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Old 08-13-2011, 01:15 PM
 
Location: Vancouver, B.C., Canada
11,031 posts, read 26,103,928 times
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The relationship between Mexico and Canada has grown continuously since the establishment of diplomatic relations in 1944. Our trade and investment relationship has grown exponentially since the entry into force of the North America Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) in 1994. Today, with increasing bilateral trade and investment; regular parliamentary meetings; North American collaboration with our common neighbour, the United States, in areas such as security, competitiveness and the environment; as well as international and regional cooperation in forums such as the United Nations and the OAS, Canada and Mexico have become important strategic partners.
The Canada-Mexico relationship is characterized by sustained political engagement and fluid dialogue in the bilateral, North American, hemispheric and multilateral contexts.

In May 2010, on the occasion of the visit of President Calderón to Canada, both governments signed an updated 2010-2012 Canada-Mexico Joint Action Plan which established four priorities for the bilateral relationship: fostering competitive and sustainable economies; protection of citizens of both countries; enhancement of people-to-people contacts and the projection of the partnership regionally and globally.

from: Canada-Mexico Relations

Last edited by GTOlover; 08-13-2011 at 01:19 PM.. Reason: added info...
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Old 08-13-2011, 02:09 PM
 
Location: Vancouver, B.C., Canada
11,031 posts, read 26,103,928 times
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both Canada and Mexico's Federal govronment have signed the Joint Action plan to boost trade and Foster Stronger ties to each other..Which As a Canadian think is a great thing for both our countries..
http://www.canadainternational.gc.ca/mexico-mexique/assets/pdfs/Mexico-***.pdf (broken link)
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Old 08-14-2011, 09:26 AM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,661 posts, read 81,029,699 times
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"According to a spokesman, who asked not to be identified because he is not authorized to comment on matters of diplomatic sensitivity, their talks were cordial and frank." Diplomatic gibberish.

Do Canada and Mexico trade with each other, or don't they? Are there any significant trade barriers?
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Old 08-16-2011, 04:01 PM
 
155 posts, read 344,463 times
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I truly love Canada, adn I deeply love Mexico as well (a bit too much)... I believe the relationship between the two countries is not only good but great. However, I find this article interesnting.

Canada’s disrespect for Mexico a bad bet on future
Ottawa— From Wednesday's Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Mar. 09, 2011 6:00AM EST

The United States and Canada have shut Mexico out of the negotiations for a North American “perimeter” that would replace our obsolete national borders with an integrated continental border. This is a huge mistake, a scandalous betrayal of a poorer amigo by two richer amigos. It isn’t merely that we have hurt Mexico’s feelings (which, deeply, we have). It’s that we need Mexico in the deal – but don’t know it.

It was Mexico that first – within days of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks – formally proposed a three-country perimeter. Canada dismissed the suggestion out of hand. Canada had a “special relationship” with the United States, and didn’t want to contaminate it. Ottawa has never wavered in its defence of this superior, pristine relationship. When Prime Minister Stephen Harper joined President Barack Obama early in February to announce that negotiations had begun, he echoed this sentiment: “America has no better friend,” he said, “than Canada.” So there, amigo. Take that.

Canadians err greatly in thinking of Mexico as southern trash. The country’s drug wars are a huge problem but so are the U.S. and Canadian laws that make the drugs illegal, not to mention the Americans and Canadians who drive demand by using them. Illicit drugs kill far more Americans (20,000 every year) than Mexicans (30,000 of whom have died, over several years, in the drug wars).

Mexico’s drug wars, however, won’t last forever. Canada should now be thinking more for the future than for the present or, for that matter, the past. It is a simple fact that the continental border will work best with continental participation. A U.S. government report published in February, by the way, concluded that the terrorist threat on the Canadian border, mile for mile, is much higher than on the Mexican border – an accurate (though, for Canada, awkward) finding.

