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Old 10-25-2010, 12:11 AM
 
Location: Denton, TX
47 posts, read 81,054 times
Reputation: 18

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Hey guys!

My girlfriend and I are exploring some of New England trying to find a home for once we finish up school. We are anxious to escape Texas and all the culture of Dallas and start a family and build a home. We're attracted to the New England culture; the pace of life, the personality of Yankees, the natural beauty. Everything.

We're looking for a really simple life. We're both wrapping up our degrees and plan on teaching high school so we feel as if we could really move any where we could find jobs. We know jobs are hard to come by up there (we've been told by people in the Vermont threads and the New Hampshire threads to look else where) but we're really preparing early and we're not leaving Texas till we find jobs up there.

The only problem is, we don't even know where to begin looking in Maine!
We would really appreciate any tips of what towns to begin looking in.

A little about us and what we're looking for:
Above and beyond we want a small, rural town with a very tight-nit community. Some where we could buy one house, lay down roots, raise a family, and truly call our home.
We're not particularly worried about living on the coast, we really want a cold, cold winter and beautiful autumns. We'd like to be close to some skiing and winter sports but its not our upmost concern. I'd really like to be able to close to hunting and I am dying to be able to start fly fishing (but any good fishing will do). We really want to be able to escape and get out hiking and camping and kayaking as much as possible. Basically we just want simple.

So far we've looked at Bethel and really like what we've seen. We're not really interested Portland. I know absolutely nothing about the northern part of Maine but for some reason we're very interested in the country up there.

Sorry I don't have much to tell you all but absolutely any recommendations of towns that seem to fit (or that you just love) would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks in advance!
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Old 10-25-2010, 03:17 AM
 
Location: Maine's garden spot
3,386 posts, read 6,498,243 times
Reputation: 3805
Quote:
Originally Posted by tskav View Post
Hey guys!

My girlfriend and I are exploring some of New England trying to find a home for once we finish up school. We are anxious to escape Texas and all the culture of Dallas and start a family and build a home. We're attracted to the New England culture; the pace of life, the personality of Yankees, the natural beauty. Everything.

We're looking for a really simple life. We're both wrapping up our degrees and plan on teaching high school so we feel as if we could really move any where we could find jobs. We know jobs are hard to come by up there (we've been told by people in the Vermont threads and the New Hampshire threads to look else where) but we're really preparing early and we're not leaving Texas till we find jobs up there.

The only problem is, we don't even know where to begin looking in Maine!
We would really appreciate any tips of what towns to begin looking in.

A little about us and what we're looking for:
Above and beyond we want a small, rural town with a very tight-nit community. Some where we could buy one house, lay down roots, raise a family, and truly call our home.
We're not particularly worried about living on the coast, we really want a cold, cold winter and beautiful autumns. We'd like to be close to some skiing and winter sports but its not our upmost concern. I'd really like to be able to close to hunting and I am dying to be able to start fly fishing (but any good fishing will do). We really want to be able to escape and get out hiking and camping and kayaking as much as possible. Basically we just want simple.

So far we've looked at Bethel and really like what we've seen. We're not really interested Portland. I know absolutely nothing about the northern part of Maine but for some reason we're very interested in the country up there.

Sorry I don't have much to tell you all but absolutely any recommendations of towns that seem to fit (or that you just love) would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks in advance!
Find a job first. the scenery is nice, but work is very hard to come by.
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Old 10-25-2010, 04:57 AM
 
19,480 posts, read 26,880,904 times
Reputation: 37965
ServingSchools.com


Teacher Jobs in Maine | Indeed.com


Here are a couple teaching employment links


Maine is rich with communities that you described- when you come up for a visit-drive around, see what towns you like
Bethel is an awesome, scenic area-but most of Maine is!
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Old 10-25-2010, 07:53 AM
 
Location: 40 miles north of Bangor, Maine
264 posts, read 710,298 times
Reputation: 385
From another young couple who recently moved to Maine...

I am certified to teach in schools here... I check out serving schools website almost daily. I live about 1 hour north of bangor. Welcome to Lincoln, Maine!
I absolutely love it here, but here is something to consider that will be the situation in a lot of towns... I have a highschool 20 min to my north, and one 20 min to my south... after those 2 schools, I'd be driving about 45 min minimum to the next one or an hour to a city with multiple ones. A lot of towns only have elementary schools, and then once the kids hit the older grades, they travel a good distance to the closest highschool, and then highschools start getting further distances. So IF you choose a town first and did not get a job at the closest highschool, you are going to be driving a GOOD distance. So my suggestion would be to either 1) Look for jobs first from out of state and hope you get a job being out of state and then move to that area (it can be hard to get hired without being in Maine) OR 2) move here and RENT (having enough money to get by for a while) in a general area you have come to love... apply for jobs as living here and even apply further away then the town you choose if you see openings, then once you GET a job, then move and settle permanently in someplace close to the area you found a job.

