U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Texas > Lubbock
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 08-04-2012, 08:16 PM
 
2,200 posts, read 3,622,683 times
Reputation: 1124

Advertisements

Lubbock leaders unveil 'Imagine Lubbock Together' - KCBD NewsChannel 11 Lubbock

Imagine Lubbock Together by MindMixer
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-07-2012, 07:17 PM
Status: "Vacation right now." (set 14 hours ago)
 
Location: Suburban Dallas
51,381 posts, read 44,752,995 times
Reputation: 31659
Well, at least, there is a group that's taking some initiative. That's where it always begins. Believe me, I've had thoughts on my mind for years on how to make Lubbock a better place. I'm just hoping that there will be folks with a dream and some great ideas. Maybe they'll come up with something that I haven't mentioned. Let's just hope the "cold water committee" stays away. If they just fold their hands and turn the other cheek, then they'll get nothing. If you don't see it before you see it, you'll never see it.

So stay tuned. Maybe some lemons will be turned into lemonade.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-08-2012, 01:45 PM
 
15,429 posts, read 19,984,423 times
Reputation: 28598
Quote:
Originally Posted by case44 View Post
So stay tuned. Maybe some lemons will be turned into lemonade.
Let's just hope Lubbock planners realize it takes water to make lemonade. Sufficient water to support growth is, of course, a limiting factor all over the Texas High Plains. I don't see the rest of Texas, and certainly not the rest of the U.S., assisting in the resolution of that issue either.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-08-2012, 07:07 PM
 
Location: Texas
746 posts, read 1,366,482 times
Reputation: 1062
I think that some of these folks making up slogans are stuck int he 70's. Do slogans really do anything for a city? Maybe so, maybe not. I just dunno.

I just can't help but remember "Simply Lubbock", "Lubbock...Love it or Leave It", and various other slogans plastered on bumper stickers and billboards all over town.

There are some true visionaries in Lubbock, however. Love 'em or hate 'em, the McDougals have a clear vision, and are certainly counted in Lubbock's visionary population. Sure they stand to make coin from their vision, but you gotta admit what they have done with the North Overton project has turned out well, so maybe prospective coin is a better incentive than yet another slogan.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-08-2012, 07:38 PM
 
15,429 posts, read 19,984,423 times
Reputation: 28598
One of the things I have learned from my past 40 odd years around the South Plains is that growth out here can be painful. I recall Clovis' efforts to save Cannon from the last BRAC. There were "Keep Cannon" stickers and billboards all over town and one couldn't find anyone who didn't support the Base. Then I think of how airmen were treated in Clovis by many of the locals and businesses when I was out there in the late 1960s. On the other hand, luckily they treated us badly and I retreated to Muleshoe and met my wife.

God bless Lubbock, or any place, that wants healthy long-term growth. I wish them all the luck but they need to realize that water on the High Plains is a very precious commodity and the High Plains continues to be one of the nation's richest farming areas in the nation. There are some folks over there in Lubbock who don't even know how significant cotton is to their economy. How much they know or care about the local water resources has to also be in doubt.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-09-2012, 06:30 PM
 
Location: Northern Wisconsin
10,368 posts, read 10,023,240 times
Reputation: 18658
IMHO, they should just do the best they have with what they got. This is never going to be a major metro area, and I doubt it will grow a whole lot more. As High Plains said, Water is a huge issue. Considering how little rain we've had the last couple of years, it looks like it may stay this way for a good long while. The farming acreage seems to decrease every year as the water table dies up. The only real reason the town is here is because of Tech. The fortune of the city is almost completely tied to the future of Tech, growth or shrinkage. Its likely to stabalize as the birth rate drops, and college is becoming less and less a priority.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-13-2012, 08:12 PM
Status: "Vacation right now." (set 14 hours ago)
 
Location: Suburban Dallas
51,381 posts, read 44,752,995 times
Reputation: 31659
Quote:
Originally Posted by High_Plains_Retired View Post
Let's just hope Lubbock planners realize it takes water to make lemonade. Sufficient water to support growth is, of course, a limiting factor all over the Texas High Plains. I don't see the rest of Texas, and certainly not the rest of the U.S., assisting in the resolution of that issue either.
You do know I was speaking figuratively a while ago, HPR? I thought that city's water problems were at least partially resolved, but that wasn't what I referred to in my "lemonade" comment. Conservation in Lubbock will obviously need to be practiced, and the people must be educated on it.