Further, Mexico has a tremendous future. In a 2007 analysis (entitled “BRICs and Beyond”), Goldman Sachs predicted that Mexico would be one of the five biggest economies in the world by 2050 – with GDP of $9.3-trillion (up from $1-trillion) and per-capita GDP of $63,149 (up from $13,800). If so, this would mean a fourfold expansion of per-capita GDP. In the same period, Goldman Sachs said, Canada’s GDP would rise to $3.1-trillion from $1.4-trillion, slightly more than a twofold increase.

Goldman Sachs’ top 10 for 2050 puts Mexico’s GDP advance into a global perspective: (1) China’s GDP, $70-trillion; (2) U.S. GDP, $38.5-trillion; (3) India, $37.6-trillion; (4) Brazil, $11.3-trillion; (5) Mexico, $9.3-trillion. The runners-up were: (6) Russia, $8.5-trillion; (7) Indonesia, $7-trillion; (8) Japan, $6.6-trillion; (9) Britain, $5.1-trillion; and (10) Germany, $5-trillion. Canada’s GDP would marginally exceed Philippine GDP ($3-trillion), the report said.

Strategic thinker George Friedman, author of the 2009 book The Next 100 Years, notes that people, for the most part, have not yet grasped the progress that Mexico has made in the past 25 years. He cites the UN Human Development Index, which measures global standards of living. This index ranks Mexico with Europe, Canada and the United States, meaning that Mexico can no longer be regarded as a developing country.

Canadians, of all people, should understand why Mexico has advanced so far, so fast – and why it will advance further: Given reasonable laws and administration, geography is destiny. As for the drug wars, Mr. Friedman anticipates that the cartels will invest much of the proceeds in legitimate businesses, both in the U.S. and Mexico. In the first generation, he says, drug lords launder money; in the second, they bequeath “fairly legitimate pools of money” to their families; in the third, the heirs become “economic aristocrats.” Ultimately, Mr. Friedman says, the drug lords will drive faster rates of growth.

Beginning in the 1920s, he notes, organized crime did the same thing in the United States. Mexico will go through periods of stress and strain but, almost certainly, will emerge as “a mature, balanced economy” with a stable population (up to 150 million from 110 million). It is a country with which Canada will aspire to have a “special relationship.” Mexico is already our partner in trade. Canada should insist that it be a full partner in our common border.



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Old 08-17-2011, 08:01 AM
 
88 posts, read 178,592 times
Reputation: 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by Geree View Post
I truly love Canada, adn I deeply love Mexico as well (a bit too much)... I believe the relationship between the two countries is not only good but great. However, I find this article interesnting.

Canada’s disrespect for Mexico a bad bet on future
Ottawa— From Wednesday's Globe and Mail
Published Wednesday, Mar. 09, 2011 6:00AM EST

The United States and Canada have shut Mexico out of the negotiations for a North American “perimeter” that would replace our obsolete national borders with an integrated continental border. This is a huge mistake, a scandalous betrayal of a poorer amigo by two richer amigos. It isn’t merely that we have hurt Mexico’s feelings (which, deeply, we have). It’s that we need Mexico in the deal – but don’t know it.

It was Mexico that first – within days of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks – formally proposed a three-country perimeter. Canada dismissed the suggestion out of hand. Canada had a “special relationship” with the United States, and didn’t want to contaminate it. Ottawa has never wavered in its defence of this superior, pristine relationship. When Prime Minister Stephen Harper joined President Barack Obama early in February to announce that negotiations had begun, he echoed this sentiment: “America has no better friend,” he said, “than Canada.” So there, amigo. Take that.

Canadians err greatly in thinking of Mexico as southern trash. The country’s drug wars are a huge problem but so are the U.S. and Canadian laws that make the drugs illegal, not to mention the Americans and Canadians who drive demand by using them. Illicit drugs kill far more Americans (20,000 every year) than Mexicans (30,000 of whom have died, over several years, in the drug wars).

Mexico’s drug wars, however, won’t last forever. Canada should now be thinking more for the future than for the present or, for that matter, the past. It is a simple fact that the continental border will work best with continental participation. A U.S. government report published in February, by the way, concluded that the terrorist threat on the Canadian border, mile for mile, is much higher than on the Mexican border – an accurate (though, for Canada, awkward) finding.

