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Old 02-23-2015, 10:11 PM
 
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Originally Posted by ServoMiff View Post
I grew up in Louisville and just spent a very snowy and ice slushy weekend there while going to a game at the Yum Center and visiting family.

Generally speaking, Louisville is an industrial city. Yes there are white collar jobs, but the unemployment rate for those jobs is incredibly low and they don't bring in enough jobs of that type (above $75k) to entice more white collar people to move here. Ford and UPS are 2 major employers in the area, and those are mostly manufacturing and package handling jobs.

My take on Louisville as a whole is that it, like most metro cities, leans left, but the entire state is very red as a whole. From a socioeconomic standpoint, it tends to skew towards the lower end of the spectrum - generally less educated and worldly, and thus less economically affluent. The East end is decidedly the opposite - this is where the majority of the city's wealth resides. The East and Northeast parts of Jefferson County and into Oldham County now as well. Oldham was mainly farmland and riverfront housing when I was growing up. That's not exclusively the case anymore.

Despite the above, the city features a lot of unique aspects. There are plenty of the younger/hipster generation who provide a great local social scene - and while downtown isn't exactly the hippest of areas, it still has something to offer everyone. The biggest takeaway for me, and what amazes many newbies to the 'ville, is how incredibly genuine and friendly the majority of the populace is, and you can see the active diversity in the city as well, which is something I value. I've noticed more interracial couples in Louisville than I have anywhere else, and I now live in SAN FRANCISCO! Yes, there are idiot racists everywhere, but I truly feel like racial tolerance is quite high in Louisville, with some nominal exceptions. The overall friendliness of everyone is a major draw to some, including myself. It always feels like home when I return.

Kinda sandwiching though, the biggest issue I have with Louisville is the education gap, because it does hurt the area, in my opinion. You don't have too many overly scholarly people, but there are plenty of not just undereducated, but completely uneducated. It's not a racial thing, it's a socioeconomic thing, as the majority of issues I ran into while living there came from really low class white people (and I say this as a white person myself).

This bears out with the college rivalries - Louisville being the urban school and localized mainly to the city and surrounding counties for its fanbase, while Kentucky fans tend to be in Lexington as well as every other county outside of the Louisville and surrounding area (though there are probably about 35% or so of the Jefferson County area that are blue) - who seem to be people who never set foot on a college campus before other than the sports facilities - basketball is ingrained in people there, and I believe this is what makes the two schools despise each other so much. The racial issues with Kentucky's former basketball coach (see the movie Glory Road for an accurate description), versus the inner city school which has a significant African-American base of fans.

I'm a Louisville fan and my mother is a Kentucky fan - we've been over this for decades. I don't miss interacting with the majority of the UK fanbase, and although it's not the reason I left (I left for college in 1998 and haven't found a good paying job in my industry that fit my skills since then - and am quite happy in CA) I am thankful I don't have to deal with that anymore - especially right now. UK81's comment is indicative of the overall opinion - brag, but act like you're being humble in the process. I'm not saying UK81 is specifically acting that way - I'm just offering my experience from other fans I've dealt with over the years who have said similar things.

Anyhow - if you can handle the sports aspect, or can distance yourself from it - I think Louisville is a fantastic city that has much more to offer than the surrounding metro cities (Cincy, Indy, Nashville and St Louis)

Thanks Servo. A very fair and sound judgment. Although I think that if I gave you a tour...you would see Louisville is a bit more "hip", "progressive," and "urban" than you think.
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Old 02-24-2015, 02:13 PM
 
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Hi this is my first post here, and I have lived in Louisville for over 3 years now. I used to live in Bloomington, Indiana (where IU is located) and grew up close to Chicago. I think most of the posters have done a great job of describing Louisville's mixture in political leanings, education disparity, etc. I just want to say the city is very Outdoorsy and is becoming even more so. Cherokee and Iroquois park being obvious highlights, but there is also the Parklands of Floyds Fork which is combining 4 existing parks (to account for almost 4,000 acres) with major bike paths, picnic areas, and various kayak/canoe routes. The rivalry between UK and U of L fans is childish and extremely obnoxious to be honest, but you learn to ignore it. At least the love and availability of great bourbon and other spirits make it more tolerable.

