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Old 07-28-2011, 01:26 PM
 
Location: Lake Highlands - Dallas
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I graduated in 2008 and only wish I could go back. I had a great time out there!
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Old 07-28-2011, 02:25 PM
 
Location: Greenville, Delaware
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Quote:
Originally Posted by catman View Post
It would be the height of folly to reject going to Texas Tech because one doesn't like the word "Tech". It is a fine university.
If you can neutralise your Tech BA with graduate degrees from somewhere else...
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Old 07-28-2011, 09:26 PM
 
Location: Metromess
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doctorjef: I don't understand that.
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Old 07-29-2011, 06:36 AM
 
Location: Greenville, Delaware
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OK, in fairness, Tech may be fine for certain science-related degrees and actually some of its science graduate degree programs seem to be quite favourably looked upon. I wouldn't, however, want to get a degree in the liberal arts or the fine arts from Tech. These degrees simply aren't going to be very highly thought of by most people, at least outside West Texas. Education degrees are probably a safe bet because most people don't really care where those come from: they're primarily credentials for teaching or administration at the elementary or secondary levels. The Law School at Tech is nationally known for hiring a lot of right wing cranks such as Alberto Gonzalez. It's academic rigor may be fine, but a law degree from Tech is unlikely to serve one well for employment with more highly competitive,nationally known law firms or for an academic law career. Even the veterinary medicine program at Tech is regarded as strictly second rate in comparison to the world-class program at Texas A&M. A friend of mine who started her veterinary degree at Tech and then transferred to A&M confided to me that at A&M she felt that she was "actually getting an education" in her degree program (not to mention that when we lived in London we had the experience of sophisticated lab studies on one of our cats being sent all the way to A&M for analysis).

Tech is strictly a second or possibly third tier state institution. UT and A&M are obviously in first place. The University of North Texas (the former NTSU) is in the second rank, as is University of Houston. Tech seems to fit in a little higher than Texas State University, Lamar, Stephen F Austin, and the like.

The quality of teaching in many programs at Tech is quite adequate. Some of my mentors in my internship days had done their PhDs in clinical psychology at Tech and were quite competent. However, there is a problem in terms of how the university is generally regarded outside of some particular science fields. I'm quite happy to have an undergraduate degree from the University of Texas. I really wouldn't have felt proud to have that degree reflecting the Texas Tech "brand". I'm actually happier with the University of Texas "brand" on my BA than I am with the brand on my two graduate degrees.
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Old 07-29-2011, 08:00 AM
 
437 posts, read 924,601 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by doctorjef View Post
OK, in fairness, Tech may be fine for certain science-related degrees and actually some of its science graduate degree programs seem to be quite favourably looked upon. I wouldn't, however, want to get a degree in the liberal arts or the fine arts from Tech. These degrees simply aren't going to be very highly thought of by most people, at least outside West Texas. Education degrees are probably a safe bet because most people don't really care where those come from: they're primarily credentials for teaching or administration at the elementary or secondary levels. The Law School at Tech is nationally known for hiring a lot of right wing cranks such as Alberto Gonzalez. It's academic rigor may be fine, but a law degree from Tech is unlikely to serve one well for employment with more highly competitive,nationally known law firms or for an academic law career. Even the veterinary medicine program at Tech is regarded as strictly second rate in comparison to the world-class program at Texas A&M. A friend of mine who started her veterinary degree at Tech and then transferred to A&M confided to me that at A&M she felt that she was "actually getting an education" in her degree program (not to mention that when we lived in London we had the experience of sophisticated lab studies on one of our cats being sent all the way to A&M for analysis).

Tech is strictly a second or possibly third tier state institution. UT and A&M are obviously in first place. The University of North Texas (the former NTSU) is in the second rank, as is University of Houston. Tech seems to fit in a little higher than Texas State University, Lamar, Stephen F Austin, and the like.

