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Old 05-31-2007, 10:23 AM
 
32 posts, read 133,335 times
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My husband just called me and it looks we'll be relocating back to Louisville. We lived there from '91 to 2000 but moved to the Boston area to be closer to his family (I'm originally from CA). He's got a great job opportunity with potential for growth back with his old company, so off we go again! I'm really excited because I loved living there and am happy to get back to an area with a reasonable cost of living.

I've heard the public schools in Oldham County are good, but I'm really feeling like I don't want to be that far out. I lived in J-town before, so we're targeting that area, St. Matthews (where we went to church) and the Highlands (because it's so darn cool). We'll look in Oldham County also to see what's there. I'd love to live near Seneca and Cherokee parks, and to be near a good school for the kids (elementary). I'm thinking we may put them in a parochial school. Does anyone have any info on schools in those areas (rankings, reputation, fee structure, etc.) ?

One thing we'll have to weigh is that it seems you get more house for your money the farther out you go from the city (like in many areas, the Boston area included! ) . I've been looking at houses online, and it seems like the bigger, newer houses are further out. I'd like to stay within the Gene Snyder freeway if possible. I would consider an older, smaller house, if the location was right and if it had been renovated. Our budget is fairly flexible, but we're looking to stay within the 400's - 500's if possible.

I welcome any and all comments! Thanks.
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Old 05-31-2007, 10:40 AM
 
79 posts, read 400,219 times
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Default Us too...hopefully

Quote:
Originally Posted by cinnamon girl View Post
My husband just called me and it looks we'll be relocating back to Louisville. We lived there from '91 to 2000 but moved to the Boston area to be closer to his family (I'm originally from CA). He's got a great job opportunity with potential for growth back with his old company, so off we go again! I'm really excited because I loved living there and am happy to get back to an area with a reasonable cost of living.

I've heard the public schools in Oldham County are good, but I'm really feeling like I don't want to be that far out. I lived in J-town before, so we're targeting that area, St. Matthews (where we went to church) and the Highlands (because it's so darn cool). We'll look in Oldham County also to see what's there. I'd love to live near Seneca and Cherokee parks, and to be near a good school for the kids (elementary). I'm thinking we may put them in a parochial school. Does anyone have any info on schools in those areas (rankings, reputation, fee structure, etc.) ?

One thing we'll have to weigh is that it seems you get more house for your money the farther out you go from the city (like in many areas, the Boston area included! ) . I've been looking at houses online, and it seems like the bigger, newer houses are further out. I'd like to stay within the Gene Snyder freeway if possible. I would consider an older, smaller house, if the location was right and if it had been renovated. Our budget is fairly flexible, but we're looking to stay within the 400's - 500's if possible.

I welcome any and all comments! Thanks.
We are also moving back...a friend of mine just told me that Seneca, Highlands and Cherokee area are in high demand. We loved Cherokee park homes...the older homes some overlooking the park on Cherokee Rd. They were expensive a few years ago (we lived there 2003-2005) so I can't imagine what they are now. Holy Family is a good parochial school and there is also St Raphael. If you're a parishioner of the church and contribute a certain amount, every church has different requirements, you get a tuition break. There is also Holy Spirit in St Matthews.

This we site is for the Louisville Archdiocese which has info on schools. Archdiocese of Louisville: Schools

Good Luck!
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Old 05-31-2007, 11:03 AM
 
32 posts, read 133,335 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mama4mia View Post
We are also moving back...a friend of mine just told me that Seneca, Highlands and Cherokee area are in high demand. We loved Cherokee park homes...the older homes some overlooking the park on Cherokee Rd. They were expensive a few years ago (we lived there 2003-2005) so I can't imagine what they are now. Holy Family is a good parochial school and there is also St Raphael. If you're a parishioner of the church and contribute a certain amount, every church has different requirements, you get a tuition break. There is also Holy Spirit in St Matthews.

