U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Celebrating Memorial Day!
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Maryland
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 08-15-2009, 06:40 PM
 
Location: Anne Arundel County, MD
41 posts, read 161,704 times
Reputation: 35

Advertisements

I've lived in Anne Arundel county my whole life, mostly in Annapolis. I feel that this area of Maryland has more in common with the northern states than the southern ones. The culture and environment you'll get in Annapolis is very colonial and historical, kind of like New England. But when I go to Southern MD or the Eastern Shore to visit my relatives it feels more like the south. The southern hospitality is very present in both of these areas.

And Baltimore doesn't really remind me of the North or the South, it seems somewhere in between. For such a small state, Maryland has many different types of towns and cities.

 
Old 08-15-2009, 06:51 PM
 
542 posts, read 1,326,967 times
Reputation: 354
Quote:
Originally Posted by Murland View Post
I've lived in Anne Arundel county my whole life, mostly in Annapolis. I feel that this area of Maryland has more in common with the northern states than the southern ones. The culture and environment you'll get in Annapolis is very colonial and historical, kind of like New England. But when I go to Southern MD or the Eastern Shore to visit my relatives it feels more like the south. The southern hospitality is very present in both of these areas.

And Baltimore doesn't really remind me of the North or the South, it seems somewhere in between. For such a small state, Maryland has many different types of towns and cities.
To me, Annapolis looks & feels more like a historic Virginia city, like Fredericksburg. And Anne Arundel has always felt pretty quintessential "Maryland"/Southern to me. I guess it's just the water.

I agree with you about Baltimore, though. It feels more like a mix between the two than just one or the other.
 
Old 08-15-2009, 10:09 PM
 
14 posts, read 79,524 times
Reputation: 14
Default do Maryland residents consider themselves as "Southerners?"

Oh hell no! You mean Maryland next to PA and Jersey?

Quote:
There are plenty of rednecks in Southern MD...
And in California also! (Bakersfield, Barstow) That doesn't make Maryland
the south!


Quote:
I feel "redneck" is a disparaging term and for counties that are among the wealthiest in the county, I doubt they dominate the area. Also, remember that rural does not equal "southern," I'm sure if you go to Penn., Ohio, or upstate NY you'll see the same type of people you're describing (without the 10oz beers ).

Exactly!
 
Old 08-15-2009, 10:58 PM
 
Location: Maryland
408 posts, read 646,882 times
Reputation: 484
After years of being TOO southern for the Philly and all point North crowd and not Southern enough for everyone from Richmond (really, Spotsylvania) and down, I believe I can't categorize it as either. There are so many elements of both.
 
Old 08-16-2009, 04:43 AM
 
Location: Greenville, Delaware
4,726 posts, read 10,616,343 times
Reputation: 2604
[quote=GeekChick;10298156]Oh hell no! You mean Maryland next to PA and Jersey?
quote]

Next to Jersey? I don't think so.
 
Old 08-16-2009, 11:24 PM
 
1,599 posts, read 3,004,164 times
Reputation: 1213
[quote=doctorjef;10300164]
Quote:
Originally Posted by GeekChick View Post
Oh hell no! You mean Maryland next to PA and Jersey?
quote]

Next to Jersey? I don't think so.
Delaware just doesn't get any respect or recognition.
 
Old 08-16-2009, 11:32 PM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, NC, formerly DC and Phila
8,790 posts, read 13,201,669 times
Reputation: 8676
When I grew up in Pennsylvania, I always thought of Maryland as "The South." Then when I went to college, I became friends with a couple of girls from Baltimore, and they laughed at me. They did not think of themselves as being from the South. Now that I live in Northern Virginia, I agree that Baltimore and DC are more like Mid-Atlantic states. Having said that, I think certain parts of the state are somewhat southern.
 
Old 08-17-2009, 02:18 PM
 
Location: Maryland
96 posts, read 93,987 times
Reputation: 34
This could help ..........


History of Maryland - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia



Governor Hicks prevented Maryland from seceding in 1861.


