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Old 07-10-2017, 11:59 AM
 
1,926 posts, read 1,023,318 times
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I lived for several years in Maine. I never felt like an outsider but some other people I knew at the time did (one from the midwest and one from California) In time I think they felt more accepted. I was in a very small town which likely amplified the effect.

Based on some of NEP321 posts on other forums I think he would feel a bit isolated in many parts of Maine. The Portland area is great but as said it's kind of an intersection between Boston and Maine. (Had a friend in Kennebunkport who used to say north of Portland was Southern Canada, while conversely a friend in Calais used to say Portland was just a northern suburb of Boston.)
I think some of the towns in the midcoast on up to the Bangor Ellsworth area may be worth investigating. Bangor is kind of a long drive to any other major area.

Also to the size of Maine
Maine has the 4th longest coastline of any state (lots of harbors bays islands etc)
Maine is the least densly populated state East of the Mississippi.
Depending on which report you go by Maine has either the most remote spot in the eastern half of the US or 2nd most ( I have seen one report claiming a spot in FL.) I think you can get almost 10 miles from a dirt road in Maine which puts you more then 20 from the nearest paved road.
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Old 07-10-2017, 03:57 PM
 
5,776 posts, read 14,412,027 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
If I go to Baxter, how long would it take to hike to the top of Mt. Kathadin? I only want to hike for maybe 1-2 hours max. If it's too long to hike up, are there any stunning spots around the base of the mountains that I can get some amazing photos?
Haven't posted in the Maine forum for a few years, but this thread caught my eye, because I have been to Baxter quite a few times. I haven't read through the thread, so apologies if anyone has already posted this information farther down in the thread than the part I've gotten to.

I have not hiked all around Baxter, but have usually taken the same basic route with a few variations. I'm pretty sure, though, that there is no parking area right at the base of Katahdin. That means you have some hiking to do just to reach the base of the mountain. I doubt that even a fast hiker could reach the summit of Katahdin within two hours from any parking area.

What I can tell you about the part of the park I'm familiar with starts by parking at the Roaring Brook campground. Then you hike up the Chimney Pond trail. Somewhere roughly midway along that trail, maybe an hour's hike or so (I think--it's been some time since I last hiked there), there is a stretch where the forest opens up right beside the trail, and there are some nice views across a lake.

My next suggestion depends on your hiking pace, and on how strictly you want to stay within that time limit of one to two hours. At a fairly fast clip you can hike from Roaring Brook to the Chimney Pond campground in a couple of hours or just over. It probably takes more like 2-1/2 hours or maybe slightly more if your pace is average. If your pace is very slow, this hike would take well beyond your stated time limit.

If you want to give that hike a try, though, the view from Chimney Pond campground is amazing. Katahdin is part of a long semicircular ridge that partially surrounds the CP campground. This puts the campground's location in a sort of natural amphitheater formed by Katahdin and neighboring Mt. Hamlin. The view across the clear water of Chimney Pond with the mountains close above and semi-surrounding you is awesome.

I wouldn't worry about the wildlife. I've made numerous multi-day trips to Baxter, and have walked around in the local woods in other parts of Maine, without ever encountering a bear.

If you should run across a bear, keep your distance and move cautiously through without trying to get up close for a good view of the animal. If a bear approaches too close, remember that he's probably more interested in any food you may have in your pack than in you. Never feed a bear deliberately, but be prepared to abandon your pack if necessary to keep the bear away from you. Based on my experience, though, you're unlikely even to see a bear.

The main thing to remember about moose is that they can be skittish, and sometimes can be aggressive, if you get too close. People may be tempted to get up close for a good view of a moose, and this might seem safe enough because a moose lumbering along looks kind of like nothing more than a big ol' funny-looking cow. However, because of their skittishness, it's smart to give moose a wide berth as you pass them or view them Do this and you should be safe enough around these animals.

Quote:
Originally Posted by massnative71 View Post
JI wouldn't worry much about the wildlife. Thousands visit the park every year with no issue. They will not bother you if you don't bother them, but if you are really worried then keep in mind that Maine is a "conceal carry" state. Either way, it will be you loss for not taking advantage of the natural wonder that it is.
When it comes to carrying a firearm for protection, while Massnative's observation about concealed carry is true in general, you need to take a closer look at various laws before tromping through the forests of Maine while toting a pistol. Of course if you don't own a gun this is a moot point. If you do, and want to consider packing some heat in Maine for protection against wildlife, there are a few points to consider.

First there's the matter of transporting a gun through MA, a very restrictive state on firearms, en route to Maine. I'm not sure what the laws are about those who aren't MA residents transporting firearms through MA on a trip between states, but that's something you would definitely want to check out to avoid legal trouble.