The large posts have been great, but I want to disagree slightly with one of the last posters. Louisville has 3 Fortune 500 companies (1 of which is a Fortune 100), and they are Humana (#73), Kindred Healthcare, and Yum Brands (aka Taco Bell, Pizza Hut, and KFC). There are some other major employers as well like UPS, Ford, GE (although recently bought out), and Brown-Forman (Fortune 1000 and make Jack Daniels, Southern Comfort, Woodford Reserve, etc.) There are a lot of healthcare jobs with Baptist hospitals, Norton Healthcare, Kentucky One Health, Anthem, and Pharmerica (Fortune 1000).
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Old 02-24-2015, 03:36 PM
 
Location: IL/IN/FL/CA/KY/FL/KY/WA
1,265 posts, read 1,423,424 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter1948 View Post
Thanks Servo. A very fair and sound judgment. Although I think that if I gave you a tour...you would see Louisville is a bit more "hip", "progressive," and "urban" than you think.
Peter, I truly don't doubt you. In fact, I know it's moving more in that direction, and a lot has to do with the bourbon movement, in my opinion. Getting visitors to town allows them to see the true charm and gets them to think more seriously about relocation. However, percentage-wise it's still not yet enough to move the needle, if you catch my drift. Bloomington, IN has the lock on hip and progressive in the general vicinity, and most people outside of Louisville that I've talked to who know about midwestern mid-south towns all speak of Bloomington first as a town in the area that most reflects an area in the West like Portland. That isn't to say Louisville doesn't have some of that, but it's going to take more development and time.

I actually wanted to drive around a lot more this past weekend than I was able to due to the crappy weather. To me, the urban core is still lacking quite a bit outside of 4th St Live and the Main St area between 1st and 9th. I feel like the cool parts are more spread out than they need to be, and I'm not sure if that's a city planning issue or not.

I want Louisville to grow and succeed. I wasn't born there, but I still say it's my hometown and I am proud to have grown up there.
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Old 02-24-2015, 04:33 PM
 
Location: IL/IN/FL/CA/KY/FL/KY/WA
1,265 posts, read 1,423,424 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mdkolo View Post
Hi this is my first post here, and I have lived in Louisville for over 3 years now. I used to live in Bloomington, Indiana (where IU is located) and grew up close to Chicago. I think most of the posters have done a great job of describing Louisville's mixture in political leanings, education disparity, etc. I just want to say the city is very Outdoorsy and is becoming even more so. Cherokee and Iroquois park being obvious highlights, but there is also the Parklands of Floyds Fork which is combining 4 existing parks (to account for almost 4,000 acres) with major bike paths, picnic areas, and various kayak/canoe routes. The rivalry between UK and U of L fans is childish and extremely obnoxious to be honest, but you learn to ignore it. At least the love and availability of great bourbon and other spirits make it more tolerable.

The large posts have been great, but I want to disagree slightly with one of the last posters. Louisville has 3 Fortune 500 companies (1 of which is a Fortune 100), and they are Humana (#73), Kindred Healthcare, and Yum Brands (aka Taco Bell, Pizza Hut, and KFC). There are some other major employers as well like UPS, Ford, GE (although recently bought out), and Brown-Forman (Fortune 1000 and make Jack Daniels, Southern Comfort, Woodford Reserve, etc.) There are a lot of healthcare jobs with Baptist hospitals, Norton Healthcare, Kentucky One Health, Anthem, and Pharmerica (Fortune 1000).
Thanks for your post mdkolo. I believe you were referring to me. I didn't specify it in my earlier post, but I have mentioned this in the past - you're referencing basically 2 industries outside of what I mentioned. Foodservice/booze and Healthcare. If you don't specialize in either, then working in those industries really isn't happening. Every metro city has their share of Fortune 500 companies, but Louisville lacks diversity in their white-collar industries, much like Detroit (albeit to a much lesser degree). The Health Insurance industry is really the only true professional industry in town.

