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Old 10-27-2012, 03:16 PM
 
Location: The Conterminous United States
22,564 posts, read 48,436,929 times
Reputation: 13435

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Quote:
Originally Posted by fuzzymystic View Post
All the things that people are saying here, pay attention to it. As for your comment about being prepared to die from cancer as opposed to living with the anxiety? Obviously, you have never seen anyone dying from cancer from smoking. If you had, I don't think you would ever say that.
In desperation I went looking for some inspiration online. I found a video a son made of his mother dying of lung cancer. She wanted him to do it so that others would not have the same fate. It was incredibly powerful. At my lowest times I would remember that woman dying, of her trying to breathe, for grappling for breath and the urge to smoke would pass.
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Old 10-27-2012, 04:11 PM
 
12,983 posts, read 13,110,954 times
Reputation: 19671
Quote:
Originally Posted by hiknapster View Post
In desperation I went looking for some inspiration online. I found a video a son made of his mother dying of lung cancer. She wanted him to do it so that others would not have the same fate. It was incredibly powerful. At my lowest times I would remember that woman dying, of her trying to breathe, for grappling for breath and the urge to smoke would pass.
My sister and mother both died of lung cancer within a month of each, other five years ago. Until then, I never really thought about the pain associated with cancer. I quit a few months after my mother was diagnosed. My sister was diagnosed a few months after that. They lived in the same house, my sister and her family and my mother, and they had 2 different kinds of lung cancer. My sister died, then less than a month later, my mother did. My point is, you don't want to get cancer versus have a panic attack. With a panic attack, you only think you're going to die.

Last edited by fuzzymystic; 10-27-2012 at 05:06 PM..
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Old 10-27-2012, 04:27 PM
 
4,482 posts, read 8,243,656 times
Reputation: 6573
I don't understand why it's so hard for people to quit. When I decided to stop smoking, I just did. No rehab. No patch. No drug. I quit drinking and other stuff the same way. Just set your freaking mind to it and do it.
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Old 10-27-2012, 05:08 PM
 
12,983 posts, read 13,110,954 times
Reputation: 19671
^^ And I'm sure you were just a peach to be around, too. Just because you think you did it, no problem, no change in behavior, I imagine others around you might say differently. Anyway, some people have a harder time with addictions than others do. We are not all the same.
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Old 10-27-2012, 06:14 PM
 
10 posts, read 59,239 times
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Thanks heaps everyone for your replies and help. My breathing has now returned to normal - I was so terrified that i would never breath again - that was the first time in my life that has ever happened to me and an awful experience.

I have had a hell of a physical and emotional journey thru this - and i am thankful to say today that i feel ok. I dont feel like a mad psychotic crazy lunatic

I would never smoke again - so i too will now use N O P E - i could never go thru that again and i know if i had one smoke - it would lead to 5 to 10 to 30 to 60 to 1250 and id be wanting to quit again. I honestly dont know if id survive that a second time around. Id asked me to be placed in a patted room and for my own protection - be induced into a coma. lol
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Old 10-27-2012, 06:22 PM
 
Location: Tulsa, OK
2,449 posts, read 2,421,448 times
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My mother died from lung cancer (not a pleasant thing to watch...as she had one lung removed, and still smoked) My dad had COPD, my sister empheseyma (and she still smokes) I quit cold turkey 12 years ago, and never looked back. I never needed drugs, but trust me, its better to get over the initial withdrawl from the nicotine with them, and live a better life, then without them and go for the big C. Try to relax, and take it one minute at a time. YOU CAN DO IT!
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Old 10-27-2012, 07:01 PM
 
Location: SW Florida
4,616 posts, read 6,286,163 times
Reputation: 7824
I quit cold-turkey in 1987 from 1-1/2 packs a day. I just picked a date/time that I would quit (Fri. 10/16/87 at 4 PM), and smoked my brains out until that time. I literally was in nicotine withdrawal for about six weeks. I had incredible tiredness, felt like I was in a fog, had nasal congestion and all kinds of weird symptoms. I called in sick that Mon., which happened to be "Black Monday" (stock market crash of '87) and boy, was that appropriate for my mood -- I felt like the world was collapsing around me. I had smoked for 25 years! But with every passing day of feeling just as bad as the day before, I was more and more determined that I would never go back. I was never going to go through this h*** again. I had NO idea that nicotine was that insidious. In my opinion, people who do the patch and things of that nature are just postponing the inevitable. I had a friend who quit smoking but got hooked on Nicorette. Just try to get off everything. The Valium and other drugs are just complicating matters. Be strong and tell yourself, "This too WILL pass!". Good luck -- you can do it!
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Old 10-27-2012, 07:38 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic east coast
5,525 posts, read 10,231,738 times
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May I suggest yoga? It sure helped me when I quit. I learned to do deep breathing and how to stop an anxiety attack...it was just so very helpful. It's a non-prescription valium for me...and many others. Please consider it.
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Old 10-27-2012, 07:48 PM
 
Location: In a house
13,253 posts, read 37,879,151 times
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OP, it actually sounds like you have different things going on that aren't directly related to each other, but they became related, when you quit smoking and shifted to the e-cigarettes and then, when you quit those.