Even within Maine, the last I knew firearms were banned altogether in Baxter State Park. You'd want to double-check this next part if you were to consider carrying in other state parks, but I believe that it's lawful WITH RESTRICTIONS to carry a pistol in most or all state parks other than Baxter.

As for those restrictions, I may have this wrong, but, despite the fact that in general Maine allows open carry, and concealed carry without a permit, I believe that in state parks where firearms are allowed, the only way to lawfully carry a pistol is concealed, WITH a Maine CCW permit. I'm not sure what the law says about long guns, but I doubt that you'd want to lug one of those around while hiking anyway.

It's best to really know the gun laws if you're considering carrying, not just to assume that you can carry any firearm anywhere just because a state is in general a "concealed carry" state.

Last edited by ogre; 07-10-2017 at 04:09 PM..
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Old 07-10-2017, 05:18 PM
 
Location: New Jersey
1,720 posts, read 671,348 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
I noticed that Maine has the highest median age of any state in the entire nation, with a median age of about 43 years old. I am 33 and live in Connecticut. I have visited Maine and think is a beautiful place and have even dreamed of living there. But why is the population skewed older than any state in the nation? Is it because young people don't like it? Is it brain drain? Or what? I don't get it. Maine is the cheapest New England state to live in, and is affordable in general. Is the job market just difficult? What are the reasons why the state doesn't have many young people?

Are there young enclaves throughout the state? Maybe Portland or something?

Next week I am planning a 2-3 day trip to Maine. I will be driving up by myself (if weather permits). I have been to the Portland area already, five years ago and loved it, but that was just the tip of the state. I want to explore much more of the coast all the way up through that Down East area or whatever it's called. I want to see Acadia National Park and Baxter National Park. I won't do any hiking though because I'm scared of moose, caribou and bears. Then I want to go allllllll the way up to Caribou and all the way to the end of U.S. 1. The whole area looks stunning just by looking on Google Maps. I think I will fall in love with it, since I'm a nature lover.

But anyway, how come the state lags far behind with young people? It kind of concerns me. I am currently unemployed and looking for an accounting job here in the Hartford, CT area, but may expand my search to the entire state of CT or heck, even all of New England soon (including ME), depending on how things go in the coming weeks. I'm sure ME would be an extreme culture shock though for someone from CT.


I thought this would be helpful and answer some of your questions.

//www.city-data.com/forum/maine...e-squares.html
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Old 07-10-2017, 05:33 PM
 
16,813 posts, read 6,841,022 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LilyMae521 View Post
G1, great YouTube clip of knife edge hike. Thanks for posting.

You're welcome. I remember it like it was yesterday(it wasn't).I was scared to hell coming down it but the way I felt after was simply amazing!
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Old 07-10-2017, 06:32 PM
 
4,789 posts, read 6,582,281 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nep321 View Post
Well then I think those young people are stupid. I am 33 and I appreciate the beauty of Maine. I don't care about popular places, big cities, concerts, colleges, sports, etc. All I care about is peace, quiet, easy going lifestyle, nature, and having a few good friends. I don't care much for manmade activities like Disney World or all-inclusive hotel resorts.

People who like different things than you are stupid?
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Old 07-11-2017, 07:02 AM
 
1,439 posts, read 2,303,953 times
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I feel like Maine suffers from the same issues as my native western mass. There is one big employer in each sector. Which leads to job lock. Add to the fact that the housing prices in the scenic areas are driven up by retirees, it is hard to make it work.
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Old 07-11-2017, 07:33 AM
 
13,238 posts, read 10,104,656 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ogre View Post
Haven't posted in the Maine forum for a few years, but this thread caught my eye, because I have been to Baxter quite a few times. I haven't read through the thread, so apologies if anyone has already posted this information farther down in the thread than the part I've gotten to.

I have not hiked all around Baxter, but have usually taken the same basic route with a few variations. I'm pretty sure, though, that there is no parking area right at the base of Katahdin. That means you have some hiking to do just to reach the base of the mountain. I doubt that even a fast hiker could reach the summit of Katahdin within two hours from any parking area.

What I can tell you about the part of the park I'm familiar with starts by parking at the Roaring Brook campground. Then you hike up the Chimney Pond trail. Somewhere roughly midway along that trail, maybe an hour's hike or so (I think--it's been some time since I last hiked there), there is a stretch where the forest opens up right beside the trail, and there are some nice views across a lake.

My next suggestion depends on your hiking pace, and on how strictly you want to stay within that time limit of one to two hours. At a fairly fast clip you can hike from Roaring Brook to the Chimney Pond campground in a couple of hours or just over. It probably takes more like 2-1/2 hours or maybe slightly more if your pace is average. If your pace is very slow, this hike would take well beyond your stated time limit.