Further, Mexico has a tremendous future. In a 2007 analysis (entitled “BRICs and Beyond”), Goldman Sachs predicted that Mexico would be one of the five biggest economies in the world by 2050 – with GDP of $9.3-trillion (up from $1-trillion) and per-capita GDP of $63,149 (up from $13,800). If so, this would mean a fourfold expansion of per-capita GDP. In the same period, Goldman Sachs said, Canada’s GDP would rise to $3.1-trillion from $1.4-trillion, slightly more than a twofold increase.

Goldman Sachs’ top 10 for 2050 puts Mexico’s GDP advance into a global perspective: (1) China’s GDP, $70-trillion; (2) U.S. GDP, $38.5-trillion; (3) India, $37.6-trillion; (4) Brazil, $11.3-trillion; (5) Mexico, $9.3-trillion. The runners-up were: (6) Russia, $8.5-trillion; (7) Indonesia, $7-trillion; (8) Japan, $6.6-trillion; (9) Britain, $5.1-trillion; and (10) Germany, $5-trillion. Canada’s GDP would marginally exceed Philippine GDP ($3-trillion), the report said.

Strategic thinker George Friedman, author of the 2009 book The Next 100 Years, notes that people, for the most part, have not yet grasped the progress that Mexico has made in the past 25 years. He cites the UN Human Development Index, which measures global standards of living. This index ranks Mexico with Europe, Canada and the United States, meaning that Mexico can no longer be regarded as a developing country.

Canadians, of all people, should understand why Mexico has advanced so far, so fast – and why it will advance further: Given reasonable laws and administration, geography is destiny. As for the drug wars, Mr. Friedman anticipates that the cartels will invest much of the proceeds in legitimate businesses, both in the U.S. and Mexico. In the first generation, he says, drug lords launder money; in the second, they bequeath “fairly legitimate pools of money” to their families; in the third, the heirs become “economic aristocrats.” Ultimately, Mr. Friedman says, the drug lords will drive faster rates of growth.

Beginning in the 1920s, he notes, organized crime did the same thing in the United States. Mexico will go through periods of stress and strain but, almost certainly, will emerge as “a mature, balanced economy” with a stable population (up to 150 million from 110 million). It is a country with which Canada will aspire to have a “special relationship.” Mexico is already our partner in trade. Canada should insist that it be a full partner in our common border.



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You know what I find amazing about that list. Canada a population of 34 million people is number 8.
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Old 08-18-2011, 06:16 PM
 
155 posts, read 344,463 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hamlin6969 View Post
You know what I find amazing about that list. Canada a population of 34 million people is number 8.
Yess... Canada is amazing!
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Old 08-21-2011, 02:55 AM
 
25,058 posts, read 25,861,624 times
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That article is a load of crock. I agree with the comments in that article. Of course Mexico would love to be in political union with the U.S. and Canada. They stand to gain the most from it while we lose
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Old 08-21-2011, 12:22 PM
 
155 posts, read 344,463 times
Reputation: 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by theunbrainwashed View Post
That article is a load of crock. I agree with the comments in that article. Of course Mexico would love to be in political union with the U.S. and Canada. They stand to gain the most from it while we lose
What do you lose? Are you afraid of something?

Mexico is not only in political union with the U.S. and Canada, the three countries share a big pile of matters since a while ago.
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Old 08-21-2011, 05:21 PM
 
25,058 posts, read 25,861,624 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Geree View Post
What do you lose? Are you afraid of something?

Mexico is not only in political union with the U.S. and Canada, the three countries share a big pile of matters since a while ago.
I don't want to lose my Constitution and the case law we've built since 1787 and I don't feel like living in a EU style country is not in the best interests of anybody but Mexico.

That may be, but we're better off being our own separate 3 countries.
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Old 08-21-2011, 06:30 PM
 
3,204 posts, read 2,688,191 times
Reputation: 1545
Can I move from the US to Canada and get free health care?
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