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Old 01-12-2018, 01:54 PM
 
Location: TN/NC
35,081 posts, read 31,322,562 times
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The hold-up, to me, are the bridges. If I have to cross those bridges all the time, that's going to be expensive with tolls (unless they have some kind of EZPass type option), not to mention that's where a lot of the big traffic jams occur.

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Dissenter View Post
I'd be worried about potentially a spike in COL. Namely because that is a massive selling point of Louisville of having a lot of big city amenities at an affordable price.
Louisville also has a great urban core when many cities have let theirs deteriorate, or sprawl. That's part of the appeal, not just price.
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Old 01-12-2018, 03:05 PM
 
Location: I is where I is
2,096 posts, read 2,327,733 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
The hold-up, to me, are the bridges. If I have to cross those bridges all the time, that's going to be expensive with tolls (unless they have some kind of EZPass type option), not to mention that's where a lot of the big traffic jams occur.



Louisville also has a great urban core when many cities have let theirs deteriorate, or sprawl. That's part of the appeal, not just price.
There is an option like EZpass, it’s called RiverLink. Just drive through and it charges automatically like anywhere else
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Old 01-12-2018, 09:05 PM
 
Location: Taipei
7,778 posts, read 10,168,764 times
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Does Louisville have a comprehensive strategic mass transportation plan?
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Old 01-12-2018, 10:56 PM
 
7,070 posts, read 16,749,925 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by projectmaximus View Post
Does Louisville have a comprehensive strategic mass transportation plan?
of course

https://louisvilleky.gov/government/...ove-louisville

The fact is while I’d love to see rail, few cities this size have built it successfully. One thing we do need are a couple fixed line trolleys (we has 100 lines a century ago) ala New Orleans to promote our growing tourist economy.

We are currently constructing BRT to the SW suburbs on Dixie Hwy.
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Old 01-13-2018, 08:20 AM
 
382 posts, read 489,244 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Dissenter View Post
I'd be worried about potentially a spike in COL. Namely because that is a massive selling point of Louisville of having a lot of big city amenities at an affordable price.
As someone from Nashville, I can attest to the higher COL as a result of growth. Incomes are higher, which helps, but sometimes I dream of paying less than 1000 for a decent one bedroom apartment near an urban center.
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Old 01-13-2018, 06:47 PM
 
Location: Indiana
25 posts, read 51,586 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
The hold-up, to me, are the bridges. If I have to cross those bridges all the time, that's going to be expensive with tolls (unless they have some kind of EZPass type option), not to mention that's where a lot of the big traffic jams occur.



Louisville also has a great urban core when many cities have let theirs deteriorate, or sprawl. That's part of the appeal, not just price.
A lot of the traffic jams in Louisville area is along the 71 near the Oldham/Jefferson County line and in between Mellwood and St. Matthews area, and the 65 at times in downtown. The Bridges have helped with traffic congestion as far as getting to Indiana or into Kentucky. The Sherman Minton on the 64 still allows free access, which is a plus for Floyd County, Indiana and New Albany.

Clark County has seen a lot of commercial growth on the far northeast of 10th street near the 265, not to mention the building in the old Ammunitions property a few miles up the road. Southern Indiana is still an easy place to live and work in Louisville, if one desires.
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Old 01-14-2018, 05:54 PM
 
Location: IL/IN/FL/CA/KY/FL/KY/WA
1,265 posts, read 1,424,098 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter1948 View Post
Servo....Louisville HAS put 3 billion into roads via bridges alone. They are about to pump a half a billion by digging a sewer tunnel below the river.

I think your main frustration is from how 71 and 265 need 3 lanes in each direction...that's KY's fault. Also, I am afraid the 71 cloverleaf interchange is forever stuck as it is now pretty much landlocked with development all around. I still think Louisville traffic is a joke, and its MARKEDLY better now that the bridges are complete, not sure if its a coincidence or what. Nashville or Austin traffic is a disaster! Litrerally an hour to get anywere, no exaggeration.

The answer for 71 and 64 are building new interchanges as a new "county line road." Pretty much every city around us has this and in Indy and Columbus, these are the areas where all the devlopment has occured. KY is morons for not putting an exit for like 8 miles on I-71 between 265 and Crestwood. Between I-64/265 interchange, it is something like 11 miles to simpsonville exit! That is a ridiculous space between exits and an exit "futher out" would help spread the traffic out for folks traveling to the increasingly popular sprawlburbs.

71 needs an exit with a side road to connect to KY 22 near Orchard Grass hills (while there is still maybe a small swath of land for right of way). On I-64, there needs to be an exist somewhere east of Eastwood with another road somewhere east of the Parklands to connect this interchange to US 60. Literally if Louisville was in any other state, this would have been completed already. This is all the fault of rural KY legislators.
That 3 million investment was needed 20 years ago. Plans to build the East end bridge were happening in the late 1980's when I was in middle school. Also, that cost now somewhat prohibits future spend because despite the income they're getting from the tolls being better than expected, it's not going to put a quick enough dent to make any more major improvements without federal dollars - and who knows what's going to happen there.
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Old 01-15-2018, 09:07 AM
 
Location: TN/NC
35,081 posts, read 31,322,562 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by somewhereoutthere15 View Post
As someone from Nashville, I can attest to the higher COL as a result of growth. Incomes are higher, which helps, but sometimes I dream of paying less than 1000 for a decent one bedroom apartment near an urban center.
To be fair, this is kind of the case all over the country - rapidly rising rents and property prices in urban cores are forcing people out into cheaper areas.