Indianapolis is significantly more diverse with their Fortune 500-1000 companies. Eli Lilly, Simon Property Group, HH Gregg, Wellpoint and Republic Airways as well as the obvious, Allison Transmission.
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Old 02-24-2015, 09:47 PM
 
7,070 posts, read 16,744,788 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ServoMiff View Post
Peter, I truly don't doubt you. In fact, I know it's moving more in that direction, and a lot has to do with the bourbon movement, in my opinion. Getting visitors to town allows them to see the true charm and gets them to think more seriously about relocation. However, percentage-wise it's still not yet enough to move the needle, if you catch my drift. Bloomington, IN has the lock on hip and progressive in the general vicinity, and most people outside of Louisville that I've talked to who know about midwestern mid-south towns all speak of Bloomington first as a town in the area that most reflects an area in the West like Portland. That isn't to say Louisville doesn't have some of that, but it's going to take more development and time.

I actually wanted to drive around a lot more this past weekend than I was able to due to the crappy weather. To me, the urban core is still lacking quite a bit outside of 4th St Live and the Main St area between 1st and 9th. I feel like the cool parts are more spread out than they need to be, and I'm not sure if that's a city planning issue or not.

I want Louisville to grow and succeed. I wasn't born there, but I still say it's my hometown and I am proud to have grown up there.
Bloomington? Meh....the entire metro area of Bloomington is smaller than just the Highlands alone...with less to do and less of a "big city" atmosphere.

The Buzz on Louisville | LouisvilleKy.gov

Top 10 Food Cities -- National Geographic Travel

Accolades and Recognitions | LouisvilleKy.gov

These are just a few of the articles....Bloomington can't hold a candle Servo and doesn't have nearly the press. Then there is Clifton, Crescent Hill, Butchertown, Old Louisville, Nulu, even New Albany and Jeffersonville have more than you could ever imagine! There is Beechmont and Germantown, St Matthews, and now Portland. The list goes on and on.

Servo, I feel strongly your impressions are based largely around visiting for a few weeks, taking a couple hours driving a few streets downtown, noticing some "gaps" from Louisville's aggressive (and awful) urban renewal programs of the 1960s, and feeling much of the CBD has a "dead" parking lot feeling. You are not incorrect, but you are also very wrong

Louisville has so many nooks and crannies, so many invigorating commercial districts, that unless you are a true urban nerd like me, you'd have no idea. 4th street live is merely the bar for the convention center...it means nothing to the culture of Louisville.

When you fly, and you can't use your iPad during take off, how many times has Bloomington been mentioned in an airline magazine? I can think of several times for Louisville, most recently....last month!

https://hub.united.com/en-us/news/co...ouisville.aspx

Servo, this magazine only profiled either world class or foodie/travel destinations. Bloomington, IN?.... is most DEFINITELY not one. in 2014, United looked at places like Portland, SF, NYC, Vegas, and the like.

Now, Bloomington is a fine town. And I get what you are saying...per capita it is a cool LITTLE foodie town that is very well educated with a nice walkable "main drag" and some decent restaurants for a small town. But that is about it. Everything else there can be found in any other university town of 100,000.

Louisville's biggest hindrance to progress is itself. And a few residents who want to go around perpetuating the myth that it is a dying , little, uneducated old industrial southern town. All those stereotypes could not be further from the truth in 2015 Louisville, and they will only fade into distant memory by 2020 IMO. Now, Louisville has plenty to work on. Chief among them is college education levels, especially compared to peer metros

http://insiderlouisville.com/metro/e...n-peer-cities/
Much of the reason for this has to do with the fact that 10% of Louisville holds a high paying Ford or UPS job that does not require college, so they did not get a degree. There are tons of Ford employees making 6 figures with only a GED and who retire by age 50 on six figure pensions with free health care and basically free everything!
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Old 02-24-2015, 09:58 PM
 
