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Old 01-19-2021, 02:19 PM
 
18,445 posts, read 10,392,857 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BostonBornMassMade View Post
But you're literally disregarding the 35% that have college degrees. And the fact that half of all households make more than the median income. Black people aren't expecting All black professionals. Just a community where there are some within a quick drive. Our standards for these type of things unfortunately arent as high and were very accustomed to living in more socioeconomically diverse neighborhoods-even in the blackest of regions.

You cant be buddy-buddy with all of Bloomfield or Randolph. You only need a crew of like 4-6 people, and they each need like 3 people and you've got yourself enough of a social circle.l It's not that deep as people are making it seem because white people have more options and look at numbers differently.

At the end of the day, there a big difference between a town that visibly has black people and has 3-400 black professional families (Stoughton or Dedham) and a town that doesn't have a visible black population at all and has 10-20 black professional families (Boxford or Rowley) ...

Nonsense. The gold plated suburbs start at 60% college educated. And college degrees are not all created equally. You're not going to see many highly educated white collar professionals from top schools in a town where 35% have college degrees. The school system is not going to perform well enough for them.
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Old 01-19-2021, 02:35 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GeoffD View Post
The gold plated suburbs start at 60% college educated.
The Massachusetts average is 42%.
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Old 01-19-2021, 02:45 PM
 
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I don't even know what percentage of my town is college educated, nor any town I lived in for that matter.


Maybe I should be worried?
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Old 01-19-2021, 06:03 PM
 
Location: Baltimore
10,065 posts, read 3,949,921 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GeoffD View Post
Nonsense. The gold plated suburbs start at 60% college educated. And college degrees are not all created equally. You're not going to see many highly educated white collar professionals from top schools in a town where 35% have college degrees. The school system is not going to perform well enough for them.
in one ear and out the other.

https://www.nytimes.com/2015/06/25/u...hborhoods.html

"Even among white and black families with similar incomes, white families are much more likely to live in good neighborhoods — with high-quality schools, day-care options, parks, playgrounds and transportation options. The study comes to this conclusion by mining census data and uncovering a striking pattern: White (and Asian-American) middle-income families tend to live in middle-income neighborhoods. Black middle-income families tend to live in distinctly lower-income ones.

Most strikingly, the typical middle-income black family lives in a neighborhood with lower incomes than the typical low-income white family.

Consider these numbers: A typical black child living in a household with $100,000 in annual income lives in a neighborhood with a median income of $54,400
"

The gaps are largest across much of the Northeast and Midwest.The two metropolitan areas where black and white children of similar family incomes grow up in the most economically different neighborhoods are Milwaukee and Newark. In both, a typical white family with $50,000 in annual income lives in a neighborhood with a median income 1.8 times larger than a typical black family making $50,000.


Not far behind those two areas are: Gary, Ind.; Bridgeport and Hartford, Conn.; Buffalo; Albany; Chicago; and Philadelphia. Among the 100 largest metro areas, the 25 with the largest gaps also include Cleveland, Detroit, Boston, New York and Baltimore."


but- by all means, ill defer your understanding of the black middle class and how we navigate the world.

Surely you have some insights on the majors of Black adults in Bloomfield Connecticut you'd like to share.
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Old 01-19-2021, 06:05 PM
 
Location: Baltimore
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GeoffD View Post
Nonsense. The gold plated suburbs start at 60% college educated. And college degrees are not all created equally. You're not going to see many highly educated white collar professionals from top schools in a town where 35% have college degrees. The school system is not going to perform well enough for them.
No white-collar highly educated professionals in Boston, school systems not good enough for them.
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Old 01-19-2021, 06:07 PM
 
817 posts, read 358,553 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BostonBornMassMade View Post
No white-collar highly educated professionals in Boston, school systems not good enough for them.
That's not a problem if you don't have kids.
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Old 01-19-2021, 06:14 PM
 
Location: Baltimore
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yesmaybe View Post
That's not a problem if you don't have kids.
Yet and still we all know tons of white-collar professionals with kids in Boston - they use private (or METCO) schools. Obviously, these folks can afford private schooling.

