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Old 11-01-2015, 09:49 AM
Status: "The lesser of two evils is still evil." (set 25 days ago)
 
Location: City Data Land
16,284 posts, read 9,655,168 times
Reputation: 31699

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Quote:
Originally Posted by NYSinger View Post
If he really is bipolar, the anti-depressants would make him go manic
Not necessarily. I'm bipolar, the depressive end, and my psychiatrist prescribes antidepressants ocasionally when I'm having difficult episodes. She has to rotate my meds frequently, and the mood stabilizers often cause insomnia or weight gain, so she gives me antidepressants which do not have those side effects and pull me out of the depression. As for the answer to OP's question, I would think the psychiatrist would know the diagnosis far more than we would and from what he/she described, it sounds dead-on.
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Old 11-01-2015, 02:24 PM
 
Location: PANAMA
1,424 posts, read 1,150,943 times
Reputation: 1156
Quote:
Originally Posted by WeHa View Post
Oh-eve, thought this might be an interesting read for you, it's about "soft bipolar" which is more depression than mania, but still a bipolar reaction versus unipolar depression.



Soft Bipolar - What Is It? Do YOU Have It? Discover the Clues You MUST Look For.

Soft bipolar is just another version of cychlotimia. There's actually 3 types of BD:

1. Bipolar 1

2. Bipolar 2 (the most common)

3. Cychlotimia (also very common specially on people having a clinical history with antidepressants)

4. There's also a version unclassified by some experts.

There's also classification regarding the intensity like rapid cycling, mixed (hypomania) which some experts use and others don't

Bipolar Disorder Symptoms and Types - WebMD
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Old 11-01-2015, 02:41 PM
 
6,319 posts, read 6,069,900 times
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The one thing my experiences this year with experts has taught me - so, so much of this is new even to them.

For example up until 5 years ago no one knew the brain could regenerate.

Now we know it can.

My own therapist had a patient who asked him if she could reduce her personal trauma shut down period to zero. It was 63 days which is incredibly disabling.

His response "impossible" because it was. According to everything he'd been taught and seen.

Then she did it, (with his help), and this itself has rewritten Australian psychiatry a tiny bit. My therapist learns from his own patients. That's why they record it all and go over it afterwards - to teach and to learn themselves.

The CNC I go to is also a Learning Establishment, has a college attached. It is the primary Social Work Training facility in my city, also the go-to for the Courts and CPS.

Note - NOT psychiatry or even psychology, although My Guy has degrees in both and Masters in one. My therapists are training in Social Work. Weird.

But not so weird - having BPD means that traditional psych based therapy does not work for me. BPD is not classified as a Mental Illness but as a dysfunction, something that's part of me I have to learn to deal with.

You can go into remission and I was apparently in remission for 30 years.

Then, a combo of life crises sent me tumbling.

I needed a CNC to dig me out. A psych was useless as their therapy doesn't work for BPDs.
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Old 11-01-2015, 03:53 PM
 
3,431 posts, read 3,357,874 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skywalker2014 View Post
Soft bipolar is just another version of cychlotimia. There's actually 3 types of BD:

1. Bipolar 1

2. Bipolar 2 (the most common)

3. Cychlotimia (also very common specially on people having a clinical history with antidepressants)

4. There's also a version unclassified by some experts.

There's also classification regarding the intensity like rapid cycling, mixed (hypomania) which some experts use and others don't

Bipolar Disorder Symptoms and Types - WebMD
There's even schizoaffective disorder--which is a combination of a mood disorder along with symptoms of schizophrenia being experienced by the same person.

There are a lot of grey areas for bipolar disorder. Thus the need for a professional opinion.
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Old 11-01-2015, 04:17 PM
 
2,937 posts, read 1,899,264 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cindersslipper View Post
But not so weird - having BPD means that traditional psych based therapy does not work for me. BPD is not classified as a Mental Illness but as a dysfunction, something that's part of me I have to learn to deal with.

You can go into remission and I was apparently in remission for 30 years.

Then, a combo of life crises sent me tumbling.

I needed a CNC to dig me out. A psych was useless as their therapy doesn't work for BPDs.
Maybe in Australia it's classified that way, but in America BPD is very much a mental illness. A very severe mental illness.

As for treatment, back in the 80s a woman named Marsha Lenihan created a therapy called Dialectical Behavioral Therapy. She did so because she herself had BPD and when she found a way to get better she set to work finding a way to help others. Fun fact, there is a nationally know mental health hospital where I live that runs an Intensive Outpatient Dialectical Behavioral Therapy program. The building they use, was once patient rooms and is where Marsha Lenihan was committed to for years as a young woman, fighting her BPD.

DBT is now used in most group therapy and treatment programs, often combined with CBT. It's obviously not a magic cure all, but it has a better success rate than most other treatment modalities.
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Old 11-01-2015, 06:52 PM
 
Location: MA
1,622 posts, read 1,421,762 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WeHa View Post
Maybe in Australia it's classified that way, but in America BPD is very much a mental illness. A very severe mental illness.

As for treatment, back in the 80s a woman named Marsha Lenihan created a therapy called Dialectical Behavioral Therapy. She did so because she herself had BPD and when she found a way to get better she set to work finding a way to help others. Fun fact, there is a nationally know mental health hospital where I live that runs an Intensive Outpatient Dialectical Behavioral Therapy program. The building they use, was once patient rooms and is where Marsha Lenihan was committed to for years as a young woman, fighting her BPD.

DBT is now used in most group therapy and treatment programs, often combined with CBT. It's obviously not a magic cure all, but it has a better success rate than most other treatment modalities.

It appears that things are totally different in Australia
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Old 11-01-2015, 07:52 PM
 
2,937 posts, read 1,899,264 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stormynh View Post
It appears that things are totally different in Australia
Well I mean the toilets do flush in the wrong direction
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Old 11-02-2015, 08:04 AM
 
Location: PANAMA
1,424 posts, read 1,150,943 times
Reputation: 1156
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ottawa2011 View Post
There's even schizoaffective disorder--which is a combination of a mood disorder along with symptoms of schizophrenia being experienced by the same person.

There are a lot of grey areas for bipolar disorder. Thus the need for a professional opinion.
Indeed but the lack of professional opinion doesn't exclude us to learn more about a very common illness. Lack of info is why it's a stigma.
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Old 11-02-2015, 09:53 AM
 
Location: SoCal again
17,261 posts, read 14,233,380 times
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There is a professional opinion:

Depression, PTSD, and OCD.

Me and friend just think there is also bipolar involved, especially since his dad had it also and the depression meds don't work.
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Old 11-02-2015, 11:44 AM
 
10,194 posts, read 7,663,789 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oh-eve View Post
There is a professional opinion:

Depression, PTSD, and OCD.

Me and friend just think there is also bipolar involved, especially since his dad had it also and the depression meds don't work.
Has your friend shared with the psych that he is concerned about bipolar?
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