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Old 04-15-2020, 06:19 AM
 
Location: Boston
1,518 posts, read 499,243 times
Reputation: 1290

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Quote:
Originally Posted by htfdcolt View Post
I'm not single, but I'm guessing the whole culture of partying, casual dating, and hookups will change radically during and maybe after this pandemic!
Do that many people really think this will have long-lasting/permanent changes to personal interactions? When I walk down the street today, I'd say 3 out of 5 people still aren't really distancing or wearing masks, and I imagine once the all-clear is given, there'll be a rush on reservations to favorite restaurants.

I think things that people didn't really like in the first place (riding a bus, flying in the middle seat) will see some adjustments, but people aren't going to give up the highlights of their week for long. Casual dating, hookups, and friends with benefits will still be commonplace after the pandemic, much to the chagrin of old church ladies everywhere.
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Old 04-15-2020, 06:24 AM
 
5,458 posts, read 2,366,670 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by id77 View Post
I think things that people didn't really like in the first place (riding a bus, flying in the middle seat) will see some adjustments, but people aren't going to give up the highlights of their week for long. Casual dating, hookups, and friends with benefits will still be commonplace after the pandemic, much to the chagrin of old church ladies everywhere.
I think the sharing economy might be over for good. For instance places like "savers" where you buy used things or Air B & B.

It is possible these thing will come back but not, I think, for a long time after we all start going back places.
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Old 04-15-2020, 06:36 AM
 
13,197 posts, read 14,995,276 times
Reputation: 17770
Quote:
Originally Posted by id77 View Post
Do that many people really think this will have long-lasting/permanent changes to personal interactions? When I walk down the street today, I'd say 3 out of 5 people still aren't really distancing or wearing masks, and I imagine once the all-clear is given, there'll be a rush on reservations to favorite restaurants.
I notice that too.

I've said it before, but traffic has picked up over the last week or so. When lockdown began, I could get out on the highway at 8AM and be the only car there. Now i'm in traffic (although flowing at 70-80MPH). There;s definitely more people out and about.

Over the weekend, I grabbed a coffee at dunks and parked in the parking lot to answer some emails. In pulled 3 cars that went through the drive-tru and then parked. Out came 6-7 people and 3 dogs and they proceeded to drink their coffee while standing 2-3 feet from each other and BSing for about 15 mins. Then they got in their cars and left.

But then I see the extreme opposite, where I witness people gown up in PPE when they pump gas, donning a mask, gloves and sometimes a face shield. (mostly older people). I actually see more and more of this each day, vs the first example. People are getting it and learning how to be out, and be safe.

SO if the switch got flipped tomorrow, I think you'll see a rush, but not from everyone. Some will be cautious and see how things go, and some will call up a hotel or restaurant or book a flight and just go.


I fall somewhere in the middle. In the beginning, I was anxious about all this (back in Feb/early march). Now, I don't care...and have gotten used to the new normal. I'm taking precautions and avoid specific behaviors and places, but the stress of all this is gone for me and I haven't been taking extreme measures. I'm still going out daily (to work and to get supplies) and am being as safe as I can, but I haven't been locked up in my house this whole time. I, probably, will refrain from going into public for a while when the economy "reopens", so it will probably be a gradual easing back into old behaviors.

Mental health, of course, is a huge concern for all. Some people are reaching their breaking point and some people are thriving in the aspect of social distancing. My wife is a social butterfly and has been stressed out for weeks. I really need to pay attention to her to help her through this. I'm an introvert by nature, and was built for social distancing.
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Old 04-15-2020, 06:38 AM
 
Location: Boston
1,518 posts, read 499,243 times
Reputation: 1290
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arya Stark View Post
I think the sharing economy might be over for good. For instance places like "savers" where you buy used things or Air B & B.

It is possible these thing will come back but not, I think, for a long time after we all start going back places.
I see those staying for two reasons (though it's really one from two perspectives):

1. The sellers/renters need the money. Things like AirBnB and Uber are side-gigs that keep some people afloat.

2. The buyers of those services do it to save money. The typical budget traveler galavanting about Europe can't afford to stay in a Marriott every night, so they're going to do things like AirBnB.
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Old 04-15-2020, 06:46 AM
 
Location: Boston
1,518 posts, read 499,243 times
Reputation: 1290
Quote:
Originally Posted by BostonMike7 View Post
I notice that too.

I've said it before, but traffic has picked up over the last week or so. When lockdown began, I could get out on the highway at 8AM and be the only car there. Now i'm in traffic (although flowing at 70-80MPH). There;s definitely more people out and about.

Over the weekend, I grabbed a coffee at dunks and parked in the parking lot to answer some emails. In pulled 3 cars that went through the drive-tru and then parked. Out came 6-7 people and 3 dogs and they proceeded to drink their coffee while standing 2-3 feet from each other and BSing for about 15 mins. Then they got in their cars and left.

