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Old 12-04-2011, 09:31 PM
 
Location: Edgemere, Maryland
501 posts, read 1,013,481 times
Reputation: 175

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Quote:
Originally Posted by westsideboy View Post
Keeping the open land is nice, but if you lose the natives who are attached to it, what have you really preserved?
This is a good point. Guess you (Maryland) can't win in this situation, can you?
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Old 12-04-2011, 10:16 PM
 
542 posts, read 1,321,543 times
Reputation: 354
Quote:
Originally Posted by westsideboy View Post
It is my understanding that most of the "farming" regions around the dense areas in Europe are heavily subsidized by the government or else they wouldn't exist.
Precisely. What works there may not work in the United States, and vice versa. European countries are many times smaller than America, and their cities have been around for much longer. The social centers, among other things, is located within their urban centers --- it's been that way for centuries. In many ways, Europe still maintains the rigid, centralized feudal/classist society that's been in place for centuries. These factors contribute in making European cities what they are.

Though it has urban areas, I've never felt that America as a whole is an urban country. It's much larger, there's more land, and the American spirit has always been about individualism and maintaining personal space. Basically, "freedom". We have problems with sprawl, and we would like to curtail that, but that's the way it is. By its foundation, America is a very "decentralized" country. Adopting a European sensibilities I feel wouldn't serve to solve the problem -- only Europeanize urban centers of America(in which some already are, both from their founding past and the gentrified present).
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Old 12-04-2011, 10:30 PM
 
Location: Cumberland
5,257 posts, read 8,454,389 times
Reputation: 3690
Quote:
Originally Posted by KeyserSoze View Post
Precisely. What works there may not work in the United States, and vice versa. European countries are many times smaller than America, and their cities have been around for much longer. The social centers, among other things, is located within their urban centers --- it's been that way for centuries. In many ways, Europe still maintains the rigid, centralized feudal/classist society that's been in place for centuries. These factors contribute in making European cities what they are.

Though it has urban areas, I've never felt that America as a whole is an urban country. It's much larger, there's more land, and the American spirit has always been about individualism and maintaining personal space. Basically, "freedom". We have problems with sprawl, and we would like to curtail that, but that's the way it is. By its foundation, America is a very "decentralized" country. Adopting a European sensibilities I feel wouldn't serve to solve the problem -- only Europeanize urban centers of America(in which some already are, both from their founding past and the gentrified present).
Great post.
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Old 12-04-2011, 11:17 PM
 
Location: Macao
15,996 posts, read 37,248,691 times
Reputation: 9617
Quote:
Originally Posted by westsideboy View Post
It is my understanding that most of the "farming" regions around the dense areas in Europe are heavily subsidized by the government or else they wouldn't exist.
Farming is also heavily subsidized in the U.S. as well though.
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Old 12-05-2011, 04:28 AM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
34,792 posts, read 44,295,495 times
Reputation: 44930
Quote:
Originally Posted by MDguy99 View Post
I highly doubt it will stop the sprawl. Look at a projected growth map - mass transit is not going to stop that kind of mass influx. It won't be many more years before fullblown suburbia is knocking on this guy's door. He's at a virtual vortex of where the suburbs of Baltimore and DC will converge over the next 10-20 years. I suggest that any young person just starting off who wishes to live a rural life make plans to settle down somewhere besides Maryland because in 50 years, the state will be little more than one giant suburb.

There are some pretty strict statewide growth controls in the pipeline right now are scheduled for adoption in the next year or two. These have nothing at all to do with O'Malley's proposal to restrict septic systems, although that is a piece of it.

Essentially what you're going to see is Glendening's Smart Growth and Shaffer's MD2020 on steroids. Growth in rural areas without infrastructure like adequate schools, roads, sewer and water, etc. are going to be starved of state funds to build them. The idea is to direct the growth to the town centers that have that infrastructure in place and to encourage in-fill construction, especially in the close-in suburbs that are considered at least marginally blighted. Also encouraged in these areas is multi-family housing such as apartments and townhouses (which make more money for the builders/developers anyway). A suburban town center like Dunkirk in Calvert County can't really grow much more since it doesn't have water and sewer under the new guidelines, although commercial development is encouraged.

Most of the Counties in the central core and Southern MD have adopted various growth control strategies already like transferable development rights which pay farmers for the right to not build on their land in exchange for allowing greater density in the unincorporated town centers. Gives the farmers a chunk of money and takes their property out of play for development and preserves it as open space/agriculture.
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Old 12-05-2011, 10:48 AM
 
Location: Mount. Airy
53 posts, read 92,871 times
Reputation: 21
me and the rest of my relatives have been farming in this area for over 175 years we are very proud of our community and we know 60% of the population to us it is still a farming area because we know all the farmers around we love our community and the people in it
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Old 12-14-2011, 05:19 AM
 
7 posts, read 16,286 times
Reputation: 25
Default Woodbine is a Farming Area

I live in Woodbine and commute to DC and I consider it a farming area. I spent much of my youth in Columbia and had never heard of Woodbine until our realtor showed us our current house in a small subdivision cut out of a farm. Many farms in Woodbine participate in agricultural preservation programs, so the rural character of the area should be safe from development for a while. But eventually, I agree that it will become in-fill for growth between DC and Baltimore, with growth from Eastern HoCo pushing ever westward. There are a few farms in the Clarksville area that are likely to go sooner given the strong demand to be in the River Hill High School district, but after that, the pressure will increasingly mount to develop more of western HoCo.
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