corridor are arguably some of the best in the city: L&N Wine Bar, Maido, Osaka, Volare, Irish Rover, Varanese, Porcini, Basa, Bourbon's Bistro...the list goes on and on. One of my favorite spots is a small Filipino place called Sari Sari. At the southern terminus of Frankfort, it meets Shelbyville Road, Chenoweth Lane, Lexington Road and Breckenridge lane in an area known as the "heart of St Matthews." This area is close to many hospitals and home to many young professionals in their late 20's and early thirties in apartment complexes like Mallard Crossing. The actual intersection of the above roads is very walkable, and there are shops and restaurants of all sorts in the area. There are about eight bars at this crossroads, and Brendan's and Saints are popular with the young professional crowd. The crowds in here tend to be more late twenties and thirties and up at night.

3) Downtown. Although smaller than downtown Pittsburgh, it is more pedestrian friendly and growing much faster. It is also much more vibrant at night, especially fourth street on Saturdays. Overall, you will find a much healthier economy in Louisville as well. To give you an idea of the growth occuring downtown, here are some major projects going up (not counting the countless smaller condo/hotel/office construction):

Museum Plaza
Iron Quarter | Louisville, KY
Louisville Arena Authority
RiverPark Louisville Kentucky, Lofts and Luxury Condos
The Cordish Company

Downtown, 4th street, West Main, and East Market streets are pretty walkable, but the above projects will fill in the gaps. This event on the First friday of the month is a great time to check out downtown and meet artistic minded people over free wine at Red Tree Gallery:

First Friday Gallery/Trolley Hop

Waterfront Park is a world class park named a top 10 urban park, not unlike the park on the three rivers in Pitt.

Welcome to Waterfront Park!

Whew...thats alot! But there is more. There is a growing movement of younger people and younger families moving to Germantown, which is an area just five minutes west of Bardstown Road. The homes are more affordable and the area is know for its corner taverns not unlike working class areas of Pittsburgh. Further west, there is Old Louisville, which is similar demographically to the area in Pittsburgh around Pitt and Carngie Mellon. The area does not have too much in the way of commercial activity, but the University of Louisville is in the area and adds some vibrancy as well as some undergrad parties, Granville bar on Thursday night, and quite possibly one of the finest restaurants in the Southern US:

Welcome to 610 Magnolia

Old Louisville has beautiful old mansions but also a higher crime rate. Most crime is petty or car break ins, and assaults aren't too common. There has been some recent problems with drug dealing and prostitution at the corner of 4th and Oak, but compared to Pitt, I believe these problems to be miniscule. The area west of 7th/9th street is generally considered the ghetto area, and there is no reason to explore that region, although it is not dangerous to drive through during the day. There is some beautiful architecure on Northwestern Parkway, though. Likewise, downtown New Albany and Jeffersonville, IN are historic and have reviving downtowns, but are nowhere near vibrant yet. Overall, Louisville is a cleaner city than Pittsburgh with less grit, although being a historic river city as well with an industrial history, you will find a good deal of grit in parts.

I have been meaning to write a comprehensive review of the city so I will be saving this and adding to it for others.

Last edited by Peter1948; 10-17-2007 at 03:27 PM..
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-17-2007, 07:10 PM
 
809 posts, read 2,259,329 times
Reputation: 328
Quote:
Originally Posted by stx12499 View Post
Louisville is three hours west of the Appalachains. That does not mean it is flat here, though. The topography is rolling hills outside the relatively flat downtown and west end areas. There are even some big hills that would remind you of some Pittsburgh type topography around Iroquois Park on the southside and along the Ohio River in the NE part of the city. Also, S. Indiana around Floyds Knobs has some pretty steep hills and some homes with panoramic views of the city like on skyline drive in Floyds Knobs, IN. With the river and the friendliness, it is definitely a "small big city" and it will probably remind you of a Pittsburgh with a smaller skyline and less suburbs.

I strongly disagree with the above poster who claimed downtown is the only urban part of the city. There are three key pedestrian, restaurant, and nightlife corridors where young professionals mix with eclectics and you can find families with strollers next to teenage skateboarders next to yuppies out for coffee.

