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Old 09-10-2017, 06:05 PM
 
Location: Pleasant Hill, CA
25 posts, read 22,805 times
Reputation: 18

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Hi,

I'm looking at the option of moving from Silicon Valley to the Louisville area.

I've lived near Oakwood, OH for 6 months, which I consider to be a pretty ideal little city. It's also very similar in appearance to the city I grew up in Piedmont, CA. It has the standard picturesque, tree-lined streets, smaller yards & close proximity to grocery stores, etc.

Are there any neighborhoods that exist in the Louisville area similar to Oakwood, OH? Even the occasional Tudor architecture would be nice...:0)

BTW - I've also lived in Lexington, KY for two years.

Thanks for your help!
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Old 09-10-2017, 07:44 PM
 
Location: I is where I is
2,097 posts, read 1,906,521 times
Reputation: 2332
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zwaeback View Post
Hi,

I'm looking at the option of moving from Silicon Valley to the Louisville area.

I've lived near Oakwood, OH for 6 months, which I consider to be a pretty ideal little city. It's also very similar in appearance to the city I grew up in Piedmont, CA. It has the standard picturesque, tree-lined streets, smaller yards & close proximity to grocery stores, etc.

Are there any neighborhoods that exist in the Louisville area similar to Oakwood, OH? Even the occasional Tudor architecture would be nice...:0)

BTW - I've also lived in Lexington, KY for two years.

Thanks for your help!
Not that it has anything to do with your move to Louisville, but I too currently live in Pleasant Hill, CA and moved here from Louisville about 2 years ago! I have to say, I like Louisville 100x better than the Bay Area!

The Highlands is a great neighborhood to look into. It's very urban, plenty of shops, restaurants, etc...in very close proximity, and it's a very safe area. Plenty of parks nearby as well, most homes have smaller yards for sure!

You could also look into the Crescent Hill area of Louisville. Small yards, trees, etc...with some good food options & groceries nearby.

Old Louisville has a very unique feeling all in it's own. It's one of the largest Victorian home/era neighborhoods in the US, and is very close to downtown Louisville. Again, trees, parks, etc...all nearby.
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Old 09-10-2017, 08:20 PM
 
Location: Pleasant Hill, CA
25 posts, read 22,805 times
Reputation: 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg10556 View Post
Not that it has anything to do with your move to Louisville, but I too currently live in Pleasant Hill, CA and moved here from Louisville about 2 years ago! I have to say, I like Louisville 100x better than the Bay Area!

The Highlands is a great neighborhood to look into. It's very urban, plenty of shops, restaurants, etc...in very close proximity, and it's a very safe area. Plenty of parks nearby as well, most homes have smaller yards for sure!

You could also look into the Crescent Hill area of Louisville. Small yards, trees, etc...with some good food options & groceries nearby.

Old Louisville has a very unique feeling all in it's own. It's one of the largest Victorian home/era neighborhoods in the US, and is very close to downtown Louisville. Again, trees, parks, etc...all nearby.
Hi Greg!

Haha! People seem to move to the Bay Area for work & move away to pursue life.

I actually just moved down to Millbrae, south of San Francisco. Pleasant Hill had been my home for most of the last seven years. I was doing a 4 hr round-trip commute to Burlingame, which is too much for me.

I'll look into The Highlands area. It sounds good. Unfortunately, I didn't check out Louisville much when I lived in Lexington, but it sounds nice.

I was also looking at the St Matthews area earlier today, mainly since it's near a Trader Joe's.

Thanks for the info about Old Louisville. Nice!

BTW - I moved back to the Bay Area for work reasons. Now the work can be done remotely, so no need to stay in the Bay Area. I'm going through the same routine that mainly others seem to be going through...:0) Where I'm currently living houses...errr shacks cost a minimum $1.5 million.
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Old 09-10-2017, 11:20 PM
 
6,989 posts, read 15,121,428 times
Reputation: 3422
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zwaeback View Post
Hi Greg!

Haha! People seem to move to the Bay Area for work & move away to pursue life.

I actually just moved down to Millbrae, south of San Francisco. Pleasant Hill had been my home for most of the last seven years. I was doing a 4 hr round-trip commute to Burlingame, which is too much for me.

I'll look into The Highlands area. It sounds good. Unfortunately, I didn't check out Louisville much when I lived in Lexington, but it sounds nice.

I was also looking at the St Matthews area earlier today, mainly since it's near a Trader Joe's.

Thanks for the info about Old Louisville. Nice!

BTW - I moved back to the Bay Area for work reasons. Now the work can be done remotely, so no need to stay in the Bay Area. I'm going through the same routine that mainly others seem to be going through...:0) Where I'm currently living houses...errr shacks cost a minimum $1.5 million.
Old Louisville is seeing tons of CA transplants. It is still racially and economically diverse.


You may also consider Louisville's IN suburbs. Still urban, but literally so cheap. New Albany IN and Jeffersonville downtowns

Further into Louisville's burbs, Anchorage, Norton Commons, Middletown, Jeffersontown, Shelbyville, La Grange, all have that quaint downtown with retail.

But New Albany is so close to the urban core, has an urban appearance itself...not sure why you'd not want to see it
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Old 09-11-2017, 12:44 AM
 
Location: Pleasant Hill, CA
25 posts, read 22,805 times
Reputation: 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter1948 View Post
Old Louisville is seeing tons of CA transplants. It is still racially and economically diverse.


