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Old 01-18-2015, 08:01 AM
 
5 posts, read 4,237 times
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Hello. About eight years ago right after finishing graduate school I had a traumatic incident (I prefer not to go into details). While I recovered my career was put on hold. During this time a lot of people I thought of as friends disappeared and I was mostly alone. Seeing this, my uncle gave me a Rhodesian Ridgeback puppy (named Nero). Having Nero during the last six years contributed significantly to my emotional and psychological recovery. I would even say my physical recovery as well, since I took him out for daily exercise once able.

Now I have recovered enough to where I can join the workforce, and have been looking. My opportunities are limited because I do not have the work experience of my peers, but I am receiving some response and I am hopeful to get something soon. The problem is Nero. Or rather, the problem is finding housing that will accept a 100 pound Rhodesian Ridgeback in the cities where I will most likely end up getting a job (where I am at now the job market is not very strong for my field). No one in my family can take him, nor do I want them to. To me he and I are a package deal. My parents and siblings are pressuring me to "get rid of him" because he places so many restrictions on my ability to accept a job. I know this, but cannot stomach even the idea of it. It seems so callous to have the attitude "thanks for being there for me when no one else was, but you need to go away now that your usefulness has expired." My dad thinks I am nuts for this even being a difficult decision for me. To him reestablishing my career should come first, no question. Has anyone ever been a similar situation or anything close? If so, what did you do? How did you decide? Thank you.
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Old 01-18-2015, 07:26 PM
 
Location: TOVCCA
8,452 posts, read 12,276,711 times
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Renting a room in a house with a tolerant owner is an option. Don't give him up.
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Old 01-19-2015, 02:01 AM
 
5,239 posts, read 7,021,520 times
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When you line up a potential job, check out the Rhodesian Ridgeback rescues, they will be sympathetic and maybe able to help you find some place to rent that will take your dog. I understand how you feel about your pet, they are much more loyal than people. I admire you caring so much about Nero. All too many think of only themselves in this world and seem to believe pets are like disposable inanimate objects that can be discarded when they lose interest or move. Best of luck to you.

Ridgeback.org

Contact Us - Rhodesian Ridgeback Rescue, Inc.
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Old 01-19-2015, 08:38 AM
 
839 posts, read 1,109,894 times
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I wouldn't think it would be that hard finding a place to live that accepts dogs. What's wrong with finding a place on the outskirts of the city where it might be easier?

I would definitely not get rid of him. I think guilt would eat you alive.
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Old 01-19-2015, 08:57 AM
 
Location: Kirkwood, DE and beautiful SXM!
12,054 posts, read 20,877,392 times
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Don't get rid of Nero~~you both need each other and you will be miserable without him. If you are miserable, you cannot do a good job at work.

There are probably quite a few apartment complexes that will accept pets and many homes for rent also accept pets. Just make sure that you have renters insurance lined up (not sure if any cover damage done by a pet) and can show a potential landlord that you are prepared to accept personal responsibility for any damage that Nero may do. You will also have to pay a pet deposit.

Also, line up a pet sitter to get Nero out during the day or find a doggie daycare. If you can find a place to live near your job, you could get home to let him out during the day. If the two of you have been together 24/7 for quite a while, he may have some separation anxiety so be prepared.

After the sale of my home and before moving into my present home, I rented a home with a 100 pound dog and 4 cats. Landlord did not care as long as the rent was paid. Here in Delaware, almost every apartment complex advertises that they accept pets.

Good luck but don't give up on Nero. Great suggestion about having a rescue help in the housing situation. Good luck.
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Old 01-19-2015, 09:14 AM
 
Location: Squirrel Hill PA
2,113 posts, read 2,044,055 times
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Keep your dog. If you make it up in your head that your dog goes where you go you will find a place for you both. Even in the city. Many landlords, at least in my area, are becoming more open to pets. I had a similar issue when I was getting ready to move to the city upon getting my current job. The answer for me was an apartment in a house that had been turned int a three apartment rental unit. All of the tenants have dogs and the neighborhood we live in is very dog friendly. You just have to get to know where to look depending on the city you wind up getting a job in. Luckily when it comes to that information City Data is a valuable resource.
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Old 01-19-2015, 09:26 AM
 
10,423 posts, read 13,841,406 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CLDAHDC View Post
Or rather, the problem is finding housing that will accept a 100 pound Rhodesian Ridgeback in the cities where I will most likely end up getting a job (where I am at now the job market is not very strong for my field).
Read up on the Fair Housing Act and how it relates to "Emotional Support Animals". If a health professional determines the animal is necessary for your ability to live in the rental and return to the work force, the landlord may have to be willing to accommodate the animal or face sanctions. Note: do not confuse the Americans with Disability Act (ADA) with FHAct as they are not the same and ADA usually does not apply to you living in a private rental unit. If you have any questions, you can post them on the Rental sub forum on CD and many can guide you through the steps.
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Old 01-19-2015, 09:56 AM
 
460 posts, read 765,322 times
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When I was younger, late 20's, I was in a similar situation. I got a job offer in San Francisco, and it was extremely difficult to try to find housing that would take my dog. So I put him up for adoption, and it messed me up for 10 years. I remember to this day the look on his face when he could tell I was leaving him. I have another dog now, and I would rather be homeless and live in my car than to give up my dog. Because you talk about a fragile emotional state and how your dog was there helping you through it, I would consider what giving up your dog could do for your wellbeing.
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Old 01-21-2015, 04:42 PM
 
5,697 posts, read 5,627,315 times
Reputation: 1939
keep your dog!!
you have been given a lot of solutions
don't let that baby go
he will not understand and it is high risk giving up a dog
sadly they end up in high kill shelters
please please keep Nero
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Old 01-21-2015, 04:48 PM
Status: "The lesser of two evils is still evil." (set 23 days ago)
 
Location: City Data Land
16,283 posts, read 9,646,540 times
Reputation: 31688
Quote:
Originally Posted by rebellious1 View Post
I wouldn't think it would be that hard finding a place to live that accepts dogs. What's wrong with finding a place on the outskirts of the city where it might be easier?

I would definitely not get rid of him. I think guilt would eat you alive.
This. It's not as hard to find a place to rent than you might think, but it can also depend on where you live somewhat. I just moved out of my rent house. I own two Great Danes and they rented to me with only a $300 pet deposit. My landlords own 1500 rent houses throughout the US. When I was looking for a house to rent, I had several choices. This was just the house I liked the best. Don't give up on Nero or yourself. Good luck!
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