But then I see the extreme opposite, where I witness people gown up in PPE when they pump gas, donning a mask, gloves and sometimes a face shield. (mostly older people).

SO if the switch got flipped tomorrow, I think you'll see a rush, but not from everyone. Some will be cautious and see how things go, and some will call up a hotel or restaurant or book a flight and just go.


I fall somewhere in the middle. In the beginning, I was anxious about all this (back in Feb/early march). Now, I don't care...and have gotten used to the new normal. I'm taking precautions and avoid specific behaviors and places, but the stress of all this is gone for me. I, probably, will refrain from going into public for a while when the economy "reopens", so it will probably be a gradual easing back into old behaviors.

Mental health, of course, is a huge concern for all. Some people are reaching their breaking point and some people are thriving in the aspect of social distancing. My wife is a social butterfly and has been stressed out for weeks. I really need to pay attention to her to help her through this. I'm an introvert by nature, and was built for social distancing.
Agreed. Some people will hide in fear for years to come while others will bust right back to normal the second the light turns green.

I see some people so paralyzed with fear over this (even before the quarantines) that they go to what I'd consider ridiculous (and often placebo) extremes to give them the warm fuzzies they're safe. Last month in line at Heathrow customs, a mother and child in front of us were in full biohazard suits, but of course had to remove their faceguards and masks when they got up to the officer. Their suitcases were in plastic bags. Or people in grocery lines with the 6' distancing freak out at 5'8" distancing, as if there's some magical line at exactly 6' that renders you safe.

On the other end, I also see a lot of people who aren't letting this change their life one bit more than it must. I also wonder how many of them are doing nothing just to push the buttons of those who are in full anxious meltdown mode.
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Old 04-15-2020, 06:58 AM
 
Location: East Boston, MA
10,286 posts, read 18,387,831 times
Reputation: 11989
Quote:
Originally Posted by id77 View Post
Do that many people really think this will have long-lasting/permanent changes to personal interactions? When I walk down the street today, I'd say 3 out of 5 people still aren't really distancing or wearing masks, and I imagine once the all-clear is given, there'll be a rush on reservations to favorite restaurants.

I think things that people didn't really like in the first place (riding a bus, flying in the middle seat) will see some adjustments, but people aren't going to give up the highlights of their week for long. Casual dating, hookups, and friends with benefits will still be commonplace after the pandemic, much to the chagrin of old church ladies everywhere.
The problem is that I think it'll be a looooooooooooong time before we get an "all-clear." We'll see a gradual, phases rollout of "normal" practices. So I while I wouldn't expect too many permanent changes, I DO expect fairly long-term changes until we've developed sufficient herd immunity and/or found a vaccine that has been distributed widely. Neither of those things are likely to happen in the next 12 months.

I think you'll see a few things change in the short term:
  1. People will drive more. Generally people prefer their own vehicles to public transit anyway. The crushing blow that the COVID shut down has dealt to the economy means millions of people who were commuting to jobs in cities around the country are no longer doing so. That means traffic won't be as bad until this economy rebounds to pre-COVID-19 levels which won't be quick. So instead of risking it on transit, people will drive until traffic becomes a prohibitive force like it had become for many.
  2. People will walk/bike more. Those of us closer in to the city center will realize that instead of packing on to a jammed train or bus to ride a mile or two, we can walk or bike the same distance in not much more (often less) time. Between coming to appreciate the fresh air and a new urge to distance, we'll see an uptick in this type of travel/commuting.
  3. Travel in general will remain down. Especially international travel. Airlines aren't going to send planes out with 1/3 of the seats empty because nobody wants a middle seat. It's not financially sustainable. Most airlines need to have planes 80% full (or more in the case of low cost carriers) to be profitable. So instead of blocking middle seats, they're going to reduce capacity and cut routes all together and lift fares. On top of that, many countries are going to have restrictions and practices that will make international travel a challenging exercise.
  4. Restaurants are going to hurt for a while. Even when they're allowed to reopen, distancing practices are going to prevent standing room only bars and tight table layouts. This is going to hurt restaurants, especially in cities, who bank on maximizing the amount of diners their limited square footage. One positive I hope for is more lax start up costs (i.e. permitting, licenses, and fees) as well as easing of restrictions on outdoor seating.
  5. Home sales in the city are going to take a temporary hit. I don't think cities are going to be permanently damaged by this. Especially as rural and suburban cases tick up too. But I think buyers are going to look to the 'burbs with renewed vigor for the next couple of years. Especially if traffic also dips and makes commuting to downtown easier from the suburbs.
  6. Masks will be more common in the long run. This is true in Asia where it's been a thing for some time, but I think masks will be the norm for years to come. At least during cold/flu season.
  7. Telework becomes more widespread. At least as a partial option for some. Office work isn't going anywhere, but I think a lot of places are seeing that they can have good productivity with teleworkers.
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Old 04-15-2020, 07:05 AM
 
7,165 posts, read 4,165,188 times
Reputation: 7927
She is also an anit-vaxxer, is against social distancing measures, and organized a protest against restrictions put in place by the Kalispell, MT city council. She is strong Libertarian, leans conservative, had to leave a medical practice because she wouldn't stop proselytizing to patients, and led an initiative to give personhood to fertilized eggs in storage.

