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Old 10-20-2015, 01:07 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia
49 posts, read 50,326 times
Reputation: 28

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Hello, all. I'm searching for a place to move and I narrowed it down to a few choices, Louisville included; others users have also directed me here and suggested it may be the best place for me on my list. In brief, I'm a freelancer and artist in my early 20s, a true creative type. I'm interested in getting my degree in Journalism, as well as curating and showing my work in art galleries, so good universities are important to me for moving. I currently live on the East coast, and I have several questions about the city. I appreciate all honest feedback.

I'm looking for more friendliness and affordability in a city that's welcoming to Northern transplants. I need a 1 bedroom, ideally less than $650/month since the city seems cheaper overall [?]. I have heard it's very hot and humid, but I wanted to know how severely so I can decide if it's livable for me or not; I don't mind some humidity since it can get very humid in the summer here, I just don't want to feel suffocated (I have some mild breathing problems).

I love a busy city with a LOT to do -- is Louisville usually busy and vibrant, and will living here keep boredom at bay? What's going on for artists and writers, and what are the artsy neighborhoods like? I have a car right now, but I was thinking of getting rid of it and using public transport within the next 6 months if possible, as my car is expensive...so, any info on how good the public transport is will be appreciated too.

Thanks so much.
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Old 10-20-2015, 06:10 AM
 
Location: New Albany, Indiana (Greater Louisville)
11,112 posts, read 23,019,425 times
Reputation: 11069
Weather here would be comparable to DC but with less snow. It does get very hot for a couple months in the summer but by Sept humidity starts inching downwards. A lot of people who live here have allergy issues, I don't myself. It is affordable, though rent is getting more expensive in the most desirable urban areas. You should still be able to get a good apartment in your range. The areas I'd recommend you look would be east of downtown along Baxter Ave/ Bardstown Rd (The Highlands) and Frankfort Ave (Clifton / Crescent Hill). There is a very strong presence of creative types there. Bus service there is pretty good but gets worse out towards the suburbs. Of note our main art museum is undergoing renovation and will be closed a little longer.

What other cities are you considering?

The hoagies aren't as good here lol. I have some family in Upper Darby township.
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Old 10-20-2015, 05:02 PM
 
7,000 posts, read 15,140,035 times
Reputation: 3432
Quote:
Originally Posted by nomadicheart7 View Post
Hello, all. I'm searching for a place to move and I narrowed it down to a few choices, Louisville included; others users have also directed me here and suggested it may be the best place for me on my list. In brief, I'm a freelancer and artist in my early 20s, a true creative type. I'm interested in getting my degree in Journalism, as well as curating and showing my work in art galleries, so good universities are important to me for moving. I currently live on the East coast, and I have several questions about the city. I appreciate all honest feedback.

I'm looking for more friendliness and affordability in a city that's welcoming to Northern transplants. I need a 1 bedroom, ideally less than $650/month since the city seems cheaper overall [?]. I have heard it's very hot and humid, but I wanted to know how severely so I can decide if it's livable for me or not; I don't mind some humidity since it can get very humid in the summer here, I just don't want to feel suffocated (I have some mild breathing problems).

I love a busy city with a LOT to do -- is Louisville usually busy and vibrant, and will living here keep boredom at bay? What's going on for artists and writers, and what are the artsy neighborhoods like? I have a car right now, but I was thinking of getting rid of it and using public transport within the next 6 months if possible, as my car is expensive...so, any info on how good the public transport is will be appreciated too.

Thanks so much.

yes, theres plenty to do. 650 is pretty cheap, but you can find what you need. You need to come visit the city for a week and keep an open mind and see if you like it. The city is not as 24/7 vibrant in the winter as are most northern cities, but theres is always plenty to do. do502.com has a good list of concerts/events daily.

Let me know when you visit and I will be happy to assist in your apartment search
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Old 10-21-2015, 09:42 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia
49 posts, read 50,326 times
Reputation: 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by censusdata View Post
Weather here would be comparable to DC but with less snow. It does get very hot for a couple months in the summer but by Sept humidity starts inching downwards. A lot of people who live here have allergy issues, I don't myself. It is affordable, though rent is getting more expensive in the most desirable urban areas. You should still be able to get a good apartment in your range. The areas I'd recommend you look would be east of downtown along Baxter Ave/ Bardstown Rd (The Highlands) and Frankfort Ave (Clifton / Crescent Hill). There is a very strong presence of creative types there. Bus service there is pretty good but gets worse out towards the suburbs. Of note our main art museum is undergoing renovation and will be closed a little longer.

What other cities are you considering?

The hoagies aren't as good here lol. I have some family in Upper Darby township.
No worries here about missing out on hoagies. Actually... I hate hoagies! Too onion-y...LOL!

I've been to DC a few times, once in the late spring/early summer, and it was pretty warm and humid but not too bad. I can deal with a fair amount of humidity and heat since things in Philly can get rough in the summer! The temp can get so high, 90+, and humidity is bad at times, lasting all the way into September. So honestly, I've dealt with it before, to an extent. I'm not overly worried. And at least in a quirky, cool city like Louisville, the weather is just a small drawback.