7,070 posts, read 16,744,788 times
Reputation: 3559
Quote:
Originally Posted by ServoMiff View Post
Thanks for your post mdkolo. I believe you were referring to me. I didn't specify it in my earlier post, but I have mentioned this in the past - you're referencing basically 2 industries outside of what I mentioned. Foodservice/booze and Healthcare. If you don't specialize in either, then working in those industries really isn't happening. Every metro city has their share of Fortune 500 companies, but Louisville lacks diversity in their white-collar industries, much like Detroit (albeit to a much lesser degree). The Health Insurance industry is really the only true professional industry in town.

Indianapolis is significantly more diverse with their Fortune 500-1000 companies. Eli Lilly, Simon Property Group, HH Gregg, Wellpoint and Republic Airways as well as the obvious, Allison Transmission.
Are you from Indiana? It is ok to admit Louisville is a big up and comer. While your post has some truth, it does not speak the whole truth. I would;t say Indy "blows out Louisville" in corporate HQ, although it being a bit larger city, has quite a few more white collar jobs.

For Louisville, Fortune 1000 are Humana, Yum, Kindred, Brown-Forman. Zirmed, Atria, Signature Healthcare, CafePress, Papa Johns, Texas Roadhouse, and many more are big time, formidable companies with headquarters in the city.
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Old 02-25-2015, 10:59 PM
 
Location: IL/IN/FL/CA/KY/FL/KY/WA
1,265 posts, read 1,423,424 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter1948 View Post
Are you from Indiana? It is ok to admit Louisville is a big up and comer. While your post has some truth, it does not speak the whole truth. I would;t say Indy "blows out Louisville" in corporate HQ, although it being a bit larger city, has quite a few more white collar jobs.

For Louisville, Fortune 1000 are Humana, Yum, Kindred, Brown-Forman. Zirmed, Atria, Signature Healthcare, CafePress, Papa Johns, Texas Roadhouse, and many more are big time, formidable companies with headquarters in the city.
Haha, no and you'd be surprised to learn that while I did live in the state of Indiana for 10 years, it was the 10 least enjoyable years of my life. I actually think Indy is terrible compared to Louisville. The best thing Indy has going for it against Louisville is a great (and free) art museum, paid for by Eli Lilly. In no way would I advocate for people to move to Indiana - I'm just offering the opinions of many people that I've spoken to on the west coast who know about cities and towns. People mention Bloomington and little Nashville before Louisville. I never said I agreed with that sentiment, although I do quite enjoy some Upland beer, which is nationally recognized for their sour beer.

I believe I read that Louisville article in the United magazine (although I've since switched my allegiance to American/US), and I think I even recall seeing Louisville named the #1 up and coming tourist destination a few years back.(again, mainly I believe because of the bourbon trail due to how popular it is these days)

I have a brother and sister who live in the Butchertown area, and they haven't really indicated a significant culture change. I've asked them about up and coming areas in the city and they don't seem to offer the same opinions as you are. Not that I am disagreeing with you, but do you work for the city? I'd like to hear more about how Portland is being turned around, because I only know it as a very undesirable area. I grew up being told never to wander west of 9th St in the 90's.
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Old 02-28-2015, 11:16 PM
 
7,070 posts, read 16,744,788 times
Reputation: 3559
Quote:
Originally Posted by ServoMiff View Post
Haha, no and you'd be surprised to learn that while I did live in the state of Indiana for 10 years, it was the 10 least enjoyable years of my life. I actually think Indy is terrible compared to Louisville. The best thing Indy has going for it against Louisville is a great (and free) art museum, paid for by Eli Lilly. In no way would I advocate for people to move to Indiana - I'm just offering the opinions of many people that I've spoken to on the west coast who know about cities and towns. People mention Bloomington and little Nashville before Louisville. I never said I agreed with that sentiment, although I do quite enjoy some Upland beer, which is nationally recognized for their sour beer.