Now saying all that - she has the right to say what she wants but it's her opinion, not fact.
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Old 04-15-2020, 07:08 AM
 
Location: Boston
1,518 posts, read 499,243 times
Reputation: 1290
Quote:
Originally Posted by lrfox View Post
The problem is that I think it'll be a looooooooooooong time before we get an "all-clear." We'll see a gradual, phases rollout of "normal" practices. So I while I wouldn't expect too many permanent changes, I DO expect fairly long-term changes until we've developed sufficient herd immunity and/or found a vaccine that has been distributed widely. Neither of those things are likely to happen in the next 12 months.

I think you'll see a few things change in the short term:
  1. People will drive more. Generally people prefer their own vehicles to public transit anyway. The crushing blow that the COVID shut down has dealt to the economy means millions of people who were commuting to jobs in cities around the country are no longer doing so. That means traffic won't be as bad until this economy rebounds to pre-COVID-19 levels which won't be quick. So instead of risking it on transit, people will drive until traffic becomes a prohibitive force like it had become for many.
  2. People will walk/bike more. Those of us closer in to the city center will realize that instead of packing on to a jammed train or bus to ride a mile or two, we can walk or bike the same distance in not much more (often less) time. Between coming to appreciate the fresh air and a new urge to distance, we'll see an uptick in this type of travel/commuting.
  3. Travel in general will remain down. Especially international travel. Airlines aren't going to send planes out with 1/3 of the seats empty because nobody wants a middle seat. It's not financially sustainable. Most airlines need to have planes 80% full (or more in the case of low cost carriers) to be profitable. So instead of blocking middle seats, they're going to reduce capacity and cut routes all together and lift fares. On top of that, many countries are going to have restrictions and practices that will make international travel a challenging exercise.
  4. Restaurants are going to hurt for a while. Even when they're allowed to reopen, distancing practices are going to prevent standing room only bars and tight table layouts. This is going to hurt restaurants, especially in cities, who bank on maximizing the amount of diners their limited square footage. One positive I hope for is more lax start up costs (i.e. permitting, licenses, and fees) as well as easing of restrictions on outdoor seating.
  5. Home sales in the city are going to take a temporary hit. I don't think cities are going to be permanently damaged by this. Especially as rural and suburban cases tick up too. But I think buyers are going to look to the 'burbs with renewed vigor for the next couple of years. Especially if traffic also dips and makes commuting to downtown easier from the suburbs.
  6. Masks will be more common in the long run. This is true in Asia where it's been a thing for some time, but I think masks will be the norm for years to come. At least during cold/flu season.
  7. Telework becomes more widespread. At least as a partial option for some. Office work isn't going anywhere, but I think a lot of places are seeing that they can have good productivity with teleworkers.
Drive and bike more, sure. I always made it a point to walk to DTX rather than take the green/orange line, but I also had the luxury of time most days when some people didn't. Telework also, but I've also been teleworking for years now so this was no change at all for me. I always argued it saved costs by not leasing a building or paying associated costs to house me when I can just do it from home for free instead.

I'm not so sold on the others. It makes the assumption that people are distancing in fear of catching this, and I just don't believe that's the case for many people, particularly within the under-50 crowd. They're distancing because it's required or they're guilted/shamed into it because they're horrible monsters killing Nana if they don't. As soon as that messaging changes, many will rip off the masks and go back to life as it was before.
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Old 04-15-2020, 07:24 AM
 
2,674 posts, read 1,009,738 times
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Default Re

Quote:
Originally Posted by id77 View Post
Drive and bike more, sure. I always made it a point to walk to DTX rather than take the green/orange line, but I also had the luxury of time most days when some people didn't. Telework also, but I've also been teleworking for years now so this was no change at all for me. I always argued it saved costs by not leasing a building or paying associated costs to house me when I can just do it from home for free instead.

I'm not so sold on the others. It makes the assumption that people are distancing in fear of catching this, and I just don't believe that's the case for many people, particularly within the under-50 crowd. They're distancing because it's required or they're guilted/shamed into it because they're horrible monsters killing Nana if they don't. As soon as that messaging changes, many will rip off the masks and go back to life as it was before.
Im 41 and I’m afraid of getting it.
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Old 04-15-2020, 07:40 AM
 
1,885 posts, read 552,959 times
Reputation: 804
Sports are deemed a essential service in florida now. I believe the sport has to be nationially telivised though to qualify. There will be no fans or audience.

The WWE had a live event a couple of days ago with no auidence.

https://www.usatoday.com/story/sport...is/2987675001/
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