This we site is for the Louisville Archdiocese which has info on schools. Archdiocese of Louisville: Schools

Good Luck!
Thank you. You too! Yeah, I know if we move to those areas, it will be a trade off in terms of the kind of house we might be able to afford it we lived further out, but it might be worth it to be able to walk so many places and enjoy all the area has to offer.

Thanks for that link. I'll check it out. One nice thing about Louisville is that there are so many Catholic parishes and schools to choose from. Thanks again.
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Old 05-31-2007, 11:31 AM
 
14 posts, read 35,713 times
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Wink Best place in Kentucky

Breckinridge County is the best place to live in Kentucky if you don't mind living an hour from Louisville. Low taxes, less crime, very low priced acreage!
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Old 05-31-2007, 11:37 AM
 
7,021 posts, read 15,204,860 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cinnamon girl View Post
Thank you. You too! Yeah, I know if we move to those areas, it will be a trade off in terms of the kind of house we might be able to afford it we lived further out, but it might be worth it to be able to walk so many places and enjoy all the area has to offer.

Thanks for that link. I'll check it out. One nice thing about Louisville is that there are so many Catholic parishes and schools to choose from. Thanks again.
Two of the top parocial schools by far, and among the best schools in Kentucky and the Midwest, are St. Raphael and St. Agnes. Both are located in the Highlands. St Agnes would be my top choice right now, and the school has won several NATIONAL blue ribbon awards for excellence. These are the types of schools where children receieve a college prep education starting at an early age, and are surrounded by students who have parents with ambition.

Be aware that a savvy home shopper will be able to find new construction in the Highlands and older neighborhoods. As far as resale, buying/building in an established neighborhood with superb location is the thing many people just do not get about real estate. Although much of the urban infill (new construction in the city) is condo developments and mid and high rises, there are several developments in the actual city offering new, traditional looking single family homes. If you are interested in the Highlands, the top streets for your price range are Village Dr. and Broadmeade and Carolina Ave in Seneca Gardens. Literally every block you get closer to the parks, home prices increase DRASTICALLY.

In the far east suburbs, St. Patrick is newer and highly touted. In St Regis Park you have St. Albert which ranks high. Of course metro Louisville and its suburbs still have around 40 Catholic k-8 schools (although many smaller ones have recently merged), and 10 Catholic high schools, so there are alot to choose from! In terms of high schools, the top ranking ones are Dupont Manual (my alma mater and a public magnet), Kentucky Country Day, Collegiate, Walden, and St. Xavier and Trinity for boys (Catholic). These schools have by far the highest college scholarship earners, the highest AP offerings, and test scores. Therefore, these ones stand out and are as good or better than the top schools in any major metro.

In a tier right behind them appears Ballard, Eastern, Male, Sacred Heart (all girls Catholic), and Assumption (all girls Catholic) are neck and neck. After this, the "third" tier of good ones are located suburban/exurban side: South Oldham and Oldham County and Floyd Central in Indiana.

There are lots of other high schools above the median. Among them are Providence (coed Catholic in Clarksville), Jeffersonville, Mercy (all girls Catholic), Desales (all boys Catholic), Jeffersontown, and other schools with a particular career magnet that may interest your child.

The worst high schools by far, which are well below the national mean and quite poor performing in some instances are 1) Shawnee 2) Iroqouis 3) Western 4) Southern 5) Central 6) Fairdale
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Old 05-31-2007, 12:35 PM
 
32 posts, read 133,335 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stx12499 View Post
Two of the top parocial schools by far, and among the best schools in Kentucky and the Midwest, are St. Raphael and St. Agnes. Both are located in the Highlands. St Agnes would be my top choice right now, and the school has won several NATIONAL blue ribbon awards for excellence. These are the types of schools where children receieve a college prep education starting at an early age, and are surrounded by students who have parents with ambition.

Be aware that a savvy home shopper will be able to find new construction in the Highlands and older neighborhoods. As far as resale, buying/building in an established neighborhood with superb location is the thing many people just do not get about real estate. Although much of the urban infill (new construction in the city) is condo developments and mid and high rises, there are several developments in the actual city offering new, traditional looking single family homes. If you are interested in the Highlands, the top streets for your price range are Village Dr. and Broadmeade and Carolina Ave in Seneca Gardens. Literally every block you get closer to the parks, home prices increase DRASTICALLY.

