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Old 01-05-2012, 07:50 PM
 
Location: Fort Worth, TX
9,396 posts, read 14,052,041 times
Reputation: 6252

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D.C. man charged in fatal December stabbing had served time for 2005 slaying - The Washington Post

Long story short: A woman was killed in DC last month by a guy who killed a man in Baltimore in 2005. He pleaded guilty to manslaughter and was sentenced to eight years in the joint. He only served five.

Hopefully he never leaves a jail cell again. And hopefully some day this state will come to its senses and actually punish violent, dangerous people.
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Old 01-06-2012, 04:20 AM
 
Location: NYC
7,256 posts, read 11,550,675 times
Reputation: 3634
Quote:
Originally Posted by HurricaneDC View Post
Hopefully he never leaves a jail cell again. And hopefully some day this state will come to its senses and actually punish violent, dangerous people.
Are you willing to pay more taxes to incarcerate people for longer (more prisons, more workers)? I don't think many are.
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Old 01-06-2012, 07:48 AM
 
44 posts, read 101,195 times
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I am willing to pay that price for clean streets, and to decrease the chances of people being victimized by repeat offenders. I also am willing to pay the price for extra ammo, rope, needles, and electricity for the death penalty in MD.
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Old 01-06-2012, 08:01 AM
 
Location: Fort Worth, TX
9,396 posts, read 14,052,041 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HandsUpThumbsDown View Post
Are you willing to pay more taxes to incarcerate people for longer (more prisons, more workers)? I don't think many are.
We can also have more sensible laws. Some guy slinging dope really doesn't need 15 years in the pen, someone who takes a life definitely does (and then some).
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Old 01-06-2012, 10:53 AM
 
Location: NYC
7,256 posts, read 11,550,675 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HurricaneDC View Post
We can also have more sensible laws. Some guy slinging dope really doesn't need 15 years in the pen, someone who takes a life definitely does (and then some).
I agree. punishing someone for selling dope is rather dumb, but actually "correcting" that behavior is quite smart. Unforunately our departments of "corrections" are more punitive than anything.
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Old 01-06-2012, 12:57 PM
 
Location: Bodymore, Murderland
568 posts, read 1,226,593 times
Reputation: 346
Quote:
Originally Posted by Batista GT View Post
I am willing to pay that price for clean streets, and to decrease the chances of people being victimized by repeat offenders. I also am willing to pay the price for extra ammo, rope, needles, and electricity for the death penalty in MD.
Those items are a recurring cost. Screw that. However, I'm willing to pay for a headsman's axe. From a taxpayers perspective, it's a one-time cost and re-usable too. They wouldn't even have to worry about disinfecting it either.

These criminals aren't worth wasting bullets or electricity on.
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Old 01-06-2012, 01:02 PM
 
309 posts, read 631,170 times
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The maximum penalty of a crime and the time people REALLY do serve are two completely different things (see OP's post). A drug dealer getting 15 years is a little farfetched. There are many problems with the criminal justice system, but in regards to cost there are a lot of things that can be controlled. There are convicts have it better in prison than they do on the street. Decent meals, plenty of programs and free college education. I think it is important to have someone propertly reintegrated back into society when their time is almost up, however I firmly disagree with all of the benefits that convicts have today that us taxpayers are paying for. Prison is SUPPOSE to be a bad place.
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Old 01-06-2012, 01:40 PM
 
Location: NYC
7,256 posts, read 11,550,675 times
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Originally Posted by tgs_bg View Post
Prison is SUPPOSE to be a bad place.
Yeah, but how does that repair a broken person? Or does it just make them more F'd up?
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Old 01-06-2012, 03:44 PM
 
Location: Cumberland
5,259 posts, read 8,462,679 times
Reputation: 3691
Quote:
Originally Posted by HandsUpThumbsDown View Post
Yeah, but how does that repair a broken person? Or does it just make them more F'd up?
Yes, I would gladly pay more to keep people in jail. As I see it, we either pay the DOC to keep them locked up, or we pay Social Services to have them live among us. I would chose the former every time.

I don't care so much about "repairing" people, people have free will and have to pay the consequences for violating others. If you do wrong, you go to jail, don't pass GO, don't collect $200. If you come out and screw up again, then back to jail you go, hopefully for good.

But, good point about drug laws. Something should be done about that to separate the harmless user from the dumb-butt addict or dealer that commits other crimes to support their weakness.

I will say that the myth of the "non-violent" drug offender being sentenced to hard time is somewhat overblown.

Most of the "drug offenders" that get hard time are easily cross referenced with thefts, robberies, assaults, etc. Many times we are lucky the police are able to nail them on a drug charge to put them away, those cases are normally much easier to prove than the others. A bad person taken out of society is a good thing.
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Old 01-07-2012, 06:01 AM
 
309 posts, read 631,170 times
Reputation: 192
Quote:
Originally Posted by HandsUpThumbsDown View Post
Yeah, but how does that repair a broken person? Or does it just make them more F'd up?
Like I said, I support reintegration, but the current CJ system absolutely coddles offenders. An offender that is a "broken person" has plenty of opportunity and programs within probation to "fix" him. You don't even get any real time for a crime unless you do something absolutely heinous or multiple repetitions of the same crime over a period of time. The problem is the majority of offenders won't take personal responsibility, and the CJ system waits too late to deliver true punishment when need be


Not trying to touch on the lesser sentence for drug offenses topic again, but an example with what I said: If a junkie keeps getting arrested for possession, how many times are we going to try to "fix" him with diversion and detox programs? Some people just don't want to be "fixed" (or can't). Hard time itself can be the solution at times because it gives an offender a reason not to commit that crime again

I think my beef with all of this is that there are luxuries that convicts are getting, that we are paying for, that not all of us law-abiting citizens can afford. Call me crazy but I just don't think that that's right.




I'm curious to see how you guys feel about DUI's and their penalities.
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