Meanwhile, folks, they continue to add on to the Lubbock Business Park.

Lubbock Economic Development Alliance
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-13-2012, 08:37 PM
 
15,429 posts, read 19,984,423 times
Reputation: 28598
Quote:
Originally Posted by case44 View Post
You do know I was speaking figuratively a while ago, HPR?
Yes, I knew that. I was just being a wise guy and playing on your words. Sorry 'bout that.

Quote:
Originally Posted by case44;25623676I thought that city's water problems were at least partially resolved, but that wasn't what I referred to in my "lemonade" comment. Conservation in Lubbock will obviously need to be practiced, and the people must be educated on it.

Meanwhile, folks, they continue to add on to the Lubbock Business Park.

[URL="http://www.lubbockeda.org/recruitment_business_park.php"
Lubbock Economic Development Alliance[/url]
No the City's water problems are not quite resolved yet. I guess the drought doesn't help but Lubbock will probably have to find much more water than the Lake Allen Henry reservoir or that from the rapidly diminishing ground water supplies to handle long term growth at the same rate as they are now experiencing. I'm not sure where they will get it. Austin doesn't seem to listen to west Texas too often. Not enough voters out here I guess.

I'm all for Lubbock growth. Maybe after I'm gone, my children can sell my old worthless land and houses out here and get something for them.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-14-2012, 07:06 AM
 
Location: Northern Wisconsin
10,368 posts, read 10,023,240 times
Reputation: 18658
There is no permanent solution to the water problem unless someone wants to pay to pipe it all the way from Oklahoma or something similar. Lake Allen Henry will not last very long now that they've started to use it. The new water rights purchased in the northern panhandle will likely last for quite a few years, but after that, there simply is no water. The aquafer under us is slowly being pumped dry. Most of the farmers I know cannot even come close to pumping at full capacity. The water board reported recently that the average farmers well in this area lost 2 1/2 feet of water in just the last year with the drought. If you drive over to eastern NM, you can get a vision of what this area will eventually become; just huge open grassland and scrub with nothing for miles. That's what it was when the first white people saw the land. When the water is all gone, I have no idea where they will get the water then, and my guess is that no one else has a clue either. If you are a young person, my advice is to find someplace else to settle.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-14-2012, 10:27 AM
 
15,429 posts, read 19,984,423 times
Reputation: 28598
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prairieparson View Post
If you drive over to eastern NM, you can get a vision of what this area will eventually become; just huge open grassland and scrub with nothing for miles.
Of course Eastern New Mexico would look just like the Texas Panhandle if the Federal government didn't own most of it. With the increasing price of land in New Mexico, and the tremendous Federal deficits, the Feds may eventually sell out. Then the High Plains will be in serious trouble as the demand for High Plains water would greatly increase.

There will always be water for the sparsely distributed rural people on the High Plains. We will just continue to dig deeper wells because we have only one or two wells to support our meager use. Large scale irrigated farming will go the way of the dodo as they are unable to draw enough water to irrigate. Dryland farming may replace much of the irrigated and royalties from wind turbines will replace the income from irrigated crops.

Cities like Lubbock and Amarillo will continue to act as large sponges on the aquifer but they have the political clout to get their water problems resolved to some extent. Water will become expensive in Texas as state and municipal water policies change to reduce its use.

I forgot to mention that Nostradamus was my 13th great grandpa.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Settings
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2020 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Texas > Lubbock

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2022, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top