Also if you don't find a job immediately, don't forget about Ed Tech 3 positions (i see alot around the state), you'd get paid less but if living cheaper in a small apartment for a while first, you'd be fine till you get settled since its just the 2 of you. Also many places need subs just as you get settled. Get all your certifications done even before moving here (Ed tech certs and finger printing and the apps done for subbing) that way you have a back up being in the field before you have a job.

Good Luck, its a beautiful state but the jobs are scarce.
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Old 10-25-2010, 08:30 AM
 
325 posts, read 658,852 times
Reputation: 169
Vermont and New Hampshire both have much lower unemployment rates then Maine right now, but those stats could be deceiving.

I moved here from Vermont two years ago and have had a very tough time finding employment. But you might do better than I.

I don't blame you for wanting to leave Texas for New England; it truly is God's counry.

Last edited by Evan_Lanctot; 10-25-2010 at 09:17 AM..
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Old 10-25-2010, 09:02 AM
 
Location: Downeast
824 posts, read 854,977 times
Reputation: 879
I went to graduate school in Vermont and have occasion to visit Burlington from time to time. It always strikes me as frightening the gap between the cost of living and the salaries there. I can see the OP's motivation for leaving the DFW area in order to raise a family. It is a very crowded piece of real estate, and I imagine not a good place to raise a family with all that population would bring. I currently do not live in Maine,but will soon. I have an income, so location is not as much as an issue as it would be for a young family starting out. I do look at employment opportunities in Aroostook County and Washington County frequently as I am not opposed to working part time in order to remain active. It appears that the medical profession in that part of Maine is in dire need of applicants. Perhaps the OP could let folks on here know what their area of study is? They do state they are finishing up their degree and it was assumed they would be teaching, I am not sure this is the case. Anyway, I wish you well on your endeavors. I find fascinating this reverse migration from south to north, as opposed to the 80's and 90's north to south. I wonder if any sociological studies have been done on this? Oh too be young again and on an adventure.....I'll have to settle for old and on an adventure. Good luck!
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Old 10-25-2010, 09:50 AM
 
Location: Caribou, Me.
6,933 posts, read 5,077,235 times
Reputation: 5225
Quote:
Originally Posted by Evan_Lanctot View Post
Vermont and New Hampshire both have much lower unemployment rates then Maine right now, but those stats could be deceiving.

I moved here from Vermont two years ago and have had a very tough time finding employment. But you might do better than I.

I don't blame you for wanting to leave Texas for New England; it truly is God's counry.

Just to clarify a bit: Maine's unemployment is a bit higher than Vermont and New Hampshire, but it's not like Michigan or places like that (it is "officially" 7.7% but that might be a bit misleading).
I live in the County (the northern part of the state). It has a lot of what you're looking for and good teachers are usually being sought. It might involve driving a ways to get to your job but we just kind of accept that up here.
It is very different up here.....it's unlike 98% of the rest of the country.
My wife and I love it, but that's just us.
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Old 10-25-2010, 11:39 AM
 
Location: On a Slow-Sinking Granite Rock Up North
3,638 posts, read 5,747,451 times
Reputation: 2676
Quote:
Originally Posted by AustinB View Post
Find a job first. the scenery is nice, but work is very hard to come by.
Totally agree.

Welcome.

1. Visit first - BOTH summer and winter (end of January - end of February preferably).

2. Secure employment: Job portal link: Maine.gov: Employment: Job Opportunities

Also peruse this website for other bits of information. The job angle may dictate where you'd best look for a place to live unless you are able to work at home.

Good luck.
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Old 10-25-2010, 12:18 PM
 
1,061 posts, read 1,884,050 times
Reputation: 458
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kiwiluver View Post
I find fascinating this reverse migration from south to north, as opposed to the 80's and 90's north to south. I
In the 80s and 90s, it wasn't just people who went from north to south--employers did, too. They both also went west.

As for any south to north migration nowadays, it doesn't include employers. Without employers and jobs, not likely to be much of a migration.
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Old 10-25-2010, 12:41 PM
 
Location: Caribou, Me.
6,933 posts, read 5,077,235 times
Reputation: 5225
Quote:
Originally Posted by OutDoorNut View Post
In the 80s and 90s, it wasn't just people who went from north to south--employers did, too. They both also went west.

As for any south to north migration nowadays, it doesn't include employers. Without employers and jobs, not likely to be much of a migration.

I don't know. Did you realize that many of our biggest employers are Canadian companies? My neighbor works for one.
The biggest in-migration has been 600 excellent jobs coming to DFAS from all over the country. That includes another neighbor who came from Ohio and one from Florida.
Homeland Security has brought in many people recently.
A significant number of jobs can be done from home these days, also.
Our September unemployment rate was 7.8%, which is the state average.
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