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View Poll Results: Is it wrong to not help a suicidal person?
Yes 6 19.35%
No 9 29.03%
Depends (please explain) 12 38.71%
Yes (unless it's for the terminally ill) 4 12.90%
Voters: 31. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 08-16-2012, 08:04 PM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
5,302 posts, read 6,602,687 times
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Yes, if someone comes to you in person or by phone or internet and says they are going to commit suicide, then I say you have a moral obligation to try to help that person. Even if all you do is call 911, you're still doing something. I couldn't live with myself if a friend said they were going to do it and I did nothing and they later died.

Not everyone who wants to commit suicide is a drama queen or a loser. Many of these people are in deep, deep pain. What these people need is treatment, and someone to listen to them.
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Old 08-16-2012, 08:46 PM
 
Location: where people are either too stupid to leave or too stuck to move
3,986 posts, read 5,909,226 times
Reputation: 3645
It depends, some people's problems are only temporary and if they stick around long enough they might be able get out of their situation..and some people's lives suck so horribly, death is their only way out of it.
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Old 08-17-2012, 03:48 AM
 
3,965 posts, read 4,764,684 times
Reputation: 3659
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sundance View Post
I gather no one is your family has committed suicide?
Yes, it was a friend from my days in France and I passed on the opportunity to "help" him. He was from my point of view of sound mind at least. I talked to him and he never reached out to anyone from what I could see. I reached out to him and wanted to know what was going on. He had a rough go for years (even rougher than me). He simply had enough and I told him that if that's what he needs to achieve peace then I wouldn't begrudge him for it. He died a couple of days later. I feel no remorse and if I talked to him over again then I would say the same thing.
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Old 08-17-2012, 05:23 AM
 
13,515 posts, read 14,947,569 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yellow Jacket View Post
What I mean is that I believe that everyone has a right to die. I also believe that everyone has a right to have peace if it only concerns one's self. Suicide is at the end of the day only terminating your own life. Why should I convince someone not to take an option that would give them what they want just because I would miss them? I think that's odd on my part. I bet my view is in the minority. It may be considered unethical because it goes against the grain for the "normal" man but I don't think it's wrong. I've added a poll to help organize the opinions. I don't think anyone has to remain alive for the sake of anyone else.
I comes down to what the reason for wanting to commit suicide is.

A person suffering from depression but not incurable illness I would certainly discourage, and try to steer toward professional help.

A person who has an incurable illness, or one who is in the a termal decline, I would not discourage. Though I would hope, and seek to find out, if they had emotional support for their decision, as well as whether they had considered the act thoroughly so they did not do something painful to themselves.

I don't live in anyone else's body, I do not experience their pain. I cannot judge what suffering is unendurable for someone else.
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Old 08-17-2012, 06:27 AM
 
18,847 posts, read 32,746,787 times
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One of the top reasons for suicide is access to guns. And familiarity with guns. Which is why many military and police officers are a high risk group. There are other causes, I have a not politically correct opinion, which I keep to myself, is that folks who gravitate towards those fields have issues already. And being exposed to stress, with low pay, is part of the problem as well.

Sometimes these people reach out, and those folks can be helped with cognitive behavorial therapy. There is validity, that CBT can help suicidal people change their thought patterns.
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Old 08-17-2012, 08:24 AM
 
4,750 posts, read 5,046,723 times
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As another poster said, there are a lot of drama seekers out there. I work on an inpatient psych unit and when I admit someone who took 5 Motrin because their boyfriend left them, that is drama. But then, I admit someone who has taken 100+ Tylenol, ends up on ICU, has the transplant team considering a liver transplant.... then I REALLY take notice. That person was serious.

I personally, don't feel any need to convince someone to live or die. I just listen.
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Old 08-17-2012, 08:35 AM
 
Location: Kansas
19,184 posts, read 15,745,417 times
Reputation: 18313
Can you really "help" a suicidal person? Maybe steer them in the right direction either to emergency care or therapy but I don't think anyone should feel that they should take the burden of that person and consider themselves responsible in any way if the person does commit suicide or not. That should not be the burden of another. Let's face it, sometimes people cry "wolf" too many times and are not taken seriously, I'm guessing we would term that "drama queen". Everyone has their own burdens to deal with also. I say the only help you can give someone that is serious about suicide is encouraging them to seek help, emergency help.

