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Old 12-02-2011, 09:07 AM
 
Location: Edgemere, Maryland
501 posts, read 1,013,481 times
Reputation: 175

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Because someone is overweight does not mean they are any more sickly than someone who is thin. You also have to take into account income, available food sources, and traditions with this. Most of your rural and Southern areas will have a battle with the bulge generally speaking due to traditional fried dishes and less access to "health foods" simply due to the types of stores in places like Montgomery County not being there and lack of income to afford it even if they were. I'm probably spouting common sense, but that's all this map is telling.
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Old 12-02-2011, 09:58 AM
 
3,684 posts, read 5,249,466 times
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On Tiger Beer's map, some of the extreme differences in the Western states clearly correspond to counties with Indian Reservations, the Dakota Badlands, etc. (which are highly obese). But I can't understand why the sudden divide right at western Kansas - eastern Colorado, since both sides of the state-line are identical, flat, wheat-farming areas. Does CO have better public health initiatives? And what's up with northwestern Maine? And why do parts of Oregon and Nevada contrast so sharply with neighboring counties in the same state? Why is western Oklahoma so much worse than N.W. and N.E. Texas, when they are both identical wheat and cattle ranching areas? (Is there more Indian presence on the OK side?) Why is there a sudden contrast along the Mississippi River, making southern Illinois and southern Iowa so much less obese than Missouri? And why does the N.W. Arkansas Ozark region show as healthier than the S.W. Missouri Ozark region? Again, is it a matter of state public health initiatives or something?

Last edited by slowlane3; 12-02-2011 at 10:14 AM..
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Old 12-02-2011, 10:11 AM
 
Location: Macao
15,996 posts, read 37,248,691 times
Reputation: 9617
Quote:
Originally Posted by slowlane3 View Post
On Tiger Beer's map, some of the extreme differences in the Western states clearly correspond to counties with Indian Reservations, the Dakota Badlands, etc. (which are highly obese). But I can't understand why the sudden divide right at western Kansas - eastern Colorado, since both sides of the state-line are identical, flat, wheat-farming areas. Does CO have better public health initiatives? And what's up with northwestern Maine? And why do parts of Oregon and Nevada contrast so sharply with neighboring counties in the same state? Why is western Oklahoma so much worse than northwest Texas, when they are both identical wheat and cattle ranching areas? Why is there a sudden contrast along the Mississippi River, making southern Illinois and southern Iowa so much less obese than Missouri? And why does the N.W. Arkansas Ozark region show as healthier than the S.W. Missouri Ozark region? Again, is it a matter of state public health initiatives or something?
Many of my own questions as well...those state lines are stark at times!

I'll bring over the map to this Page 2 so people can see it again easily...



Source: American Obesity Treatment Association - Obesity in America.
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Old 12-02-2011, 03:33 PM
 
Location: Cumberland
5,257 posts, read 8,454,389 times
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Guys, you can be in the "white region" and have an obesity rate of 26.2%. Raise that % to 27.8, just 1.6 percentage points, and you are in the blue. Very small difference in real life, very big difference just looking at the map. This map is cool, but not very informative due the range of % they use to demarcate the counties.
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Old 12-02-2011, 03:35 PM
 
Location: NYC
7,251 posts, read 11,539,503 times
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Originally Posted by westsideboy View Post
Guys, you can be in the "white region" and have an obesity rate of 26.2%. Raise that % to 27.8, just 1.6 percentage points, and you are in the blue. Very small difference in real life, very big difference just looking at the map. This map is cool, but not very informative due the range of % they use to demarcate the counties.
Quite true. Perhaps 5 gradients would have been better.
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Old 12-07-2011, 06:05 AM
 
Location: Santa Barbara, CA
1,154 posts, read 4,051,430 times
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The West seems to be nice and trim, even in the poorer states like Montana. Probably because of the abundance of outdoor activities. Wonder why Nevada is so fat though.
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Old 12-07-2011, 12:22 PM
 
30,315 posts, read 20,635,892 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post

Source:

Some Maryland Counties Have High Obesity Rates - Health News Story - WBAL Baltimore
(http://www.wbaltv.com/health/4167664/detail.html - broken link)

Over 25% obese people in St. Mary's, Somerset, Cecil and Kent counties, and Baltimore City.

Looks like Howard and MoCo are at 10-15%.
didn't you also start an obesity thread in the michigan forum?

what is this, obesity week?
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Old 12-07-2011, 05:06 PM
 
Location: Maine
2,036 posts, read 2,790,437 times
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Wondering why these obesity maps seem to be significant in your search for a place to move in the DC/MD area. Are you trying to avoid places with fat people? How reliable are these maps? The reporting may not be accurate from county to county.

If I remember correctly, Colorado has a very low percentage of obese people. That high altitude keeps people's metabolisms revved up.
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Old 12-07-2011, 06:50 PM
 
Location: Macao
15,996 posts, read 37,248,691 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by uggabugga View Post
didn't you also start an obesity thread in the michigan forum?

what is this, obesity week?
Michigan's my home state, and Maryland/DC is where I'm thinking I might move to. So just sharing the map for those two states.
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Old 12-08-2011, 07:35 AM
 
30,315 posts, read 20,635,892 times
Reputation: 16305
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
Michigan's my home state, and Maryland/DC is where I'm thinking I might move to. So just sharing the map for those two states.
i lived in southern michigan and moved to maryland 3 1/2 years ago, and there definitely is less of an obesity issue here than there.

i think you posted one map where michigan appeared to be off by itself, away from the 'fat belt,' but in reality both indiana and ohio were only about half a percentage point away from being moved into that highest category.
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