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Old 07-10-2012, 01:55 PM
 
Location: SW Missouri
15,849 posts, read 31,236,695 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AnywhereElse View Post
I was talking to a neighbor up the street and she told me that her daughter had tried to commit suicide or anyway took 4 of her Prozac and 20 aspirins and now is "away" and going to undergo electro-shock therapy. I was horrified as I thought those days were over. I did read some info on the internet but still could not believe that is still done. I am concerned for this young lady because the place where she is, I think no one should be there. I talked with her once and she confided she had been diagnosed as bi-polar/depression. Does anyone know if this is a usual treatment? I wonder if they can force you to take it especially if you are trying to get your kids out of foster care. Probably.
My aunt on my father's side and an uncle on my mother's side both had it during the late 1950s or early 1960s I believe. I think it's better than drugging people into a zombie-like state with meds. I figure it's like pushing the reset button on an electrical device.

20yrsinBranson
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Old 07-10-2012, 07:19 PM
 
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I had a form of electro-therapy done to me when I was 13 and I still get flashbacks from it today.
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Old 07-10-2012, 07:45 PM
 
9,970 posts, read 16,602,627 times
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My ds was temporarily in state custody. We signed a blanket consent to treat form. I was concerned they would try EST, but he was sent home before that was mentioned as an option. Thank goodness---our insurance ran out! We have private insurance, if we had medicaid, I don't know, perhaps there's no limit to their coverage?

BTW, they "conned" my ds into placement, treatments, etc. They made him believe the state could offer him a better home, got him on pills he became addicted to. suicide is listed as a black-box warning, however, they just kept stuffing him with more and more of those pills. While on those pills, he attempted suicide 6x. Each time, they gave him more, and accused US of maltreatment, causing the suicidal tendencies. They simply ignored the fact that he never was suicidal before he began taking all that stuff. We pointed out the black box warnings, the answer was "oh, all those drugs carry that warning" duh, so, by their estimation, sinca all those drugs carry that warning, they are all equal, meaning WE his parents must be doing something to him. Where's the logic in that? Believe me, the inmates are running the asylum
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Old 07-11-2012, 04:42 AM
 
Location: Cartersville, GA
1,256 posts, read 3,073,556 times
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Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) can be a very effective treatment for depression. It has always been used an an alternate treatment, when medication has not been effective. As more effective antidepressants became available (e.g. the SSRIs, starting with Prozac,) the need for ECT has dwindled. It is available, but the demand is low, and there are not many facilities that perform the procedure nowadays.

If a physician is recommending ECT because antidepressant medication cannot stop her suicidal ideations, it may be a good idea. If the medication route has not been tried, it may be a good idea to get a second opinion.
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Old 07-11-2012, 10:26 PM
 
4,043 posts, read 3,105,019 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AnywhereElse View Post
I was talking to a neighbor up the street and she told me that her daughter had tried to commit suicide or anyway took 4 of her Prozac and 20 aspirins and now is "away" and going to undergo electro-shock therapy. I was horrified as I thought those days were over. I did read some info on the internet but still could not believe that is still done. I am concerned for this young lady because the place where she is, I think no one should be there. I talked with her once and she confided she had been diagnosed as bi-polar/depression. Does anyone know if this is a usual treatment? I wonder if they can force you to take it especially if you are trying to get your kids out of foster care. Probably.

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Old 07-15-2012, 09:36 PM
 
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My SIL and niece had this done and I also had big reservations about it. Still do. I visited them both after the procedure and both acted like zombies for a few days. My SIL said it helped her but she has a lot of problems so its hard to tell.
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Old 07-15-2012, 10:24 PM
 
4,761 posts, read 11,712,503 times
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I think this would be similar to plugging a wire into an outlet, then holding that wire to the internal circuit board of a computer or other electronic device. No telling what it will alter, damage, or erase!

Medical science is not quite as advanced as we might think sometimes.

Maybe someday they will be able to refine this so it can delete a specific area of a person's memory or alter specific portions of the brain?