1) Bardstown Road (aka Highlands). This is the upscale version of Pittsburgh's Southside. Located on a 400 acre Olmstead designed park, you will find single family mansions from the turn of the century and a few highrise condo buildings. There are not as many bars as you would find in the Southside of Pittsburgh, but three miles of Bardstown Road has about 30 bars. There is a local tradition called the Bambi Walk where you walk to each one and take a drink. The area contains upscale restaurants, ethnic eats, and great locally owned bookstores, women's boutiques, sushi bars, and antiques, and coffee shops. There are a couple incredible indie record stores as well as guitar shops, used video game and CD stores, and much much more. Unique restaurants like Seviche abound. This area has a mix of young professionals, grunge, punk, tattoo shops, and even families with kids (often enrolled in one of teh many Catholic schools) in the historic mansions around Cherokee Road and Spring drive. Many yuppies live in Condos around Cherokee Road and Highland Ave, and there is a nice concentration of bars in the 900 Block of Baxter avenue. Molly Malone's and O'shea's are some great summer and warm weather favorites.

2)Frankfort Ave (aka Clifton and Crescent Hill to the heart of St Matthews). This is a quieter, more quait version of Bardstown Rd. Nestled next to some train tracks, this very historic area is home to a mix of long time elderly residents, a few working class, and a strong and growing concentration of young professionals and young couples in some of the new condo developments and rehabbed old buildings. Nearby, parts of lower Brownsboro Rd. have some new immigrants as well as an older "redneck" type population. The restaurants in this corridor are arguably some of the best in the city: L&N Wine Bar, Maido, Osaka, Volare, Irish Rover, Varanese, Porcini, Basa, Bourbon's Bistro...the list goes on and on. One of my favorite spots is a small Filipino place called Sari Sari. At the southern terminus of Frankfort, it meets Shelbyville Road, Chenoweth Lane, Lexington Road and Breckenridge lane in an area known as the "heart of St Matthews." This area is close to many hospitals and home to many young professionals in their late 20's and early thirties in apartment complexes like Mallard Crossing. The actual intersection of the above roads is very walkable, and there are shops and restaurants of all sorts in the area. There are about eight bars at this crossroads, and Brendan's and Saints are popular with the young professional crowd. The crowds in here tend to be more late twenties and thirties and up at night.

3) Downtown. Although smaller than downtown Pittsburgh, it is more pedestrian friendly and growing much faster. It is also much more vibrant at night, especially fourth street on Saturdays. Overall, you will find a much healthier economy in Louisville as well. To give you an idea of the growth occuring downtown, here are some major projects going up (not counting the countless smaller condo/hotel/office construction):

Museum Plaza
Iron Quarter | Louisville, KY
Louisville Arena Authority
RiverPark Louisville Kentucky, Lofts and Luxury Condos
The Cordish Company

Downtown, 4th street, West Main, and East Market streets are pretty walkable, but the above projects will fill in the gaps. This event on the First friday of the month is a great time to check out downtown and meet artistic minded people over free wine at Red Tree Gallery:

First Friday Gallery/Trolley Hop

Waterfront Park is a world class park named a top 10 urban park, not unlike the park on the three rivers in Pitt.

Welcome to Waterfront Park!

Whew...thats alot! But there is more. There is a growing movement of younger people and younger families moving to Germantown, which is an area just five minutes west of Bardstown Road. The homes are more affordable and the area is know for its corner taverns not unlike working class areas of Pittsburgh. Further west, there is Old Louisville, which is similar demographically to the area in Pittsburgh around Pitt and Carngie Mellon. The area does not have too much in the way of commercial activity, but the University of Louisville is in the area and adds some vibrancy as well as some undergrad parties, Granville bar on Thursday night, and quite possibly one of the finest restaurants in the Southern US:

Welcome to 610 Magnolia

Old Louisville has beautiful old mansions but also a higher crime rate. Most crime is petty or car break ins, and assaults aren't too common. There has been some recent problems with drug dealing and prostitution at the corner of 4th and Oak, but compared to Pitt, I believe these problems to be miniscule. The area west of 7th/9th street is generally considered the ghetto area, and there is no reason to explore that region, although it is not dangerous to drive through during the day. There is some beautiful architecure on Northwestern Parkway, though. Likewise, downtown New Albany and Jeffersonville, IN are historic and have reviving downtowns, but are nowhere near vibrant yet. Overall, Louisville is a cleaner city than Pittsburgh with less grit, although being a historic river city as well with an industrial history, you will find a good deal of grit in parts.

