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Old 11-07-2015, 09:03 AM
 
3,537 posts, read 2,706,272 times
Reputation: 7132

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Just an FYI that Cymbalta/duloxetine is a drug that can be really hard to come off, and many people have to do a very long taper. If you Google "Cymbalta withdrawal", you will find entire websites devoted to this problem. Some people are able to taper off it pretty quickly, but lots are not able to do so.
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Old 11-25-2015, 12:38 AM
 
Location: The Bubble
11 posts, read 5,453 times
Reputation: 32
Hey Bird,
I have a bipolar I and PTSD dx, I was medicated off and on (access to care permitting) for nearly ten years, until finally stopping entirely about four years ago. For me, learning about and understanding my 'disorder' , setting up guidelines, fail safes, self checks, etc, establishing what I call my 'panel of advisors,' and finding a really good therapist was enough to get me out of the nasty drug cycle. Every time you start or stop those medications your system reacts and goes nuts until it can equalize again. I picture it as the ripples of waves after a ball is dropped on a calm pond. Your emotions go up, down like a yuo-yo. You will go through cycles now that you're free. In the midst of depression time seems nonexistent, in the throws of mania it seems to race by, but the one thing I found constant was and is, now. Once I framed my experiences in that perspective, repeating to myself 'this too, shall pass,' and remembering that how I FELT was temporary, I began to define and see 'normal.' I ended up successfully battling a child custody case in pro per, admittedly bipolar, off of prescriptions, and medicating with cannibas, against a vindictive ex with a lawyer and family with deep pockets backing him. I have learned how to live without psychotropic medications, but credit them for their role in my journey. It was necessary forms to understand how easily influenced my mood and behavior was.
Everything you see, feel, experience, remember and believe can easily be influenced by your mood, brain chemistry, ultimately your disposition, at any time. I take everything with a grain of salt, imagine that I see and experience the world more vividly than most, and that I need only 'pretend' to be normal to exist as such. Try to see yourself as others see you, plan, and respond accordingly. You should establish a plan for yourself to be admitted to a hospital ifnecessary, make a suicide prevdntion plan, and write out you plan to keep yourself safe. Establish a few friends you can call if/when you need help.

~"You never know how strong you are until being strong is the only choice you have"
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Old 11-25-2015, 04:22 PM
 
10,194 posts, read 7,663,789 times
Reputation: 24015
Quote:
Originally Posted by ForeverSarah View Post
Hey Bird,
I have a bipolar I and PTSD dx, I was medicated off and on (access to care permitting) for nearly ten years, until finally stopping entirely about four years ago. For me, learning about and understanding my 'disorder' , setting up guidelines, fail safes, self checks, etc, establishing what I call my 'panel of advisors,' and finding a really good therapist was enough to get me out of the nasty drug cycle. Every time you start or stop those medications your system reacts and goes nuts until it can equalize again. I picture it as the ripples of waves after a ball is dropped on a calm pond. Your emotions go up, down like a yuo-yo. You will go through cycles now that you're free. In the midst of depression time seems nonexistent, in the throws of mania it seems to race by, but the one thing I found constant was and is, now. Once I framed my experiences in that perspective, repeating to myself 'this too, shall pass,' and remembering that how I FELT was temporary, I began to define and see 'normal.' I ended up successfully battling a child custody case in pro per, admittedly bipolar, off of prescriptions, and medicating with cannibas, against a vindictive ex with a lawyer and family with deep pockets backing him. I have learned how to live without psychotropic medications, but credit them for their role in my journey. It was necessary forms to understand how easily influenced my mood and behavior was.
Everything you see, feel, experience, remember and believe can easily be influenced by your mood, brain chemistry, ultimately your disposition, at any time. I take everything with a grain of salt, imagine that I see and experience the world more vividly than most, and that I need only 'pretend' to be normal to exist as such. Try to see yourself as others see you, plan, and respond accordingly. You should establish a plan for yourself to be admitted to a hospital ifnecessary, make a suicide prevdntion plan, and write out you plan to keep yourself safe. Establish a few friends you can call if/when you need help.