But for now I guess that is all they have as a last resort for some cases. And hopefully this is used ONLY as a last resort.
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Old 07-16-2012, 08:08 AM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
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The idea that ECT is something out of the dark ages is...well, an idea that's out of the dark ages. As someone said, it's not like One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest for god's sake. You aren't held down on a table while they zap you. C'mon.

It's not used lightly--generally only in cases of severe depression to the point of being suicidal. And as someone else pointed out, they aren't sure how it works. One doctor likened it to hitting a staticky radio to reset it. It somehow "resets" the brain. There are side effects, like loss of short-term memory.
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Old 07-17-2012, 03:04 PM
 
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I've seen ECT change lives for the better. In some cases, it is the ONLY thing that can get a person out of a deep, deep depression. I worked in a psychiatric outpatient clinic for years, and we did not have ECT, but a local psych hospital did. I had 3 clients who swore by it, and actually had to fight with their insurance companies (I helped) to get the ECT approved. Just calling it "electro-shock therapy" shows that a person knows nothing about it, except what they've seen in old movies. Here is my one former client's story:

This lady in her 50s had such severe depression, and she had tried nearly every antidepressant out there, plus other meds to augment the antidepressants. She even tried clinical trials of experimental meds. She was deeply depressed, affectively, cognitively, and physically. She was literally too depressed to kill herself, as she could not even summon the energy or desire to attempt suicide, but had no will to live. She recalled how years ago in a hospital in the 70s, she had been given ECT and it "snapped" her out of a depression lasting several years. She begged the psychiatrist and me to help her get it again. We jumped through hoops--wrote comprehensive reports on every single med she tried and the results, got old hospital records from 25 years prior showing how it had helped her. Appealed and appealed to higher and higher levels, and finally got her insurance/managed care company to approve it. She went for a series of treatments, and eventually came completely out of the depression. She then was able to go back once or twice a year for what she called a "tune-up." She would fall into mild depression once in a while, but she continued to function really well, and actually cared about life again. At some point, she got so good at negotiating with her insurance company, that they started paying for her transportation to and from the ECT sessions. Some years later, she died of lung disease (ECT could not cure her of smoking it seems). She knew she was dying, and accepted it, but would still come in to her clinic appointments in good spirits. She worked on "getting her affairs in order" and preparing her adult children for her death. She would tell us over and over how grateful she was to have gotten the ECT, to be free of the debilitating depression in the last years of her life (I think it was like 6-7 years).

I found her to be really inspiring (my eyes just teared up now thinking about her). What I learned from fighting to get her ECT covered let me use that knowledge and experience to help the other two get theirs covered. They also had really great results. It may not be for everybody, but for some people, it's the only thing that helps.

So please, don't believe the old movies---ECT is not forced on people, it's not used as a punishment, and it's usually a last-resort that a person has to really, really want. The only side effects my 3 clients experienced were some mild memory lapses. And they all felt that was a small price to pay for getting their lives back. Our brains run on electricity and chemicals. Sometimes those chemicals and electrochemical processes get screwed up. So it's not as "unnatural" as some believe to put a little extra electricity into designated areas of the brain for very small periods of time. We put chemicals into our bodies every day that flow to our brain and can be much more damaging.
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Old 07-17-2012, 03:10 PM
 
14,245 posts, read 26,677,037 times
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I think that taking medications works with the chemistry, and ECT works with the electricity. It is hardly "Dark Ages," since there was, well, no electricity then, and people were beaten to get rid of the devils causing their illness, right?

ECT is unusually effective on older people with severe depression. There is some thinking now that it is a first-line treatment for many people with depression/suicidality, and is much more nuanced than ever before. (Please, forget about any movies with Jack Nicholson and also skip that scene in "The Bell Jar" or "A Beautiful Mind" or any scenes from the 1950s or so).

It has also shown to be effective in some neurological disorders, like Pick's Disease. I wouldn't have believed it if I hadn't seen it.

I have not heard of it being used on people under 18.
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