At least in Louisville, you do have some options for under $1,000 in the core of the action. If price is a concern, you can find much cheaper options across the river in Indiana. $1,000/month ain't happening in urban Nashville. If you want "cheap cheap," you're going far out to the edges of commuting practicality. Louisville doesn't have that problem. You can find "cheap cheap" still relatively close to the urban core.

https://www.trulia.com/rental-commun...0202/#photo-15

For building, Louisville and the Midwest in general are much cheaper than pretty much anywhere else in the country. This house would probably be double in suburban Nashville. It would likely be a $300,000 house in my small town.

https://www.trulia.com/builder-commu...lan/3270630510

I live in a college town. The best 1BRs at the nicest complexes in the area start at about $800/month. The very best complex starts at about $900/month. Yes, KY has much higher taxes than TN, but jobs here are (by and large) much lower paying, and there is a very shallow professional job market. An entry level IT analyst position pays about $35,000 here - that may pay $50,000 in Louisville, and you're also going to have a much greater selection of jobs, and if you lose your job, you can probably stay in town, unlike small towns where you're likely to move.

The biggest advantage, to me, of a reasonable metro like Louisville is that you get big city amenities at a similar cost to many small or mid-sized towns in other locations. As the hot metros on the coasts and the "it" cities on the interior further price regular people, I see cities like Louisville, Cincinnati, and Indianapolis catching another wave of "economic migrants."
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Old 01-15-2018, 04:31 PM
 
7,070 posts, read 16,749,925 times
Reputation: 3559
Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
To be fair, this is kind of the case all over the country - rapidly rising rents and property prices in urban cores are forcing people out into cheaper areas.

At least in Louisville, you do have some options for under $1,000 in the core of the action. If price is a concern, you can find much cheaper options across the river in Indiana. $1,000/month ain't happening in urban Nashville. If you want "cheap cheap," you're going far out to the edges of commuting practicality. Louisville doesn't have that problem. You can find "cheap cheap" still relatively close to the urban core.

https://www.trulia.com/rental-commun...0202/#photo-15

For building, Louisville and the Midwest in general are much cheaper than pretty much anywhere else in the country. This house would probably be double in suburban Nashville. It would likely be a $300,000 house in my small town.

https://www.trulia.com/builder-commu...lan/3270630510

I live in a college town. The best 1BRs at the nicest complexes in the area start at about $800/month. The very best complex starts at about $900/month. Yes, KY has much higher taxes than TN, but jobs here are (by and large) much lower paying, and there is a very shallow professional job market. An entry level IT analyst position pays about $35,000 here - that may pay $50,000 in Louisville, and you're also going to have a much greater selection of jobs, and if you lose your job, you can probably stay in town, unlike small towns where you're likely to move.

The biggest advantage, to me, of a reasonable metro like Louisville is that you get big city amenities at a similar cost to many small or mid-sized towns in other locations. As the hot metros on the coasts and the "it" cities on the interior further price regular people, I see cities like Louisville, Cincinnati, and Indianapolis catching another wave of "economic migrants."
S

Simply xxcellent analysis.....the quadrangle that stretches from Columbus to Indy, Louisville to Lexington and Cincy/Dayton is as big as Chicago population wise, has many amenities, has many cities easily accessible to each other, and is doing very well economically (Dayton being the exception).
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Old 01-15-2018, 05:18 PM
 
Location: Huntersville/Charlotte, NC and Washington, DC
26,700 posts, read 41,753,896 times
Reputation: 41381
Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
To be fair, this is kind of the case all over the country - rapidly rising rents and property prices in urban cores are forcing people out into cheaper areas.

At least in Louisville, you do have some options for under $1,000 in the core of the action. If price is a concern, you can find much cheaper options across the river in Indiana. $1,000/month ain't happening in urban Nashville. If you want "cheap cheap," you're going far out to the edges of commuting practicality. Louisville doesn't have that problem. You can find "cheap cheap" still relatively close to the urban core.

https://www.trulia.com/rental-commun...0202/#photo-15

For building, Louisville and the Midwest in general are much cheaper than pretty much anywhere else in the country. This house would probably be double in suburban Nashville. It would likely be a $300,000 house in my small town.

https://www.trulia.com/builder-commu...lan/3270630510

I live in a college town. The best 1BRs at the nicest complexes in the area start at about $800/month. The very best complex starts at about $900/month. Yes, KY has much higher taxes than TN, but jobs here are (by and large) much lower paying, and there is a very shallow professional job market. An entry level IT analyst position pays about $35,000 here - that may pay $50,000 in Louisville, and you're also going to have a much greater selection of jobs, and if you lose your job, you can probably stay in town, unlike small towns where you're likely to move.

The biggest advantage, to me, of a reasonable metro like Louisville is that you get big city amenities at a similar cost to many small or mid-sized towns in other locations. As the hot metros on the coasts and the "it" cities on the interior further price regular people, I see cities like Louisville, Cincinnati, and Indianapolis catching another wave of "economic migrants."
This is a great analysis and I will very likely be one of them economic migrants.
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