~"You never know how strong you are until being strong is the only choice you have"
Thanks for sharing your story. I have been off 8 weeks and feel so much better. I feel happy. And sad. And sometimes angry. It's so much better then feeling nothing. My therapist has seen a lot of his clients through getting off of meds and he thinks I am going to do well.

It was a roller coaster. I won't lie. I felt really terrible for a while. I had terrible restless leg syndrome for a while. I was short tempered at times. But after 6 weeks I started to really feel like I was coming out of a fog.

I have ptsd and that's my primary diagnosis. I don't even know if I qualify for it now. Maybe. I've worked hard in therapy for 5 years and am back in therapy with a new therapist (I moved). So maybe we will find more stuff under it all but overall I feel like I am doing pretty good.
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Old 11-26-2015, 03:10 PM
 
Location: Cushing OK
14,545 posts, read 18,420,696 times
Reputation: 16831
Quote:
Originally Posted by HighFlyingBird View Post
Thanks for sharing your story. I have been off 8 weeks and feel so much better. I feel happy. And sad. And sometimes angry. It's so much better then feeling nothing. My therapist has seen a lot of his clients through getting off of meds and he thinks I am going to do well.

It was a roller coaster. I won't lie. I felt really terrible for a while. I had terrible restless leg syndrome for a while. I was short tempered at times. But after 6 weeks I started to really feel like I was coming out of a fog.

I have ptsd and that's my primary diagnosis. I don't even know if I qualify for it now. Maybe. I've worked hard in therapy for 5 years and am back in therapy with a new therapist (I moved). So maybe we will find more stuff under it all but overall I feel like I am doing pretty good.
I'm very happy for you. I heard a lot of complaints from people who didn't have the nerve to disagree with the 'system'.

I would go to the pdoc. I'd say its not working. I don't sleep. Two to three hours a day isn't enough. So he ads ambien. Add a fog to the rest. Lots of extra weight and yet no appetite.

I started researching, and cutting it all back, but very painfully slowly. But then I started realizing that I was getting sleepy and getting enough sleep. That in itself helped hugely. And I have/had 'issues' but all the meds did was make them vanish. But they are/were real. So when they come up I work through them.

I've been off meds for about six years. I still cycle but not drastically. It's the individual things from old trauma which hits the hardest, and with a drugged haze you'll never get to where you can leave them behind. And that haze, its really joyfull when you realize you can make it go away.

So, I'm not 'normal'. I still get hijacked by things and have learned to let them be long enough to see what makes them stick, and then do what you need to. Maybe grieve for them. It's scary to let it have you but it has to be drained. Maybe use the intelect to pick them apart, and see how fundamentally they don't make sense. Take a notebook and a good pen and just write all the feelings out. Don't type it, since when you look at the words you'll see how at first its messy and scribbled and as the words calm so does the writing. But when you open up the secret hiding place, you can let things go.

And my view of the world isn't conventional. During the time with the 'system' all the stuff about 'needs to socialize' just proved I can sit in a room and not be there. But if I see things differently, why not? What says we should all see the same picture in the random lines?

Hang in there. Keeping a journal really helps too. And finding the things which help even out life. But all I know is that since I reclaimed myself from pills, I feel like me, and not like a pod person.

I know with me one problem was that meds and especially those in pill form do not work right with me. I do not absorb pills right, especially if there's a coating. So there isn't any reason for psych ones to work any better. If a patient has that situation, it ought to be part of the consideration from the start.

The problem with the 'system' is it is trying to do mass production in a situation where that won't work.
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Old 12-01-2015, 01:38 PM
 
Location: In The Thin Air
12,559 posts, read 8,731,700 times
Reputation: 9201
It took me two months to get off of Peroxetine CR 12.5 MG. It was a low dose but I was on it for almost 9 years. I didn't have any of the crazy side effects that you hear about. I am back on another SSRI but so far it is no where near as good as Peroxetine was.

My doctor helped me get off of it by prescribing me the non CR pill and then cutting it by a quarter every two weeks. For some people that is way too fast. Some people it takes months or even years to get off of an SSRI.
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