U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Health and Wellness > Mental Health
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 11-14-2014, 05:48 PM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ
2,653 posts, read 2,104,548 times
Reputation: 2812

Advertisements

I'm experimenting with nicotine gum and dipping tobacco for about one month to see if it helps my depression. I didn't pull this idea out of thin air. There are studies being conducted to research this.

So far I've enjoyed the mild effects of nicotine. Mild euphoria, but it's short lived. I know this is playing with fire though. I've read that the gum is relatively harmless although nicotine is very addictive.

Another thing I've learned is that sometimes people with MDD improve with mild stimulants like Ritalin, etc.

Anyone else have experience with this?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 11-14-2014, 05:49 PM
 
Location: The #1 sunshine state, Arizona.
12,172 posts, read 15,917,569 times
Reputation: 64049
Switch to vaping.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-14-2014, 06:17 PM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ
2,653 posts, read 2,104,548 times
Reputation: 2812
Quote:
Originally Posted by ElizaTeal View Post
Switch to vaping.
As in electronic cigs?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-19-2014, 12:38 AM
 
Location: Purgatory
6,322 posts, read 5,073,209 times
Reputation: 9781
Yea, that is what vaping is.

I'm curious to know how you do w the nicotine.

I've used stimulants off label for MDD and they worked VERY WELL! I do NOT recommend Ritalin/Methylphenidate for this. Methylphenidate meds were the only one that ever gave me a "rebound depression" when they wore off.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-21-2014, 07:04 AM
 
5,697 posts, read 5,627,315 times
Reputation: 1939
Quote:
Originally Posted by DougStark View Post
I'm experimenting with nicotine gum and dipping tobacco for about one month to see if it helps my depression. I didn't pull this idea out of thin air. There are studies being conducted to research this.

So far I've enjoyed the mild effects of nicotine. Mild euphoria, but it's short lived. I know this is playing with fire though. I've read that the gum is relatively harmless although nicotine is very addictive.

Another thing I've learned is that sometimes people with MDD improve with mild stimulants like Ritalin, etc.

Anyone else have experience with this?


I was a chain smoker for 30 years
also have clinical depression if nicotine helped with depression I would have known it
good grief
listen to what you are saying!!!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-26-2014, 03:32 AM
 
Location: Purgatory
6,322 posts, read 5,073,209 times
Reputation: 9781
Quote:
Originally Posted by georgia dem View Post
I was a chain smoker for 30 years
also have clinical depression if nicotine helped with depression I would have known it
good grief
listen to what you are saying!!!
You might not have known, if that was your baseline for 30 years. Nicotine is a stimulant. Stimulants are sometimes prescribed in chronic depression- usually close to the last resort. This is not as far fetched as you think.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-26-2014, 06:07 AM
 
1,490 posts, read 1,021,318 times
Reputation: 666
Quote:
Originally Posted by georgia dem View Post
I was a chain smoker for 30 years
also have clinical depression if nicotine helped with depression I would have known it
good grief
listen to what you are saying!!!
Maybe the nicotine is why you are still here & haven't done anything more harmful to yourself?

OP...I certainly don't know it to be true, and would caution against becoming addicted to something like nicotine. Its an addiction that is not easy to get over & obviously has terrible & harmful effects if you were to pick up smoking. And I'm not a doctor or a formal expert in any of these things to suggest anybody should put any significant weight to my thoughts.

Having put the caveats out there, I'll tell you my experience as a smoker for 20+ years with self-diagnosed BPD (the high functioning flavor). The addiction to nicotine (for me) is not the most difficult part of giving up smoking for me. It is the feeling & relief (albeit temporary) from the black hole of depressive mental state. I have quit for months before, and can go for days without on occasion without smoking/nicotine and while I can feel the effects of withdrawal, I know that to be something I can overcome with willpower & distraction (which I cannot always do with a depressive mental state as easily).

Some would argue the chicken or egg problem; that quitting an addiction is leading to the depressive state. While I can't say with 100% certainty for every person on the planet, I believe the overwhelming majority of people in the past 10-15 years that have quit nicotine successfully is enough anecdotal evidence to suggest that those who cannot/have not quit simply are getting something out of it that is beyond the norm.