I have been meaning to write a comprehensive review of the city so I will be saving this and adding to it for others.
Thank you thank you thank you! That's really the vibe I'm looking for. Could you expand on how the winters are in Louisville? I'm used to a ton of humidity and rather prefer it in almost all seasons to dry weather.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-17-2007, 08:52 PM
 
6,973 posts, read 15,098,362 times
Reputation: 3404
Louisville is much warmer than Pittsburgh and generally extremely humid about 4-6 months a year.

Average Weather for Louisville, KY - Temperature and Precipitation

You can believe all the heresay you want, but your best bet on climate data is the actual facts. Weather.com has accurate data. On average, Louisville will be 5-10 degrees warmer than any given day in Pittsburgh, and even more so in the winter. Louisville gets less slow, and virtually no Lake Effect snow as it is too far south. It really is a city with 4 seasons, although summer seems to have lasted almost six months this year with 90's and 100's persisting since April or May. we have even had 90's this month and lots of 80's. It is 76 and humid right now, about 12 degrees warmer than the temp in Pitt. It was the hottest summer on record in the city. Again, look at climate data. Louisville is known for being fairly humid, but not like the Gulf Coast.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-17-2007, 09:30 PM
 
Location: Blankity-blank!
11,449 posts, read 15,221,879 times
Reputation: 6932
Here I am again!
I thought I'd put in a good word for Louisville's Iroquois Park. It's a large park on the south side and elevated with nice views from the top. Not being very crowded it's a pleasant place to spend a few hours.
About a one hour drive (south toward Fort Knox) one can be in Otter Creek Park. It's much larger, with a campground and trails thru the woods.
The Red River Gorge, in Daniel Boone National Forest, is a terrific place to spend several days. Plenty of scenic views from high cliffs, natural bridges, hiking trails, and many places where you can get away from the crowds. For boating, fishing, camping, swimming, Cave Run Lake (also in the Daniel Boone National Forest) is a great place for a few days. Both are about 2 1/2 hours (not exceeding the speed limit of 70mph) from Louisville.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-17-2007, 09:48 PM
 
6,973 posts, read 15,098,362 times
Reputation: 3404
Quote:
Originally Posted by Visvaldis View Post
Here I am again!
I thought I'd put in a good word for Louisville's Iroquois Park. It's a large park on the south side and elevated with nice views from the top. Not being very crowded it's a pleasant place to spend a few hours.
About a one hour drive (south toward Fort Knox) one can be in Otter Creek Park. It's much larger, with a campground and trails thru the woods.
The Red River Gorge, in Daniel Boone National Forest, is a terrific place to spend several days. Plenty of scenic views from high cliffs, natural bridges, hiking trails, and many places where you can get away from the crowds. For boating, fishing, camping, swimming, Cave Run Lake (also in the Daniel Boone National Forest) is a great place for a few days. Both are about 2 1/2 hours (not exceeding the speed limit of 70mph) from Louisville.

Irouqouis Park..the Southern gem in the Olmstead necklace. With a wide open area and rolling hills, this park is underused by those outside the south end. It has a great outdoor amphitheatre as well and even gets a couple national concerts sometimes. If you dont believe there are hills here, check this skyline view from the top of one in Iroquois Park:

Louisville Skyline from Iroqoius Park photo - Abdul Sharif photos at pbase.com

Louisville Sparkling in the Night photo - Abdul Sharif photos at pbase.com
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-18-2007, 12:10 AM
 
809 posts, read 2,259,329 times
Reputation: 328
Also, how is the market for tech/IT jobs? I know that Jeffersonville has a US Census Branch and I might consider working there if I can get that job.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-22-2007, 03:37 PM
 
6,973 posts, read 15,098,362 times
Reputation: 3404
Quote:
Originally Posted by gameguy56 View Post
Also, how is the market for tech/IT jobs? I know that Jeffersonville has a US Census Branch and I might consider working there if I can get that job.
Hmm, I am not sure, but probably decent. The job market here is stable in most fileds, and growing in others. I hear the Census Bureau is a nice place to work.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Settings
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2020 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Kentucky > Louisville area

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2021, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top