Serious question: why is it the city with the most allergies in the U.S.? I have very, very mild allergies - nothing severe enough for me to take Zyrtec, though. Have you ever heard of someone moving here and their allergies getting worse? Just curious. I don't want that to happen obviously.

I'll research the Highlands. Several users have pointed me toward looking into this area to live. Glad to know my budget is affordable. Is pet-friendly housing a lot more expensive here, if you know that by any chance?
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Old 10-21-2015, 09:48 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia
49 posts, read 50,326 times
Reputation: 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter1948 View Post
yes, theres plenty to do. 650 is pretty cheap, but you can find what you need. You need to come visit the city for a week and keep an open mind and see if you like it. The city is not as 24/7 vibrant in the winter as are most northern cities, but theres is always plenty to do. do502.com has a good list of concerts/events daily.

Let me know when you visit and I will be happy to assist in your apartment search
Thanks so much Peter. If I need help, I will message you. I'm glad my budget is affordable and there's a lot to do. Are there any art/cultural events you'd recommend going to throughout the year? How are the universities and colleges in the city?
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Old 10-21-2015, 10:27 AM
 
Location: IL/IN/FL/CA/KY/FL/KY/WA
1,252 posts, read 1,178,796 times
Reputation: 1620
Quote:
Originally Posted by nomadicheart7 View Post
No worries here about missing out on hoagies. Actually... I hate hoagies! Too onion-y...LOL!

I've been to DC a few times, once in the late spring/early summer, and it was pretty warm and humid but not too bad. I can deal with a fair amount of humidity and heat since things in Philly can get rough in the summer! The temp can get so high, 90+, and humidity is bad at times, lasting all the way into September. So honestly, I've dealt with it before, to an extent. I'm not overly worried. And at least in a quirky, cool city like Louisville, the weather is just a small drawback.

Serious question: why is it the city with the most allergies in the U.S.? I have very, very mild allergies - nothing severe enough for me to take Zyrtec, though. Have you ever heard of someone moving here and their allergies getting worse? Just curious. I don't want that to happen obviously.

I'll research the Highlands. Several users have pointed me toward looking into this area to live. Glad to know my budget is affordable. Is pet-friendly housing a lot more expensive here, if you know that by any chance?
Allergy question - it really depends on what you're allergic to. Louisville does tend to have a bit more issues with allergies, but some people don't experience any issues at all. I have mild allergies and never really had a big problem in Louisville. It was in Bloomington (about 90 mins north of Louisville) where I suffered.

Pollen counts are really high in the area, and much of that comes from wet winters. I think with the El Nino forecast this year it might be a bit milder of a winter this year, so perhaps it won't be as bad next spring.

Pet friendly - depends on the pet type. I think cats are easier to find a place that will accept them, but you likely have to put down a $200-300 deposit and pet rent of $25-40/mo extra on top. I'm looking for places in town myself and this is what I've run into with apartment searches so far. Dogs are tougher to find acceptance for in apartments as they have breed restrictions with every place I've seen that even allows pets at all, but I think the fees are similar to cats.

Last edited by ServoMiff; 10-21-2015 at 10:36 AM..
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Old 10-21-2015, 02:29 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia
49 posts, read 50,326 times
Reputation: 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by ServoMiff View Post
Allergy question - it really depends on what you're allergic to. Louisville does tend to have a bit more issues with allergies, but some people don't experience any issues at all. I have mild allergies and never really had a big problem in Louisville. It was in Bloomington (about 90 mins north of Louisville) where I suffered.

Pollen counts are really high in the area, and much of that comes from wet winters. I think with the El Nino forecast this year it might be a bit milder of a winter this year, so perhaps it won't be as bad next spring.

Pet friendly - depends on the pet type. I think cats are easier to find a place that will accept them, but you likely have to put down a $200-300 deposit and pet rent of $25-40/mo extra on top. I'm looking for places in town myself and this is what I've run into with apartment searches so far. Dogs are tougher to find acceptance for in apartments as they have breed restrictions with every place I've seen that even allows pets at all, but I think the fees are similar to cats.
Thanks for all the great info. I really get the feeling I wouldn't be a major allergy sufferer there, since the pollen counts can get pretty high in my area at times and I rarely feel it other than mildly itchy eyes. I'm sure that having a cat, it'll be a lot easier for me, and I wouldn't mind a cheap increase of 50 extra dollars per month or a deposit.
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Old 10-21-2015, 02:43 PM
 
236 posts, read 274,878 times
Reputation: 246
Quote:
Originally Posted by nomadicheart7 View Post
No worries here about missing out on hoagies. Actually... I hate hoagies! Too onion-y...LOL!

