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Old 02-12-2015, 11:27 PM
 
Location: Cushing OK
14,545 posts, read 18,413,482 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Utopian Slums View Post
Maybe. Didn't work for me but I know I'm not the norm. If anything my cats greatly calm me down and help me sleep.

.
My cats snuggle and the dogs cuddle next to them. When I've been without them its hard to sleep. I think how they effect your sleep depends on your personal relationship with your critters. Nala curls up under my chin when I go to bed (she's kitten sized but full grown) and I relax right away. I wake up with them cuddled next to me and hate to get up its so perfectly peaceful.

The two who fight do not come in to join mom in sleep.
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Old 02-12-2015, 11:54 PM
 
Location: Cushing OK
14,545 posts, read 18,413,482 times
Reputation: 16831
Quote:
Originally Posted by katie45 View Post
There are 'day' people and 'night' people. Some of us do better when following our internal clock.

Not saying that the OP can adjust school/work accordingly; however, that could be an answer.
Being a night person, and retired, its usual to find me awake and on the computer or busy doing something when the late night talk shows end. I do most of my writing then. I not only work on stitching and other crafts stuff then, when everything is quiet and nobody is going to interrupt, but do the designs for it then too. Just don't expect me to be up before noon or maybe later. There is something deeply calming and which makes the good juices flow after dark, which is my prime time. In college, when I could arrainge classes when I wanted, I took as many as I could in the afternoon. I often did my homework over the night. The ones that didn't really matter to me I'd take during the early parts of the day.

I'm also one of those people who when I'm asleep, nothing wakes me up. Not even alarm clocks going off for an hour. I would also wake just enough to walk across the room and shut them off and go back to sleep. When I was working as a programmer, I had heavy fog problems in the morning since I lived near the beach, so they had me come in two hours later and stay two hours later when it was fog season. It worked well, but I was still in the blahs in morning hours. I kept the mind numbing stuff for then.

I suspect I'm on the extreme, but your orientation to being noctural or day person definately effects your ability to sleep and rest properly, as well as how hard or easy it is to do tasks. The best thing I ever did for myself was to listen. You can't always cater to your programming but as much as you can helps a lot.
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Old 02-13-2015, 12:16 AM
 
Location: State of Transition
84,022 posts, read 77,081,201 times
Reputation: 84803
Quote:
Originally Posted by tar21 View Post
I basically already do all that sleep hygiene stuff then, I was hoping there was more to it then that. I can do all that and lay in bed for hours still unable to sleep even with pills, is there anything else I can do? It's really affecting my ability to live a normal life.
Do you stay off the computer and TV at least 2 hours before bedtime? (Reading is best.) Avoid sweets after dinner? No alcohol in the evenings (it's a stimulant, contrary to popular belief)? Add those to your sleep hygiene regime, for good measure.

Are you in the US? If so, you should go to a holistic doctor or a naturopathic doctor, and get a full hormonal check up. This means: checking your adrenal hormones and getting an 18-hr. test (a saliva collection schedule) to check their circadian rhythm to see if you're producing too many stress hormones at the wrong time. It means checking your sleep hormones: progesterone, mainly (that's what puts you to sleep at night) and estrogen (that's what keeps you asleep through the night). It means checking to see if you have insulin resistance (hence my caution against eating sweets at night, or too many carbs at dinner). It might mean doing a urine collection protocol, to see if your neurotransmitters are out of balance, causing a deficiency in the calming ones that facilitate sleep and help you deal with stress and anxiety.

Are you in perimenopause or menopause? How old are you? If you have a hormone imbalance, sleep hygiene won't help you. If you're over 40, you may need to supplement with progesterone, especially at night. You can get over-the-counter low-dose progesterone cream at a health food store, or possibly Whole Foods.

Insurance-based doctors in the U.S. don't administer the adrenal hormone test, and most of them are pretty useless for this kind of problem. (That includes endocrinologists.) Sleep specialists are out to lunch. They don't work with hormonal issues at all, even though that's the cause of a large percentage of their patients' sleep problems. Unless you get really lucky, you'll have to look for doctors who don't take insurance, or for naturopathic doctors. This will cost you out-of-pocket, but a good MD or ND will get to the bottom of your problem. There may be some trial and error involved in finding a good doc.