The first bloodshed of the Civil War occurred in Baltimore involving Massachusetts troops who were fired on while marching between railroad stations on April 19, 1861. After that, Baltimore Mayor George William Brown, Marshal George P. Kane, and former Governor Enoch Louis Lowe requested that Maryland Governor Thomas H. Hicks, a slave owner from the Eastern Shore, burn the railroad bridges and cut the telegraph lines leading to Baltimore to prevent further troops from entering the state. Hicks reportedly approved this proposal. These actions were addressed in the famous federal court case of Ex parte Merryman.
Maryland remained part of the Union during the United States Civil War. President Abraham Lincoln's strong hand suppressing violence and dissent in Maryland and the belated assistance of Governor Hicks played important roles. Hicks worked with federal officials to stop further violence.
Marylanders sympathetic to the South easily crossed the Potomac River to join and fight for the Confederacy. Exiles organized a "Maryland Line" in the Army of Northern Virginia which consisted of one infantry regiment, one infantry battalion, two cavalry battalions and four battalions of artillery. According to the best extant records, up to 25,000 Marylanders went south to fight for the Confederacy. About 60,000 Maryland men served in all branches of the Union military. However, many of the Union troops were said to enlist on the promise of home garrison duty.
 
Old 08-17-2009, 06:56 PM
 
Location: Germantown, MD
1,359 posts, read 3,359,290 times
Reputation: 569
Quote:
Originally Posted by Giantwon View Post
This could help ..........


History of Maryland - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia



Governor Hicks prevented Maryland from seceding in 1861.


The first bloodshed of the Civil War occurred in Baltimore involving Massachusetts troops who were fired on while marching between railroad stations on April 19, 1861. After that, Baltimore Mayor George William Brown, Marshal George P. Kane, and former Governor Enoch Louis Lowe requested that Maryland Governor Thomas H. Hicks, a slave owner from the Eastern Shore, burn the railroad bridges and cut the telegraph lines leading to Baltimore to prevent further troops from entering the state. Hicks reportedly approved this proposal. These actions were addressed in the famous federal court case of Ex parte Merryman.
Maryland remained part of the Union during the United States Civil War. President Abraham Lincoln's strong hand suppressing violence and dissent in Maryland and the belated assistance of Governor Hicks played important roles. Hicks worked with federal officials to stop further violence.
Marylanders sympathetic to the South easily crossed the Potomac River to join and fight for the Confederacy. Exiles organized a "Maryland Line" in the Army of Northern Virginia which consisted of one infantry regiment, one infantry battalion, two cavalry battalions and four battalions of artillery. According to the best extant records, up to 25,000 Marylanders went south to fight for the Confederacy. About 60,000 Maryland men served in all branches of the Union military. However, many of the Union troops were said to enlist on the promise of home garrison duty.
Yeah, but does that make Maryland (in 2009) Southern? There were large numbers of Southern sympathizers in Indiana, Pennsylvania, Maine, and Ohio, many of whom would probably have rioted if given the chance. Governor Hicks later voiced his support for the Union and prevented secession, but was more neutral than anything else. Also, while Baltimore, Anne Arundel County, and the Shore may have had secessionists. Western MD, and the Washington suburbs were staunchly pro-Union. Hicks organized a special session of the legislature to prevent secession, and the state legislators unanimously (this was after Lincoln had some arrested) turned down secession.

Here's a more in depth article about Maryland in the Civil War: Maryland in the American Civil War - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Disclaimer: Whoever wrote both articles seems to have a bias. If you read them carefully, the North/Union is almost always shed in a negative light, and it seems the author wished Maryland was a Confederate state. Ah, wikipedia...
 
Old 08-17-2009, 07:25 PM
 
542 posts, read 1,326,967 times
Reputation: 354
Quote:
Originally Posted by cpterp View Post
Yeah, but does that make Maryland (in 2009) Southern? There were large numbers of Southern sympathizers in Indiana, Pennsylvania, Maine, and Ohio, many of whom would probably have rioted if given the chance. Governor Hicks later voiced his support for the Union and prevented secession, but was more neutral than anything else. Also, while Baltimore, Anne Arundel County, and the Shore may have had secessionists. Western MD, and the Washington suburbs were staunchly pro-Union. Hicks organized a special session of the legislature to prevent secession, and the state legislators unanimously (this was after Lincoln had some arrested) turned down secession.

Here's a more in depth article about Maryland in the Civil War: Maryland in the American Civil War - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Disclaimer: Whoever wrote both articles seems to have a bias. If you read them carefully, the North/Union is almost always shed in a negative light, and it seems the author wished Maryland was a Confederate state. Ah, wikipedia...
The Washington suburbs during that time period actually leaned more neturally/towards the Confederate side. The city itself didn't. The difference between Southern sympathizers in Maryland and those in Indiana/Pennsylvania/Maine/Ohio is that Marylanders were actually part of the South(most of it anyway), and I feel that they still are today. Obviously it's changed a lot since that time(as has the rest of the South), and I think we can all agree that Southern Maryland & the shore are at least part of the (Coastal) South, but the state by and large has Southern roots.
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Closed Thread


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2020 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Maryland
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top