I've been to DC a few times, once in the late spring/early summer, and it was pretty warm and humid but not too bad. I can deal with a fair amount of humidity and heat since things in Philly can get rough in the summer! The temp can get so high, 90+, and humidity is bad at times, lasting all the way into September. So honestly, I've dealt with it before, to an extent. I'm not overly worried. And at least in a quirky, cool city like Louisville, the weather is just a small drawback.

Serious question: why is it the city with the most allergies in the U.S.? I have very, very mild allergies - nothing severe enough for me to take Zyrtec, though. Have you ever heard of someone moving here and their allergies getting worse? Just curious. I don't want that to happen obviously.

I'll research the Highlands. Several users have pointed me toward looking into this area to live. Glad to know my budget is affordable. Is pet-friendly housing a lot more expensive here, if you know that by any chance?
I've found the weather of Philly and Louisville to be almost identical. It does tend to snow more frequently in Louisville, but the snowfalls are not nearly as heavy. Louisville's hills tend to cut out the wind, which makes the heat a little less bearable. It's a bit more humid in Louisville, but not much worse. Like I said, weather is more or less the same.

Your allergies will almost certainly increase in Louisville. Moving to Philly and actually being able to breathe through both nostrils has been a huge plus for me.

There is a slight culture change. People in Louisville tend to be very friendly, but a big stand offish once the friendly exterior is broken. In Philly it's the opposite. But no one is going to disparage you because of being from out East. The culture is more conservative in Louisville, but not universally so.

I'd recommend looking up the St. James Art Show and the First Friday Trolley hop. Louisville punches above it's weight as an art city IMO.

If you're looking to go car free however, I can't recommend it. While it is certainly possible to do so in Louisville, it is not at all convenient. You will be cut off from a large section of the community and there are very few, if any, high performing bus lines that come with any regularity outside of rush hour except for perhaps the downtown circulators. Biking could very well be an option if you're willing to brave rain and snow however.

I don't think you'll find Louisville to be as bustling as what you're used to, but there are certainly things to do most all the time. You may not have as many choices on what event to attend or what type of things to do, but if you work at it you don't need to just sit at home. It's a nice city that certainly has some charm.
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Old 10-21-2015, 03:03 PM
 
Location: New Albany, Indiana (Greater Louisville)
11,112 posts, read 23,019,425 times
Reputation: 11069
Louisville has several universities. U of Louisville is a largish public, similar to Temple. Bellarmine is a private college with a few thousand students, it's in The Highlands. Spalding is a small private college south of downtown

I'm not sure why allergies are worse here but they are. I have no problems but many people do.

And yes, if you want to be car free the Highlands is by far the best place to be. But you'll still want a friend who owns a car
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Old 10-21-2015, 03:48 PM
 
7,000 posts, read 15,140,035 times
Reputation: 3432
Quote:
Originally Posted by nomadicheart7 View Post
Thanks so much Peter. If I need help, I will message you. I'm glad my budget is affordable and there's a lot to do. Are there any art/cultural events you'd recommend going to throughout the year? How are the universities and colleges in the city?
There's tons. some every month. Here are some for October

Event Results : GoToLouisville.com Official Travel Source

Travel and Leisure ranked Louisville a top 5 city for most festivals...only other midsized cities on the list were Nashville, Austin, and New Orleans. There are tons, Not just St James, but Ideafest, Forecastle Festival, Louder than Life fest, and every thing from the largest US Zombiefest to the largest festival celebrating shotgun homes. If you look, there is an event almost everyweek, especially outside the cold months of dec-feb, where it is not as busy.

Nulu gallery trolley hops are the first Friday of each month. You should attend everyone bc it really draws the awesome creative class out, and the food, drinks, and art are nice. On Frankfort Avenue, the last Friday of each month hosts a similar gallery hop.

I also agree with the poster above. Louisville isn't as vibrant as Philly. But for its size, its PRETTY darn vibrant, and in certain neighborhoods like the Highlands, you will feel like you are in a southern philly paying less than half the price to live there. The key to Louisville? Know what is going on. Know where the festivals are that week. Know what the hotspots are and what days. It is not a city that "jumps and screams at you" and there is stuff to do on every block. Sometimes you need to know where or what to do.

Utilize the local websites for that. do502.com is good
gotolouisville.com has a good event list
louisvillehotbytes.com for foodie info
https://www.facebook.com/BackseatSandbarcom-6546818945/ formusic

even national publications have good info like thrillist. Notice only the hippest mid sized cities are on thrillist

Transit..meh. It is not as bad as people say but then again, there is no city anywhere near Louisville's size and pricepoints that has elite transit. If you live downtown, Old Louisville, or near Bardstown or Frankfort inside the 264 beltway, you can use it pretty well to go to and from downtown and vice versa. Otherwise it is serviceable. Nothing like transit you are used to in the NE. And although the urban core is very walkable and bike friendly (Louisville is now a Silver bike city), obviously there is no train system. However, even mid sized cities with small transit systems like Portland, Cleveland, or even Buffalo don't really have any better transit than Louisville.
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