So I guess thats a long winded way of saying that I think the question has merit, and may be a worthwhile experimentation for one that has severe & conventionally untreatable depressive episodes. But caution that trading one issue for two issues is not something anybody wants to do.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-26-2014, 08:03 PM
 
5,697 posts, read 5,627,315 times
Reputation: 1939
Quote:
Originally Posted by MartinEden99 View Post
Maybe the nicotine is why you are still here & haven't done anything more harmful to yourself?

OP...I certainly don't know it to be true, and would caution against becoming addicted to something like nicotine. Its an addiction that is not easy to get over & obviously has terrible & harmful effects if you were to pick up smoking. And I'm not a doctor or a formal expert in any of these things to suggest anybody should put any significant weight to my thoughts.

Having put the caveats out there, I'll tell you my experience as a smoker for 20+ years with self-diagnosed BPD (the high functioning flavor). The addiction to nicotine (for me) is not the most difficult part of giving up smoking for me. It is the feeling & relief (albeit temporary) from the black hole of depressive mental state. I have quit for months before, and can go for days without on occasion without smoking/nicotine and while I can feel the effects of withdrawal, I know that to be something I can overcome with willpower & distraction (which I cannot always do with a depressive mental state as easily).

Some would argue the chicken or egg problem; that quitting an addiction is leading to the depressive state. While I can't say with 100% certainty for every person on the planet, I believe the overwhelming majority of people in the past 10-15 years that have quit nicotine successfully is enough anecdotal evidence to suggest that those who cannot/have not quit simply are getting something out of it that is beyond the norm.

So I guess thats a long winded way of saying that I think the question has merit, and may be a worthwhile experimentation for one that has severe & conventionally untreatable depressive episodes. But caution that trading one issue for two issues is not something anybody wants to do.


I also have clinical depression no the nicotine did nothing but keep me addicted for 30 years
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-26-2014, 08:17 PM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ
2,653 posts, read 2,104,548 times
Reputation: 2812
thanks for the thoughtful responses, people. I must say, I do enjoy packing my lip daily now- I like the mild buzz I get from it. But I don't plan on buying anymore tins of the stuff. I don't want to risk oral cancer or losing my teeth/gums...

My alternative is to stick with the nicotine gum, although it's considerably more expensive than snuff. Seems I just need something to look forward to, esp. when I don't feel good. Booze doesn't give me a buzz at all (unlike when I was in my 20s and 30s.) I enjoy benzos when I can get my hands on some, but doctors are very reluctant to prescribe them to me. Weed doesn't do anything for me either. I know it's all a brain chemistry/neurotransmitter thing. I wish I had my young, healthy brain back
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-29-2015, 11:08 AM
 
1,100 posts, read 988,000 times
Reputation: 3082
Default Me too!

Quote:
Originally Posted by DougStark View Post
I'm experimenting with nicotine gum and dipping tobacco for about one month to see if it helps my depression. I didn't pull this idea out of thin air. There are studies being conducted to research this.

So far I've enjoyed the mild effects of nicotine. Mild euphoria, but it's short lived. I know this is playing with fire though. I've read that the gum is relatively harmless although nicotine is very addictive.

Another thing I've learned is that sometimes people with MDD improve with mild stimulants like Ritalin, etc.

Anyone else have experience with this?
I have to start by saying I have never smoked tobacco -- never even wanted to. I don't like the smell, the messy dirty ashtrays, the expense and the threat of addiction.

BUT: as I get older, I've been noticing a significant loss of concentration ability and a certain depression symptoms like sleeping too much, weight gain, and lack of motivation. I used Zoloft and Paxil for a while many years ago, but I really didn't like some of the side effects. I looked at some of the recent research that says smokers may be using the nicotine in cigarettes to alleviate depression, and that nicotine alone (without the acetaldehyde in cigarette smoke) is not particularly addictive.

So two weeks ago I bought a package of 2 mg nicotine gum and started chewing a couple of them a day. The most concrete result is lightheadedness for a while after I chew a piece of gum. I seem to have a slightly reduced appetite, especially for candy and other sugary food, and more willingness to return to some of my hobbies and do more work around the house. I don't notice a craving for the nicotine, and there have been many days that I don't even think about it and don't use the gum. I'm considering seeing whether the 4 mg variety provides a greater effect.

I'd be interested in comments from others who've tried this.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Health and Wellness > Mental Health
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:35 PM.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top