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Old 05-17-2012, 12:14 AM
 
Location: Beautiful hills
248 posts, read 412,489 times
Reputation: 506

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Quote:
Originally Posted by DT113876 View Post
Ru Paul is a drag queen. A drag queen is a gay male that assumes a transgender, female persona for a variety of purposes (sometimes sexual, sometimes to entertain, sometimes for similar reasons to heterosexual crossdressers). Ru Paul however is not a transsexual and never claimed to. Basicly, he's not necessarily like you and doesn't claim to represent you, so please take into consideration Ru Paul is just as much a member and spokesperson for the LGBT community as you or anybody else.
Did I miss something?
While I admit that I think RuPaul looks gorgeous in drag, I don't understand why we're talking about him here
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Old 05-17-2012, 08:45 PM
 
Location: Purgatory
2,663 posts, read 4,682,575 times
Reputation: 3054
I have indifferent parents. I guess that's better? My mom's only response was "but you're a man". Priceless.
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Old 05-17-2012, 09:15 PM
 
Location: FL
1,727 posts, read 2,246,661 times
Reputation: 1047
I imagine indifferent can be painful too. Don't we all crave parents who are in our corner just loving us for being us? Unconditional love...I always thought that's what parents were supposed to give their children. As I child that's all I ever wanted. As a parent, it's what I've tried to give. I did find out as a parent that even when we love our children unconditionally, we still do have certain expectations and we do make mistakes, we do get angry and sometimes we do forget that we need to just let our children become who they are.
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Old 05-18-2012, 02:44 AM
 
Location: Gettysburg, PA
1,669 posts, read 1,712,687 times
Reputation: 3183
Quote:
Originally Posted by stepka View Post
I am often surprised when I hear that parents are surprised by this. It seems to me, and forgive me if I'm clueless, that your parents would have seen signs of your identifying with being a female from when you were a small child, as I assume that you did have those feelings from very young. Perhaps they were in denial though? It sound like your parents are very religious, and these things never go well with them.
Mine were surprised too when I told them, and I definitely was not overly-girly as a child; it actually came as quite a surprise to me that they had not considered my being transgender whatsoever [was quite terrified of telling them, so about a month before I went home to visit for the holidays had the "I have something to tell you" conversation over the phone--probably not the best way to go about it, but it was just how it happened. My brother and sister-in-law said (had about the same phone conversation with them as with my parents) they figured I was going to tell them I was a lesbian; my parents probably were thinking around the same lines, but then to not even have the gender thing cross their mind was quite a shock].


I was shocked and amazed and am still shocked and amazed at how supportive my family and few friends have been so far (I never had very many friends, always have been a loner). Even my then-fiance is very supportive. For about two years before I told him, we were living as "roommates" then without much in the way of intimate relations going on; now, over two years later, we still are much in the same relationship.

I don't identify completely at one end of the gender spectrum (I prefer genderqueer than transgender, though both don't seem to fit me quite right; though genderqueer definitely more than tg), maybe this has something to do with it, I don't know. While I present probably at least 70% of the time as a guy, I don't think the change is overwhelmingly drastic, and it has been occuring over two years so it has been very slow too. I don't know how I've been so fortunate, I am just grateful every day that I have such supportive loving people in my life.

Quote:
Originally Posted by fireandice1000 View Post
Speaking of weird, another thing I forgot to mention is that I'm sort of an anomaly in my generation. Unlike most people in Gen Y I tend to have a more tough-minded personality. I don't care about popularity; if I'm a loner for the rest of my life I don't really care. I'll admit that it can be a weakness; I've had more than my fair share of arguments. I don't go and cause trouble but I don't like being told what to do for the most part. I tend to have a more individualist personality overall. Yes, I've been pushed off blogs for refusing to play along, I'll admit that. It's also possible that I might have a touch of autism or Aspergers since I've heard where people who don't have a sexual orientation possibly have one of them.
I'm definitely an anomaly in my generation. You know I've always identified slightly more with the X generation, and (unless I'm calculating wrong) I'm only around two years older than you ('80--you mentioned you were 20 in 2002, I was 22. I always liked how I was born on a year that was a multiple of ten since its so easy to know how old I was at any year); I never found out where the cut-off is. The Ys are way too technologically-oriented for me; I've honestly always felt I belonged to the generation that was about 180 to 140 years ago, but who knows.
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Old 06-10-2012, 12:06 AM
 
Location: On the edge of the universe
994 posts, read 1,398,714 times
Reputation: 1427
Quote:
Originally Posted by Basiliximab View Post
Mine were surprised too when I told them, and I definitely was not overly-girly as a child; it actually came as quite a surprise to me that they had not considered my being transgender whatsoever [was quite terrified of telling them, so about a month before I went home to visit for the holidays had the "I have something to tell you" conversation over the phone--probably not the best way to go about it, but it was just how it happened. My brother and sister-in-law said (had about the same phone conversation with them as with my parents) they figured I was going to tell them I was a lesbian; my parents probably were thinking around the same lines, but then to not even have the gender thing cross their mind was quite a shock].


I was shocked and amazed and am still shocked and amazed at how supportive my family and few friends have been so far (I never had very many friends, always have been a loner). Even my then-fiance is very supportive. For about two years before I told him, we were living as "roommates" then without much in the way of intimate relations going on; now, over two years later, we still are much in the same relationship.

I don't identify completely at one end of the gender spectrum (I prefer genderqueer than transgender, though both don't seem to fit me quite right; though genderqueer definitely more than tg), maybe this has something to do with it, I don't know. While I present probably at least 70% of the time as a guy, I don't think the change is overwhelmingly drastic, and it has been occuring over two years so it has been very slow too. I don't know how I've been so fortunate, I am just grateful every day that I have such supportive loving people in my life.



I'm definitely an anomaly in my generation. You know I've always identified slightly more with the X generation, and (unless I'm calculating wrong) I'm only around two years older than you ('80--you mentioned you were 20 in 2002, I was 22. I always liked how I was born on a year that was a multiple of ten since its so easy to know how old I was at any year); I never found out where the cut-off is. The Ys are way too technologically-oriented for me; I've honestly always felt I belonged to the generation that was about 180 to 140 years ago, but who knows.
I know that feeling, LOL. I'd like to think I am unlike any other Gen Y'er in the world but who knows? I tend to be a drifter; I'm too used to being a loner.
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