How is your thyroid? Do you have thyroid disease? Thyroid disease can undermine sleep. Do you exercise at all, even just walking? If so, at what time of day? If not, get yourself a regular exercise program either in the morning, or around mid-day or early afternoon.

Last edited by Ruth4Truth; 02-13-2015 at 12:38 AM..
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Old 03-01-2015, 03:47 AM
 
696 posts, read 679,224 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
Do you stay off the computer and TV at least 2 hours before bedtime? (Reading is best.) Avoid sweets after dinner? No alcohol in the evenings (it's a stimulant, contrary to popular belief)? Add those to your sleep hygiene regime, for good measure.

Are you in the US? If so, you should go to a holistic doctor or a naturopathic doctor, and get a full hormonal check up. This means: checking your adrenal hormones and getting an 18-hr. test (a saliva collection schedule) to check their circadian rhythm to see if you're producing too many stress hormones at the wrong time. It means checking your sleep hormones: progesterone, mainly (that's what puts you to sleep at night) and estrogen (that's what keeps you asleep through the night). It means checking to see if you have insulin resistance (hence my caution against eating sweets at night, or too many carbs at dinner). It might mean doing a urine collection protocol, to see if your neurotransmitters are out of balance, causing a deficiency in the calming ones that facilitate sleep and help you deal with stress and anxiety.

Are you in perimenopause or menopause? How old are you? If you have a hormone imbalance, sleep hygiene won't help you. If you're over 40, you may need to supplement with progesterone, especially at night. You can get over-the-counter low-dose progesterone cream at a health food store, or possibly Whole Foods.

Insurance-based doctors in the U.S. don't administer the adrenal hormone test, and most of them are pretty useless for this kind of problem. (That includes endocrinologists.) Sleep specialists are out to lunch. They don't work with hormonal issues at all, even though that's the cause of a large percentage of their patients' sleep problems. Unless you get really lucky, you'll have to look for doctors who don't take insurance, or for naturopathic doctors. This will cost you out-of-pocket, but a good MD or ND will get to the bottom of your problem. There may be some trial and error involved in finding a good doc.

How is your thyroid? Do you have thyroid disease? Thyroid disease can undermine sleep. Do you exercise at all, even just walking? If so, at what time of day? If not, get yourself a regular exercise program either in the morning, or around mid-day or early afternoon.
I have tried reading before bed but find I can't put the book down and want to read it until the end, and end up staying up just as late as if I was on the computer.
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Old 03-01-2015, 10:29 AM
 
Location: Cushing OK
14,545 posts, read 18,413,482 times
Reputation: 16831
Quote:
Originally Posted by tar21 View Post
I have tried reading before bed but find I can't put the book down and want to read it until the end, and end up staying up just as late as if I was on the computer.
I've finished a book when all I could do was keep one eye open. I read deep, meaning I'm there with them, or don't read. I've also written some of the best intensity when I'm really having trouble focusing on the screen, and later I find a lot of small words skipped and the spelling interesting. But I'm there with my character and when the end of that scene/situation is reached, I've discovered the computer still on and connected when I get up. And I always shut it down and disconnect it from the net before I put myself to bed.

What I've found is that there is this moment of total absorbtion and concentration when your too sleepy to control things, and you just let it flow and often its the sweet space for really being part of both reading a story or writing it.

I've had sleep problems all my life, but didn't find a way to lose them until I stopped trying to force things. When I'm ready to sleep, not just rest in bed, I go to bed. I crash quick and sleep well. We're all different and I think the ways we solve things like how to sleep restfully can differ drastically, but if they work, they work.
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Old 03-07-2015, 09:33 PM
 
Location: United States
359 posts, read 238,570 times
Reputation: 207
Quote:
Originally Posted by nightbird47 View Post
My cats snuggle and the dogs cuddle next to them. When I've been without them its hard to sleep. I think how they effect your sleep depends on your personal relationship with your critters. Nala curls up under my chin when I go to bed (she's kitten sized but full grown) and I relax right away. I wake up with them cuddled next to me and hate to get up its so perfectly peaceful.

The two who fight do not come in to join mom in sleep.
AWWW so sweet
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Old 03-21-2015, 06:57 PM
 
Location: Purgatory
6,322 posts, read 5,073,209 times
Reputation: 9781
Tar21-

You need to see a sleep doctor. The sooner the better. That seems like the obvious conclusion from everything you've said. I really hope that you do.
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