If you want to give that hike a try, though, the view from Chimney Pond campground is amazing. Katahdin is part of a long semicircular ridge that partially surrounds the CP campground. This puts the campground's location in a sort of natural amphitheater formed by Katahdin and neighboring Mt. Hamlin. The view across the clear water of Chimney Pond with the mountains close above and semi-surrounding you is awesome.

If you go up the Abol Slide, you hike a gentle grade through the woods for a short bit and from that point on it's pretty much straight up (to the tablelands). I might call that the base of the mountain, although I wouldn't make the descent down that route.


There does seem to be a consensus building regarding Chimney Pond. Probably the best bet for a shorter hike and good bang for the buck as far as views go.


Quote:
Originally Posted by ogre View Post
First there's the matter of transporting a gun through MA, a very restrictive state on firearms, en route to Maine. I'm not sure what the laws are about those who aren't MA residents transporting firearms through MA on a trip between states, but that's something you would definitely want to check out to avoid legal trouble.

I believe out of staters can transport an unloaded firearm locked in their trunk AS LONG AS they are permitted to carry it in the state where they reside, and they are authorized to have it in the state they are going TO.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ogre View Post
Even within Maine, the last I knew firearms were banned altogether in Baxter State Park. You'd want to double-check this next part if you were to consider carrying in other state parks, but I believe that it's lawful WITH RESTRICTIONS to carry a pistol in most or all state parks other than Baxter.
Good for pointing that out. I keep forgetting that Baxter acts as its own entity outside the regular state park system; with its own management, rules and regulations. I did look into it further, and you are correct in that firearms are prohibited in most of the park. There are some more remote portions of it where firearms are permitted for hunting, but anywhere near Katahdin you are out of luck.


Saying that, I have NEVER felt the need to be armed while visiting the park. I have encountered moose, deer and many other wildlife. I go along on my merry way, they do likewise.
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Old 07-11-2017, 07:42 AM
 
13,238 posts, read 10,104,656 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Boston_Burbs View Post
I feel like Maine suffers from the same issues as my native western mass. There is one big employer in each sector. Which leads to job lock. Add to the fact that the housing prices in the scenic areas are driven up by retirees, it is hard to make it work.
The big difference is the size. Areas more developed for tourism (especially down in the southern part) have had their housing prices go through the roof, but if you spread out more there are plenty of scenic more affordable areas where out of state money still goes a long way (or if you are lucky enough to score one of the few good paying jobs nearby). Sure prices have gone up compared to what they were a few years ago, but still nothing like Western MA, NH or VT. An example would be the Lincoln Lakes region.
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Old 07-11-2017, 07:47 AM
 
Location: Mid-Coast Maine...Finally!
302 posts, read 299,187 times
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I'll admit that I have not read all 5 pages of this post. I did read all of page 1 and page 5 to get the jist of the conversation, however, and would like to add this: Others have said it, Maine is a HUGE state. It is deceptively huge, as a matter of fact. From Connecticut, you're talking 10+ hours of non-stop driving to the Great North Woods, west of Baxter. You're talking 8+ hours to Lubec and the Bay of Fundy. (it's a full 100 miles North of Ellsworth. ) Acadia? Unless you're prepared to spend at least three days there, it's almost not worth it because you' won't be able to see very much or understand what you're experiencing. We've camped there a dozen times and still haven't see it all. Then there's Bar Harbor. As for taking Rt 1 all the way up, that's fine and fun, too, but if you want to stop in Rockland or Camden or any of the towns you're going to be slowed down. Heck, if you spend four full days on the road, just leaving CT, driving up Rt 1 to Lubec, then West to Baxter, then back down to Fryburg in Western Maine then back to Connecticut you're going to use up your road time quickly as it would be well over 1000 miles. Rather, select one area and investigate it separately and enjoy them one at a time. There's so much to see and experience. Each town has it's quirks that you'll only discover if you look. You won't see them if you are driving by at 55 mph. BTW, just to put it into perspective, Maine has a total of 3748 MILES of coastline. You read that right. Each one of those kooks and crannies have a story to share and views to enjoy.

I'd suggest that you grab the current issue of Yankee Magazine which is heavily laden with plenty of things to do i Maine this month. That'll help you decide what's important to you with the time you have available.

Rome
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Old 07-11-2017, 07:57 AM
 
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My wife and I, 32 and 34 respectively, moved from CT about 2 years ago. The property in the areas that are very rural are VERY inexpensive , especially when comparing to CT. We bought our house up here and looked for jobs up here or remotely working. WE NEVER regretted our decision to move. I wake up every day in a place that I would consider paradise. All the people we have met have been great and very friendly. If you are looking to move here DO IT. Look all over Maine as they all have different things that are great about them. I hope you make it up here, best move you will make.

Check out upper midcoast also, great prices and you are very close to everything, State Parks,Ocean, Down East and Belfast/Bangor.
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