In the far east suburbs, St. Patrick is newer and highly touted. In St Regis Park you have St. Albert which ranks high. Of course metro Louisville and its suburbs still have around 40 Catholic k-8 schools (although many smaller ones have recently merged), and 10 Catholic high schools, so there are alot to choose from! In terms of high schools, the top ranking ones are Dupont Manual (my alma mater and a public magnet), Kentucky Country Day, Collegiate, Walden, and St. Xavier and Trinity for boys (Catholic). These schools have by far the highest college scholarship earners, the highest AP offerings, and test scores. Therefore, these ones stand out and are as good or better than the top schools in any major metro.

In a tier right behind them appears Ballard, Eastern, Male, Sacred Heart (all girls Catholic), and Assumption (all girls Catholic) are neck and neck. After this, the "third" tier of good ones are located suburban/exurban side: South Oldham and Oldham County and Floyd Central in Indiana.

There are lots of other high schools above the median. Among them are Providence (coed Catholic in Clarksville), Jeffersonville, Mercy (all girls Catholic), Desales (all boys Catholic), Jeffersontown, and other schools with a particular career magnet that may interest your child.

The worst high schools by far, which are well below the national mean and quite poor performing in some instances are 1) Shawnee 2) Iroqouis 3) Western 4) Southern 5) Central 6) Fairdale
Wow, styx! Thank you! This is just the kind of "insider" info I was looking for. As we house hunt, I want to have a target school in mind (vs. finding a house and then a school nearby if you know what I mean). I'll check out the schools you mentioned. I'm particularly interested in those two schools in the Highlands. They sound fantastic. Also, thanks for those street names -- helps to narrow things down. I would love to be in walking distance to the parks, but it might have to be a very looooong walk! Ha! That's okay, I could stand to lose a few!
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Old 05-31-2007, 12:38 PM
 
32 posts, read 133,335 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LauraBrueggman2 View Post
Breckinridge County is the best place to live in Kentucky if you don't mind living an hour from Louisville. Low taxes, less crime, very low priced acreage!
Thanks, Laura. We're definitely looking to be closer in. Right now we live just under an hour west of Boston because the prices are lower, but I feel too isolated. We'll have to bit the bullet to be closer, but we're willing to do that on this next move. I read your other post, btw. Good luck with your move!
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Old 05-31-2007, 01:02 PM
 
7,021 posts, read 15,204,860 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cinnamon girl View Post
Wow, styx! Thank you! This is just the kind of "insider" info I was looking for. As we house hunt, I want to have a target school in mind (vs. finding a house and then a school nearby if you know what I mean). I'll check out the schools you mentioned. I'm particularly interested in those two schools in the Highlands. They sound fantastic. Also, thanks for those street names -- helps to narrow things down. I would love to be in walking distance to the parks, but it might have to be a very looooong walk! Ha! That's okay, I could stand to lose a few!
There are more street names I can give. I would target the immediate area around Village Drive first. That is well known prime real estate and if you can get a home for 500k that needs a little upgrading, do it, because that is a steal! You will see very solid and fast appreciation. To give you an idea, two blocks to the west, on Casselberry, a home just sold for close to 1.5 million for 4,000 sf.

Seneca Gardens is always hot (Meadow and Broadmeade are the top streets), and almost within walking distance to St Raphael. Generally, the side of the street where St Raphael is located is more affordable. The other streets I mentioned are on the park side of Bardstown, thus more expensive (but its all about location remember?).

About a half mile further southwest, two streets offer homes built in the last 25 years and are very highly regarded, and many have homes in the 350-400k range. This includes Sylvan Way and Kensington Place. Many of the homes in Kensington Place are very new, and I also noticed a new subdivision being constructed on a former estate off Newburg Road between Schuff Lane and Sylvan Way. You may want to inquire with a realtor about that as I imagine that will be hot property.

