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Old 09-23-2012, 05:01 AM
 
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I thought this article might interest some of you.

BBC News - A generation may be at higher risk of suicide - researchers
Quote:
A generation of UK men born in the 1960s and 1970s may be more likely to take their own lives because of attitudes around the role of men at the time, Samaritans researchers have said.
As I don't believe (though I may be wrong) that the Samaritans operates outside the UK i've put in this link to explain who they are. Just as a matter of interest my brother is a councellor for Samaritans in London: Samaritans | Samaritans
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Old 09-24-2012, 04:18 AM
 
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Yeah they are outside the UK, I used to do it
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Old 09-25-2012, 05:07 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rckgrl View Post
Yeah they are outside the UK, I used to do it
Never knew that, are they charity funded in the US too?
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Old 09-26-2012, 03:40 PM
 
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Do you think that part of the reason for a rise in suicides amoung 50's and up could be that when you lose your job at that age, it's pretty hard to find another when you're competing against all the younger, and stronger job seekers?
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Old 09-26-2012, 04:04 PM
 
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Originally Posted by purehuman View Post
Do you think that part of the reason for a rise in suicides amoung 50's and up could be that when you lose your job at that age, it's pretty hard to find another when you're competing against all the younger, and stronger job seekers?
Hmm.....

I'd say that for many at this age (I myself am 40) that the ending of anything that they perceive as important to what makes them what they are could be difficult to overcome. Whether it's employment, health, marriage or whatever, anything at all that ends that 'important' aspect of their lives. I would imagine that they may well feel that it's going to be much harder now to regain the part of their life that they've lost. If they themselves don't possess a positive attitude but lean towards a negative one then any adversity may seem insurmountable. Any enthusiasm they have for the new challenge diminishes faster than it might if they were younger and felt they had longer to be seen as being of value. If they feel unsupported by family or society it could be very easy to get depressed by what they may see as an impossible challenge.

This is all guesswork, i'm a long way from being an amateur psychiatrist.
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Old 09-27-2012, 02:00 PM
 
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makes sense Baldrick, but the same could be said for the younger...I don't agree with you when you say that "enthusiasm diminishes faster'..I'm not sure that older people view themselves as being of less value just because they're nearing retirement, personally I would consider these experienced workers to be of even MORE value . What new challenge could an older person face that the younger ones don't?...It's about jobs, far as I'm concerned, everyone I know who has a secure job, be they old or young (but especially the old) is basically content with life.....it's the constant fear of losing that job, that makes people unhappy, and when that "older" person DOES lose their job, to a less knowledgeable , but younger, quicker employee, that's when I believe thoughts of suicide could arise.

Last edited by purehuman; 09-27-2012 at 02:19 PM..
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Old 09-27-2012, 02:07 PM
 
5,660 posts, read 4,499,099 times
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Originally Posted by purehuman View Post
makes sense Baldrick, but the same could be said for the younger.
True, but I can only hit what i'm bowled.

Maybe it's the sense of stability that a 'more mature' individual sees disintergrating around them that could be a trigger leading to depression and thoughts of suicide. Maybe it's the view that things might improve when your young that keeps a spark of hope alive and the thought that your too old for things to improve that extinguishes hopes spark.
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Old 09-27-2012, 04:43 PM
 
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maybe....course I don't really believe that there's a rise in suicides of older people anyways...maybe the young.
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