Do we really understand suicide? I know a lot of people use it as a threat "I'll kill myself if..........." and that is a bluff and if not, that threatening person is using it for control.

I think our biggest responsibility when it comes to suicide is when it is dealing with children and their cry for help. I can't believe how a child will commit suicide and has been talking about it on their blog or social network yet no one thought it was serious. I do think the most help can be extended to children and teens.

Have people become desensitized to suicide? A "Yeah, whatever."
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Old 08-17-2012, 05:54 PM
Status: "Disoriented" (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
61,020 posts, read 58,283,853 times
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I work for a public transportation agency that has, among other facilities, a few bridges that people like to leap from on as their chosen method of death. Every other month or so, someone manages to talk someone down, usually a cop. Of course, rarely do we hear if the person was sucessfully treated subsequent to their suicide attempt. If I saw someone on a bridge, I believe I would feel obligated to talk them down.

Also, I take a train to work, and at every train station there are signs posted with depression/suicide hotline numbers because so many people use the trains to kill themselves. That's tougher, because usually no one sees such a person until they leap in the train's path.
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Old 08-17-2012, 05:59 PM
Status: "Disoriented" (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
61,020 posts, read 58,283,853 times
Reputation: 73057
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnywhereElse View Post
Can you really "help" a suicidal person? Maybe steer them in the right direction either to emergency care or therapy but I don't think anyone should feel that they should take the burden of that person and consider themselves responsible in any way if the person does commit suicide or not. That should not be the burden of another. Let's face it, sometimes people cry "wolf" too many times and are not taken seriously, I'm guessing we would term that "drama queen". Everyone has their own burdens to deal with also. I say the only help you can give someone that is serious about suicide is encouraging them to seek help, emergency help.

Do we really understand suicide? I know a lot of people use it as a threat "I'll kill myself if..........." and that is a bluff and if not, that threatening person is using it for control.

I think our biggest responsibility when it comes to suicide is when it is dealing with children and their cry for help. I can't believe how a child will commit suicide and has been talking about it on their blog or social network yet no one thought it was serious. I do think the most help can be extended to children and teens.

Have people become desensitized to suicide? A "Yeah, whatever."
It's even scarier when a teenager kills himself or herself and no one saw it coming. There was a case in my area a few years ago when a popular kid killed himself by jumping off the roof of the school around midnight. Only one person ever had any indication that he felt that way. She was sort of a "different" type of girl, not in his usual crowd, but they had become friends and he confided in her. He'd texted her shortly before he committed suicide to say goodbye and that he was going to do it, but she was asleep and didn't see it until the next morning. When the adults questioned her for a clue as to why he did it, she said, "You know how people hate their hair or their legs or whatever? Well 'Joe' hated every single thing about himself." His peers and all the adults in his life were shocked, because he never showed any sign of being anything other than a happy, popular, well-adjusted teenager.
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Old 08-17-2012, 06:33 PM
 
Location: Lehigh Valley, PA
2,309 posts, read 3,721,046 times
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Most " suicidal " people are labeled as such because either directly or indirectly they have given clues and hints of issues that they are confronting.

There is a subset that do not disclose anything to anyone prior to their actual completed suicide.
This subset is rare whereas most do give off warning cues as to their intentions.

If someone has given suicide as much rational thought as possible given the situation and then completes said suicide then I would count this as a true case.

As others have stated here there are many that only use the term " suicide " as a tool in which to gain attention or to obtain help for underlying problems they are dealing with.

For these people there truly needs to be another classification other than suicidal.
The problem with this however is how do you truly know?

Personally I would not interfere with someones suicide if that person could come up with reasons I thought were valid.
Terminal illness, entire immediate family killed in accident, debilitating disease, loved one's suicide, impending prison sentence. person already incarcerated.

These are some examples that would allow me to understand and agree with that person's suicide.
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