You may also consider Louisville's IN suburbs. Still urban, but literally so cheap. New Albany IN and Jeffersonville downtowns

Further into Louisville's burbs, Anchorage, Norton Commons, Middletown, Jeffersontown, Shelbyville, La Grange, all have that quaint downtown with retail.

But New Albany is so close to the urban core, has an urban appearance itself...not sure why you'd not want to see it
Thanks Peter!

Yeah, I wasn't sure about Louisville's Indiana suburbs...

New Albany looks inexpensive with very low crime rates. The restaurant selection also looks pretty interesting & diverse. Although, The schools have generally very low ratings. I don't currently have kids, but low school ratings usually say something about an area. Maybe low property taxes equals lower quality schools...dunno.

Also, thanks for all of the smaller town/area suggestions. They're definitely worth checking out.
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Old 09-11-2017, 07:19 AM
 
Location: I is where I is
2,097 posts, read 1,906,521 times
Reputation: 2332
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zwaeback View Post
Hi Greg!

Haha! People seem to move to the Bay Area for work & move away to pursue life.

I actually just moved down to Millbrae, south of San Francisco. Pleasant Hill had been my home for most of the last seven years. I was doing a 4 hr round-trip commute to Burlingame, which is too much for me.

I'll look into The Highlands area. It sounds good. Unfortunately, I didn't check out Louisville much when I lived in Lexington, but it sounds nice.

I was also looking at the St Matthews area earlier today, mainly since it's near a Trader Joe's.

Thanks for the info about Old Louisville. Nice!

BTW - I moved back to the Bay Area for work reasons. Now the work can be done remotely, so no need to stay in the Bay Area. I'm going through the same routine that mainly others seem to be going through...:0) Where I'm currently living houses...errr shacks cost a minimum $1.5 million.
I too moved here for work!

St.Mathews is a great area, as is anywhere in the East End.

As Peter recommended, New Albany is very much on the rise. That's actually where I lived before moving and I loved it. It has a few small pockets to avoid, but if you stay downtown you'll love it. A lot of restaurants, local shops,etc... I lived in downtown right near a pizza place called Wicks Pizza and it was simply perfect for me.

If schools are important, Floyds Knobs, IN has amazing schools. It's only about 20 minutes from downtown Louisville, and 10 minutes from New Albany. It doesn't really have a "downtown" but it's a super nice, safe suburb area.
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Old 09-11-2017, 09:51 AM
 
Location: New Albany, Indiana (Greater Louisville)
11,093 posts, read 22,998,648 times
Reputation: 11050
Oakwood looks to be an older suburb in the nice part of Dayton, an area that is not dense urban but has some nice pre 1950 architecture. Most similar to Oakwood would be inner east neighborhoods and adjacent suburbs - Outer parts of the Highlands (Bardstown Rd and Taylorsville Rd from Douglass Loop to I-264), Crescent Hill, St Matthews, and Clifton. After that Audubon Park area. All those areas are similar to Ashland Park area of Lexington.
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Old 09-11-2017, 08:27 PM
 
6,989 posts, read 15,121,428 times
Reputation: 3422
Quote:
Originally Posted by censusdata View Post
Oakwood looks to be an older suburb in the nice part of Dayton, an area that is not dense urban but has some nice pre 1950 architecture. Most similar to Oakwood would be inner east neighborhoods and adjacent suburbs - Outer parts of the Highlands (Bardstown Rd and Taylorsville Rd from Douglass Loop to I-264), Crescent Hill, St Matthews, and Clifton. After that Audubon Park area. All those areas are similar to Ashland Park area of Lexington.
Basically, the area which hugs I-264 on either side, north of I-64 would be his best bet. Graymoor-Devondale and Lyndon would be options too. As would Kingsley, Strathmoor Village (my votes)
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Old 09-11-2017, 11:25 PM
 
Location: Pleasant Hill, CA
25 posts, read 22,805 times
Reputation: 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg10556 View Post
I too moved here for work!

St.Mathews is a great area, as is anywhere in the East End.

As Peter recommended, New Albany is very much on the rise. That's actually where I lived before moving and I loved it. It has a few small pockets to avoid, but if you stay downtown you'll love it. A lot of restaurants, local shops,etc... I lived in downtown right near a pizza place called Wicks Pizza and it was simply perfect for me.

If schools are important, Floyds Knobs, IN has amazing schools. It's only about 20 minutes from downtown Louisville, and 10 minutes from New Albany. It doesn't really have a "downtown" but it's a super nice, safe suburb area.
Hey, thanks Greg!

The Wick's Pizza area looks good.

Floyds Knobs looks like it's in the giant palatial estates category. I would need to produce a ton of family to fill one of those houses...haha...:0) Though the schools are definitely higher rated than the surrounding area.

Thanks for the east side / St Mathews area recommendation.
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Old 09-11-2017, 11:42 PM
 
Location: Pleasant Hill, CA
25 posts, read 22,805 times
Reputation: 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by censusdata View Post
Oakwood looks to be an older suburb in the nice part of Dayton, an area that is not dense urban but has some nice pre 1950 architecture. Most similar to Oakwood would be inner east neighborhoods and adjacent suburbs - Outer parts of the Highlands (Bardstown Rd and Taylorsville Rd from Douglass Loop to I-264), Crescent Hill, St Matthews, and Clifton. After that Audubon Park area. All those areas are similar to Ashland Park area of Lexington.
Wow, thanks for the reply "censusdata"!

I'm checking out your specific area recommendations.

Thanks for the Ashland Park area comparison. I lived a few blocks south of there for a year.
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