The quality of teaching in many programs at Tech is quite adequate. Some of my mentors in my internship days had done their PhDs in clinical psychology at Tech and were quite competent. However, there is a problem in terms of how the university is generally regarded outside of some particular science fields. I'm quite happy to have an undergraduate degree from the University of Texas. I really wouldn't have felt proud to have that degree reflecting the Texas Tech "brand". I'm actually happier with the University of Texas "brand" on my BA than I am with the brand on my two graduate degrees.

First of all, Alberto Gonzales taught an undergraduate course, and was never associated with the Law School. The Law School is very good at preparing one to pass the bar exam and practice law. As the matter of fact, it often dominates much more expensive and "pretigious" school in bar exam passage rates. However, it is a very young school and doesn't carry the name recognition of some of the older establishments. So, you're right about the employment prospects at large firms nationally, but it's a fine option if you plan to practice in Texas.
Second, there is no veterinarian school at Texas Tech and there never has been. It's no wonder your friend felt she was not being educated to become a veterinarian.
Third, Texas Tech is well on its way to being named Texas' next "Tier One" University. Several schools are vying for the designation right now, but everything I'm reading indicates that Tech is a front-runner.
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Old 07-29-2011, 09:42 AM
 
Location: Greenville, Delaware
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I'm not sure about your contention that Tech never had a veterinary school. In the early 1970s I understood that it had one of the two veterinary programs in the state, the other of course being A&M. Perhaps that was wrong and it had some sort of pre-veterinary major or something, in which case I was wrong. I can't understand how I could have been living in Lubbock and been completely misinformed about the matter.

Yes, I know all about the high bar exam scores generated by Tech Law School graduates, but the fact is: Tech law degrees will never carry much prestige, and even in Texas law degrees from the UT Law School clearly are the in-state prestige product. I will say that the Tech law school doesn't have the sort of crap reputation as, say, St Mary's University Law School in San Antonio (generally considered the worst established law school in the state, though I can't imagine the one at Texas Wesleyan - originally a proprietary law school back in the 1980s that Texas Wesleyan took over - can be any better regarded than St Mary's).

Outside of some of the sciences, a Tech degree is only good if no one cares where your degree came from or if you're going to spend your life in West Texas. I say this as someone whose father taught for a number of years in the Dept of Mgmt and Marketing at Tech, but I still wouldn't want a business degree from Tech if I wanted a status degree; contrast to a business degree from UT. Moreover, because I was able to test out of quite a number of general undergrad requirements at Tech, I ended up taking a substantial number of courses in my major and minor fields at Tech before I transferred to UT. The level of instruction for most of those was, I think, quite decent; however, it still wouldn't cause me to wish to have a degree that said "Texas Tech University" on it. A&M may be the subject of jokes, but everyone knows it has top-notch programs. Tech isn't even taken seriously enough to be the subject of jokes.

OK, looked at the Tech website. Whatever the case in the past, the current situation seems to be that there is a pre-veterinary medicine option within animal science: http://www.depts.ttu.edu/officialpub.../AG_ANFDSC.php This may have been what my friend, who subsequently got her veterinary degree from A&M, was studying at Tech.

Last edited by doctorjef; 07-29-2011 at 09:59 AM..
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Old 07-29-2011, 10:55 AM
 
Location: Denver
4,716 posts, read 8,572,305 times
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doctorjef: I realize you're going off of experience that is almost 40 years old by now, but things actually have changed. I hardly could be considered a booster. In fact, I never even considered Tech as an option for school, but it really is becoming one of the more respected institutions in the state. Both Tech and UH are the front runners (with Tech a little ahead at the moment) for becoming the next Tier One university in the state. To suggest that it's somehow below UH and UNT means that either you're misinformed, going off of old information, or a little bit bitter. (I can't imagine you'd bash Texas State, UH, or UNT in such a fashion.)