Additionally, the area around Boulevard Napolean and Douglass Ave is nice. The highest regarded street in this area is probably Saratoga Dr. or Valley Vista Dr. All have great rehabbed homes with solid families in every house, plenty of playmates for the kids, and a very forward, friendly, and progressive types of inhabitants.

Of course, I have given you recommendatios for areas that are nearly uniformly white families. If you wish to have a slight bit more diversity or would like a home with much more ornate detail like a 1890's Romanesque, or Richardsonian Revival, I would look at Cherokee Triangle. Everett, Willow, Cherokee and Glenmary roads are the tops in this area. Everett is a real gem and has made a real come back with hip young families and most homes priced between 250k-750k. These are the types of people who run as couples down to Cherokee Park while pushing junior in one of those bike strollers. These same couples will walk with the kids out to Bardstown/Baxter for some ice cream or maybe even a gyro. I always love seeing that in an area. There are a few rentals scattered in the area and several condo rehabs, but it is a true urban neighborhood, and the rentals are 90% young single professionals, or a few eldery who like apartments.
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Old 05-31-2007, 01:12 PM
 
Location: New York City
2,814 posts, read 6,442,806 times
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Stx, are you sure that you're not a realtor? If not, you should be one.
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Old 05-31-2007, 01:18 PM
 
32 posts, read 133,335 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stx12499 View Post
There are more street names I can give. I would target the immediate area around Village Drive first. That is well known prime real estate and if you can get a home for 500k that needs a little upgrading, do it, because that is a steal! You will see very solid and fast appreciation. To give you an idea, two blocks to the west, on Casselberry, a home just sold for close to 1.5 million for 4,000 sf.

Seneca Gardens is always hot (Meadow and Broadmeade are the top streets), and almost within walking distance to St Raphael. Generally, the side of the street where St Raphael is located is more affordable. The other streets I mentioned are on the park side of Bardstown, thus more expensive (but its all about location remember?).

About a half mile further southwest, two streets offer homes built in the last 25 years and are very highly regarded, and many have homes in the 350-400k range. This includes Sylvan Way and Kensington Place. Many of the homes in Kensington Place are very new, and I also noticed a new subdivision being constructed on a former estate off Newburg Road between Schuff Lane and Sylvan Way. You may want to inquire with a realtor about that as I imagine that will be hot property.

Additionally, the area around Boulevard Napolean and Douglass Ave is nice. The highest regarded street in this area is probably Saratoga Dr. or Valley Vista Dr. All have great rehabbed homes with solid families in every house, plenty of playmates for the kids, and a very forward, friendly, and progressive types of inhabitants.

Of course, I have given you recommendatios for areas that are nearly uniformly white families. If you wish to have a slight bit more diversity or would like a home with much more ornate detail like a 1890's Romanesque, or Richardsonian Revival, I would look at Cherokee Triangle. Everett, Willow, Cherokee and Glenmary roads are the tops in this area. Everett is a real gem and has made a real come back with hip young families and most homes priced between 250k-750k. These are the types of people who run as couples down to Cherokee Park while pushing junior in one of those bike strollers. These same couples will walk with the kids out to Bardstown/Baxter for some ice cream or maybe even a gyro. I always love seeing that in an area. There are a few rentals scattered in the area and several condo rehabs, but it is a true urban neighborhood, and the rentals are 90% young single professionals, or a few eldery who like apartments.
Okay, I'm totally printing out this thread and taking it with us on our first house hunting trip! Awesome info, styx. I like the way you can "paint a picture" of an area. BTW, I just called St. Agnus, St. Raphael, St. Patrick and St. Albert to request information/apps. I'll be loaded for bear when we come. I'm trying to do as much advance research and leg work as I can because I probably won't have a ton of time when I visit. I want to do as targeted a search as I can rather than running around willy nilly. Thanks again for all your help! I'm really getting excited about his move!
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