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Old 10-20-2009, 05:07 PM
 
82 posts, read 213,986 times
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We are house hunting in towns that are 30-40 minutes from Boston.

We did like some houses - very old neighborhoods (built in 60s).
Location is good.

One main issue..(well there are more) that bothered me was low sunlight ( I mean direct afternoon light) in kitchen and bathroom. Is this expecting too much . Our buget is 450K or less.
One of the houses faces east west.. Front yard is towards west. A large tree on the front yard. Tons of trees in the backyard. Not too dense. You could enjoy there and put hammocks. There is part of yard that has trees and that area is not usable..(just bunch of trees). We may have to chop down the one in front for sure if we get it.

I am wondering if others here have anything to say. Husband is not too worried about getting tons of direct light. We could make a window large or something. Am I being unreasonable.. There is one house we both liked .except for this issue and well there is a large pool in the backyard . It is a large pretty green lot. Well mainatined -nothing fancy.

Am I being a tree hater. Dont get me wrong, I love nature greenery and trees. But in this cold cold New England wont you want some direct sunlight in your house. Also how would you grow vegetable or other garden in a tree filled lot. I hate to kill trees.
May be we should not get those kind of houses?
But newer houses with plane yard also doesnt appeal to me.
Any opinions, suggestions, criticisms?
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Old 10-20-2009, 05:18 PM
 
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You don't want trees too close to your house anyway. Wait until there's a good wind blowing and you wonder just what's gonna happen. If any of them are pine trees, the needles are corrosive to roof shingles and shouldn't be close enough to drop needles on the roof.
I wouldn't decide on a house or not because trees make it dark, but I see nothing wrong with clearing some away from the house itself, for every reason.
I don't know how much difference in temperature some light makes. I have huge windows only on the south side of my house, and the sun does warm up the main room in the winter. In the summer, the angle of the sun is different, so there's light but no heat. (due to trees).
I've had several come down during windstorms. It's good to have a little space.
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Old 10-20-2009, 05:19 PM
 
15,823 posts, read 28,163,437 times
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P.S. I suspect you are from the South or West. "Very old neighborhoods" are not from "the '60s" unless you mean the 1860s. Or 1760s!
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Old 10-20-2009, 09:02 PM
 
270 posts, read 1,252,181 times
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Yes I agree, big trees too close to the house are not such a good idea and I would avoid that kind of property. Sunlight would only be a secondary concern although I understand how you feel about the light.
Shortly after we moved in two years ago our neighbor two houses up had a huge pine tree crash into their roof. It broke the main beam and went all the way down in their main bedroom. And it was not even super bad weather just windy. My house is completely clear of big trees and in a stormy night I sleep better.
Removing trees after you move in is of course an option but also very costly and can bring other problems i.e. permits, neighbors.
I'd say keep looking although I know it is hard and stressful. Did I mentioned that I looked at at least 60 houses...
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Old 10-20-2009, 09:09 PM
 
270 posts, read 1,252,181 times
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Default Old town

Quote:
Originally Posted by brightdoglover View Post
P.S. I suspect you are from the South or West. "Very old neighborhoods" are not from "the '60s" unless you mean the 1860s. Or 1760s!
This made me laugh and I hope the OP is not too offended. I am from Germany and my hometown just had its 1000 year anniversary. Talk about an old neighborhood.
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Old 10-20-2009, 09:46 PM
 
82 posts, read 213,986 times
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brightdoglover,
Thanks for your inputs. I meant 1960s as older neighborhood in comparison to what we have been looking for until recently. We had plans to get something built after 1990. But I just cant find most of them appealing. Mostly because there are a bunch of other houses looking exactly same in the same neighborhood.
Back to trees.. There are no pine trees. I think it is an oak tree. I was told that if a tree is closer to the house it costs upto 1000$ to have them removed safely otherwise it is usually less than 100$.
Also there is a large swimming pool which I think may not get enough sunlight.
Most of the houses in that neighborhood had bunches of trees and when it was 3.30 pm it seemed like sun was going behind those trees already.
So you mean this whole tree factor and lower direct light in the house wont effect resale?
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Old 10-20-2009, 10:01 PM
 
82 posts, read 213,986 times
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haberstroh,
Thanks for your note. Of course I am not offended by what brightdoglover said.

I do agree it is stressful at times to keep looking for houses. This will be our first house and we are very careful not to pick something wrong.
When you look at school district, neighborhood, location, age of the house, ect ect.. it seems like light in the house is less of a factor. This thread was to see if anyone really thought if that was a major problem.
People may look at us as "those tree haters" in that neighborhood where most of the houses seemed to be in shade.
I heard that we didn't need any permit to cut trees in our yard. What kind of permit did you say we needed?
We have decided to keep looking although my heart is bit broken that all my dreams of relaxing in a hammock in that private back yard is shattered
I think I just cant get past the low light factor.
Also did I mention that kitchen needed updates.
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Old 10-21-2009, 07:45 AM
 
Location: Houston TX
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The home I currently live in has zero tall trees. I am located in Houston and we lost all our trees a few years ago to Hurricane Rita. I miss them.

Sure we have a couple orange trees and a stunted pear, but one thing I look forward to in Massachusetts are the trees.

If you really think that you're not getting enough light in the kitchen, stop and think for a minute about the colors used in the room as well as the window situation. Also, I highly recommend installing skylights. They are a great way to bring unobstructed light into a room.

Last edited by ThinkingThinking; 10-21-2009 at 07:57 AM..
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Old 10-21-2009, 07:57 AM
 
Location: Back in the gym...Yo Adrian!
9,411 posts, read 18,843,960 times
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I wouldn't want trees too close to my home. Many of them are very old and brittle, and it doesn't take much to knock down some big branches and do some serious damage to your home, car, or worst case, you or a family member gets hurt or killed.

As to the sunlight in winter, once the leaves fall off the trees, they won't block the sun as much, unless of course they are pine trees.
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Old 10-21-2009, 10:33 AM
 
Location: Boston, MA
13,243 posts, read 9,349,913 times
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Several other issues about trees around the house are that:

-they do not let sunshine in to dry the exterior of the house after rain. If the house stays moist because of not enough sunshine you will get rotten siding, sills, and just about anything else made of wood.
You will also get mold. Mold will hold moisture onto the house as well as discoloring it and adding more rot.

-Trees too close to the house will provide a freeway for wildlife to your roof where the Eastern Grey Squirrel will make a home in your eves. You do not want this!

-The leaves of trees also clog up gutters and downspouts which prevents water from moving out and away from the home.

-If a tree touches the home, wind will cause the tree to rub the home and will cause damage over the long term.

In short, keep trees at least 50 feet away from your house and let a modicum of sunshine in.
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