I don't see Tech carrying much weight outside this region, but you're being way too harsh.
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Old 07-29-2011, 11:42 AM
 
2,325 posts, read 3,932,372 times
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Doctorjef,

I have said this before, but I strongly believe that your viewpoints are colored by what may have been the case back in the 1970's, which of course occurred prior to when most of today's students at Texas Tech were born.

For starters, Tech has raised over $750 million since 2005, and in 2010 was 46th in donations among the nation's universities, surpassing Rice, Michigan State, and others, according to the Council for Aid to Education. It has raked in over $100 million in each of the last five years.

Plus, the university is set to open a new College of Business Administration building in January, and there are plans for a Petroleum Engineering structure in the near future. Numerous others have been constructed in the last decade.

That has to account for something, right?
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Old 07-29-2011, 02:17 PM
 
437 posts, read 924,601 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rr2005 View Post
Yes, I know all about the high bar exam scores generated by Tech Law School graduates, but the fact is: Tech law degrees will never carry much prestige, and even in Texas law degrees from the UT Law School clearly are the in-state prestige product. I will say that the Tech law school doesn't have the sort of crap reputation as, say, St Mary's University Law School in San Antonio (generally considered the worst established law school in the state, though I can't imagine the one at Texas Wesleyan - originally a proprietary law school back in the 1980s that Texas Wesleyan took over - can be any better regarded than St Mary's).
I generally agree with this statement. But, you are going to pay for the "prestige" degree dearly, as tuition at UT is much higher than at Tech. Tech is the least expensive law school in the state and consistently posts the highest bar pass rates. It's also been named one of the "Top 20 Value" law schools in the nation. After all, the most prestigious law degree in the world is worthless without the law license to go with it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by rr2005 View Post
OK, looked at the Tech website. Whatever the case in the past, the current situation seems to be that there is a pre-veterinary medicine option within animal science: Department of Animal and Food Sciences This may have been what my friend, who subsequently got her veterinary degree from A&M, was studying at Tech.
That would make sense. To be clear though, there is not even a "pre-vet" major at Tech, just an Animal Science degree with an emphasis in that direction. A & M has the only veterinary school in Texas.[/quote]
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Old 07-29-2011, 05:07 PM
 
Location: Greenville, Delaware
4,726 posts, read 11,974,466 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Westerner92 View Post
doctorjef: I realize you're going off of experience that is almost 40 years old by now, but things actually have changed. I hardly could be considered a booster. In fact, I never even considered Tech as an option for school, but it really is becoming one of the more respected institutions in the state. Both Tech and UH are the front runners (with Tech a little ahead at the moment) for becoming the next Tier One university in the state. To suggest that it's somehow below UH and UNT means that either you're misinformed, going off of old information, or a little bit bitter. (I can't imagine you'd bash Texas State, UH, or UNT in such a fashion.)

I don't see Tech carrying much weight outside this region, but you're being way too harsh.
Well, to be clear, I don't think much of Texas State University - the former oddly named Southwest Texas State University - at all. In Austin where I lived for so many years, the university in San Marcos is known as a big party school. I knew loads of young people - twenty-somethings - who were getting their degrees there (or failing to do so). They were Austin natives and Austin's slacker contingent -- academically unambitious middle class kids who went to Southwest Texas State because it was the course of least resistance if you were from circumstances that dictated the expectation of going to college. Obviously that's a biased sample, but Texas State University impressed me as a rather local/regional school that wasn't very academically demanding. In comparison, I'd definitely see Tech as a better school. Southwest Texas State went from a geographically inapt name that also sounded patently regional to a name that sounds erroneously like it's a major state institution, simply disingenuous.

Otherwise, you're correct: I wouldn't bash University of Houston or UNT in the same way. UofH has a hideous campus (not worse looking than UTA or Lamar, however), but academically it has a decent reputation. UNT is quite a good school and renamed themselves something sensible when they got rid of the former North Texas State University appelation.
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