There are 12,000 black children in Boston who don't use Boston Public Schools...
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Old 01-19-2021, 06:21 PM
 
13 posts, read 5,802 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GeoffD View Post
My limited experience with Milton is that the black part is "wrong side of the tracks". My experience is dated but the people I know who are from Milton other than a Milton Academy family with a summer house in my town were Boston Irish white flight.
Does this include the Brush Hill historic District of Milton? My understanding is that this area is really nice and has a higher median home price then some of the neighborhoods in the "East" Milton. I am looking for a suburb with a handful of black and brown professionals. I value diversity rather than a homogenous neighborhood. I'm not looking to necessarily live in the "black part." My partner is white and I have a very diverse group of friends. I'm surprised by this description of Milton because many people we know describe it as a diverse, affluent town.
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Old 01-19-2021, 06:45 PM
 
Location: Baltimore
10,065 posts, read 3,949,921 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bestdogmom23 View Post
Does this include the Brush Hill historic District of Milton? My understanding is that this area is really nice and has a higher median home price then some of the neighborhoods in the "East" Milton. I am looking for a suburb with a handful of black and brown professionals. I value diversity rather than a homogenous neighborhood. I'm not looking to necessarily live in the "black part." My partner is white and I have a very diverse group of friends. I'm surprised by this description of Milton because many people we know describe it as a diverse, affluent town.
Brush Hill is extremely nice and affluent. https://www.google.com/maps/@42.2373...4!8i8192?hl=en

Good access to the interstate, hiking, Delphia Academy, Thatcher Montessori, Milton High and Tucker Elementary. It also puts you close to Canton, Houghton Pond, Dedham Legacy Place, and South Shore Plaza. There's a solid black population in just about any direction.
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Old 01-19-2021, 06:50 PM
 
Location: Hyde Park, MA
618 posts, read 732,610 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BostonBornMassMade
you mean to people in East Milton they think theyre in the good part of Milton?
Exactly. Regardless of the fact that the other West Milton census tract 4161.02 - Brush Hill Rd. (estimated median HHI of $250,001) has some really wealthy folks (of all races) and is the wealthiest census tract in town (negligible to folks who don't care about such things).

That being said folks in West Milton - census tract 4162 off of Blue Hill think they're in a better place than the other side of their "social area" which isn't necessarily the rest of Milton but Mattapan and Hyde Park (census tracts 1010.01, 1010.02, 1404, 1403 and 1402).

Folks in West Milton (especially those who live between Truman & Brook Rd) have a high degree of social proximity to Mattapan/Hyde Park. Milton residents are on the higher end of the economic spectrum and a number of professionals and business owners that operate within the Mattapan Sq., Cleary Sq., BHA corridor live in Milton.

East Milton residents and natives (at least my age cohort) tend to have a view of the aforementioned 4162 neighborhood above as being a not so great place because it's so closely integrated with Mattapan and Hyde Park whereas East Milton is more socially integrated with Quincy and Neponset/Lower Mills (Dorchester).

To the point though, anyone who thinks West Milton is the "rough side of the tracks" just doesn't understand the dynamics.

https://www.city-data.com/forum/atta...1&d=1611103460

Median HHI for West Milton - census tract 4162 (the neighborhood in question) was lower than the rest of the town at $107,333, The East Milton neighborhood in question - census tract 4164 was at $124,961. Obviously not the same but doesn't warrant claims that it's the rough side of the tracks.

Especially considering that the neighboring tracts of 4162 are 1403, 1404, 1010.01/02 which are between $54,267 - $77,248 HHI with 1402.02 (really nice HP neighborhood) being in the $77,249 - $105,313 HHI bracket.

What we can note is that the CT 4162 is 40.7% Black, CT 4163 15.4% Black, but CT 4164 was 0.1% Black (albeit 87% White, 8.1% Asian). For reference the Census tracts of 4163, 4161.01 (4.7% Black) and .02 (6.9% Black) all have a higher HHI than 4164.

https://www.city-data.com/forum/atta...1&d=1611103472

Source: https://data.census.gov/cedsci/map?q...mode=customize


Quote:
Originally Posted by Shrewsburried View Post
Your input aligns, I believe, with their point ... it's entirely or largely perception. I tend to agree. It's more of a density/housing stock preference, IMO.
100%.
Attached Thumbnails
Where do Affluent Black Families live in MA?-median-hhi.jpg   Where do Affluent Black Families live in MA?-african-american.jpg  

Last edited by MassNative2891; 01-19-2021 at 07:09 PM.. Reason: Adding Source
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