I believe I read that Louisville article in the United magazine (although I've since switched my allegiance to American/US), and I think I even recall seeing Louisville named the #1 up and coming tourist destination a few years back.(again, mainly I believe because of the bourbon trail due to how popular it is these days)

I have a brother and sister who live in the Butchertown area, and they haven't really indicated a significant culture change. I've asked them about up and coming areas in the city and they don't seem to offer the same opinions as you are. Not that I am disagreeing with you, but do you work for the city? I'd like to hear more about how Portland is being turned around, because I only know it as a very undesirable area. I grew up being told never to wander west of 9th St in the 90's.
Servo...Louisville has multiple different urban hoods with alot going on. too much to mention here. Portand has a Loooooooong way to go. But there is already some really cool stuff going on. If you search my posts and follow the posts on insiderlouisville for a few months, you will see what I mean.
Portland is a 10th place hood...Louisville aleardy has 9 urban nabes that beat the pants of anything in Indy (even Broadripple) or certainly Bloomington.

Louisville is a sleeping giant. It has been dormant for nearly 100 years and she has awakened in the last 5-10...uch of it fueled by art, architecture, food, and bourbon.

And I do NOT work for the city. I am a Chicagoan by birth, but a Louisvillian at heart. And I have lived all over...with few exception, there are not hardly any better cities in its size range (maybe Austin?? Nashville or New Orleans? Portland is good clip bigger).

And if your family doesn't know about all the up and coming areas, that is because they do not know cities like I know them. In their hood alone, which is a tertiary urban nabe, places like Play lounge, Copper and Kings Distellery, Vernon Lanes, Louis' the Ton Public House, Sergio's World of Beer, and the soon to be Butchertwon Grocery are cooler than ANYTHING you would find in the entire state of Indiana. And that is just in Butchertown. Just trust me on this stuff. Should you want a tour of teh city and what is going on, PM me next time you are in.
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Old 03-02-2015, 03:26 AM
 
Location: Louisville KY
4,856 posts, read 5,823,013 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ServoMiff View Post
Haha, no and you'd be surprised to learn that while I did live in the state of Indiana for 10 years, it was the 10 least enjoyable years of my life. I actually think Indy is terrible compared to Louisville. The best thing Indy has going for it against Louisville is a great (and free) art museum, paid for by Eli Lilly. In no way would I advocate for people to move to Indiana - I'm just offering the opinions of many people that I've spoken to on the west coast who know about cities and towns. People mention Bloomington and little Nashville before Louisville. I never said I agreed with that sentiment, although I do quite enjoy some Upland beer, which is nationally recognized for their sour beer.

I believe I read that Louisville article in the United magazine (although I've since switched my allegiance to American/US), and I think I even recall seeing Louisville named the #1 up and coming tourist destination a few years back.(again, mainly I believe because of the bourbon trail due to how popular it is these days)

I have a brother and sister who live in the Butchertown area, and they haven't really indicated a significant culture change. I've asked them about up and coming areas in the city and they don't seem to offer the same opinions as you are. Not that I am disagreeing with you, but do you work for the city? I'd like to hear more about how Portland is being turned around, because I only know it as a very undesirable area. I grew up being told never to wander west of 9th St in the 90's.
There are small groups of people trying to revitalized and renew portland. The eighbourhood is a pretty poor one, but they are trying hard. A few years back they ended uo with one of the biggest krogers in the city, pretty luxurious too. There has been deconstruction along market st, there's a dollar general, a coffee house is trying to open up. I'm not a big fan of the area, but the area isn't for anyone, and if you can't relate, you won't enjoy it.
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Old 03-03-2015, 07:08 PM
 
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Louisville is full of religious fanatics and there is a lot of corruption in the local Government. If you are a woman you might as well live in Afghanistan. Women have no rights here, it is an overwhelming male dominance here. Highest teen pregnancy in the country and no one gets punished for rape. Highest child neglect and people slaughter animals in their back yards.
Never live here. That is my advice.
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