It sounds as though with your fibromyalgia and other problems, you were already set up for depression (remember depression often comes in tangent with fibromyalgia, AND body aches are symptoms of depression - the two ailments feed off each other).

It sounds as though when you switched to the e-cigarettes, you were expecting it to make it easy to quit, and that set you up for - not failure exactly, but a much more significant struggle than you realized you'd experience.

So then you quit entirely, cold turkey, and had a full-blown panic attack. Which of course got your "inner dialogue" cursing you up and down to the seventh pale of hell because you were stupid to quit in the first place (no, you weren't stupid, but the nicotine-addicted part of your brain was screaming that at you). So that put you into full-on rage mode, which of course sends synapses firing away like crazy, which releases hormones, which makes you mad, which blows a gasket in your head, which releases hormones, and so on and so forth.

MEANWHILE....you're still suffering from depression, and the joys of fibromyalgia

So your body and mind are both panicking, and you take meds.

The xanax, by the way, was too much. I don't know why you were told to take 1mg. That's a HUGE starting dose. The standard starting dose is only .25mg, with .5mg once you are able to function with the .25 (after a week or two). And you wouldn't take it 3x/day, you'd take it when you feel especially stressed and recognize that the stress might lead to an attack. Or, if you know you get panicky in specific situations (like just before supper, or when you're grocery shopping, or on your way to work, for example) you'd take one 10-20 minutes before that event.

Combining xanax with valium is dangerous, because they're similar drugs so you're basically double-dosing yourself. Plus you were taking 2-4x more of the xanax than you should've been prescribed to start out with, and you're looking at a potential overdose situation. PLUS combine that with nicotine withdrawal (which really only takes less than a week to get over)...

You basically psyched yourself up for a full-on freakout, which is exactly what happened. You've had a chance to calm down from it, and you can move forward from there. Don't obsess about smoking. If you start thinking about it, then let the thoughts come, and let them go again. They're just thoughts, they can't hurt you. If you want a smoke, you're allowed to WANT one. You just can't have one, and now that you're past your addiction, it's okay not to have one, AND it's okay to want one. Recognize the desire, and it'll go away all by itself.

I smoked for 30 years, and tried quitting a couple of times, but failed. I always said if they invented a pill that would make me forget I'm a smoker, I'd take it. And then Chantix came along. After hemming and hawing for a year or so, I finally broke down and told my doctor I was ready to give it a shot. A week later, and I stopped smoking entirely. A week after that I stopped taking the Chantix. I haven't had a smoke in 6 years, and I haven't missed it -at all-.

My husband smokes and it's disgusting. He can smoke in the basement, or outside. Not in the main house. When he first lights up, that -first- waft of lit cigarette smell - I actually like. But the stench of lingering smoke, or burnt cigarettes, on clothes, on skin, on breath, in the air - I can't stand it. I couldn't stand it when I was a smoker but I didn't know how to stop.

You'll get through the angst of it all, but you have to give yourself permission to experience whatever feelings you feel about smoking. It's been a serious habit, and serious habits are seriously hard to give up. The habit, for me, was harder than the addiction. I couldn't figure out what to do with my hand, I was so used to reaching for the pack of smokes, or a lighter, or the ashtray. I got over it. You will too. Find something to replace the habit, that won't become just as bad. So - no eating pretzels. No eating anything as a replacement for smoking. Don't use that method, because you'll start eating as often as you smoked, and you'll end up obese and unhealthy. Rub your fingertips together when you want a smoke. Or tap the back of your other hand in rhythm to a song in your head. Or roll a pencil between your fingers.

You'll get through it. Just be extra careful with those meds!

Last edited by AnonChick; 10-27-2012 at 07:51 PM.. Reason: I think it's been SIX years since I quit, not 4!
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Old 10-27-2012, 07:53 PM
 
10 posts, read 59,239 times
Reputation: 29
I lost my brother in law to cancer - followed by a sister in law - but the death that pushed me was my nephew of a drug overdose.

My 12 year old most precious boy lit a cigarette in response to this death. How do i tell my boy that drugs kill when i cant stop smoking - when i found out he was smoking - i told him to stop - whilst i sat on the verandah having a smoke - sheesh - i can not believe i allowed my own behavior.

Thats why i quit and thats why i stay quit.
The 1mg valium was awesome for the first couple of days after the panic attack, it really allowed me to calm down and get some sleep. This quit has been going on for so long for me now - i really was worn out and exhausted. The nicotine overdose was an awful experience.
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