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Old 07-18-2013, 08:26 PM
 
313 posts, read 647,202 times
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3.2% county population rise in year

Quote:
Population in households in Miami-Dade County has grown 3.2% in a year in the latest numbers released by the US Census Bureau.

The Metropolitan Statistical Area grew 1.57%, from 5,582,351 to 5,670,125 persons, which means Miami-Dade grew more than Broward and Palm Beach counties combined, said Robert Cruz, chief economist for the county.
Quote:
Out of about 50,000 incoming people — the population increase in 2011 — close to 16,000 are foreign-born, Mr. Cruz said. That represents 32% of that year's growth.
Quote:
One interesting fact from 2011 is that Europeans and Latin Americans each represent 14% of the county's population growth that year. "That may reflect the economic conditions in Europe," Mr. Cruz said.

However, foreign-born newcomers don't necessarily move directly from their home countries to Miami-Dade, as the census includes in this category those who were born abroad but have lived in other parts of the US, he said.

The census figures don't unearth any major shifts in the foreign-born population in terms of country of birth, Mr. Cruz said. "Cubans make up more than a half of it."

Colombia and Haiti both moved up one notch in the ranking of foreign-born populations in the county, rising to second and third place, between 2007 and 2011, according to the data.
Quote:
Where in the US are the remaining 68% of the new residents coming from?
"Historically, we get people mainly from the Northeast, and some from the Midwest," Mr. Cruz said.
But most of them are no longer retirees — who now tend to seek Florida's West Coast — but rather younger adults coming in search of job opportunities and a socially active city, the chief economist said.
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Old 07-18-2013, 09:17 PM
 
313 posts, read 647,202 times
Reputation: 205
Couple things stick out to me.

I thought PBC was set to take the bulk of new residents in South Florida. I'm really surprised to see Dade growing so much more than Broward and Palm Beach.

Only 32% foreign born growth? I thought it was consistently more than half, the article doesn't mention anything but I found that 68% growth from the US to be pretty impressive. Especially considering the unemployment rate and weak economy in South Florida.

Interesting to see European immigration picking up so much in Miami too.
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Old 07-19-2013, 02:32 AM
 
Location: western East Roman Empire
9,358 posts, read 14,301,405 times
Reputation: 10080
Quote:
Originally Posted by unclealbertt View Post
Couple things stick out to me.

I thought PBC was set to take the bulk of new residents in South Florida. I'm really surprised to see Dade growing so much more than Broward and Palm Beach.

Only 32% foreign born growth? I thought it was consistently more than half, the article doesn't mention anything but I found that 68% growth from the US to be pretty impressive. Especially considering the unemployment rate and weak economy in South Florida.

Interesting to see European immigration picking up so much in Miami too.
None of this surprises me.

Miami-Dade County, especially its strategic corridor, is an integral part of the global trade circuit (it is number one in US in internatonal air freight) and regional specialist; on that score it beats Broward and Palm Beach Counties with a stick, its main rivals instead are Houston, which specializes in energy, Jacksonville, Savannah, and further afield New York, and PortMiami is preparing to receive the world's largest container ships.

On top of that, of course, it offers, like the rest of southern Florida, warmth and water (no small thing, ask those in southern California), as well as no state income tax.

Finally, and this escapes a lot of people, Miami-Dade County is on US soil, appealing to those 68%, and under US administration, appealing to those 32%, apparently equally South Americans and Europeans. Miami is the meeting place for all such people, bringing trade and capital, and we have the industrial technology, oh for about a century now, to make it work relatively comfortably.

Anyway, from my perspective, there is no doubt that the recent uptick in European presence has to do with the ongoing recession and increase in effective tax rates in Europe: I know a European guy whose business is to help other European (and Latin American) businesspeople obtain investor visas to come set up shop in Miami, and over the past year or so his business is booming, he just bought a house in Pinecrest.

Miami-Dade County Office of Economic Development and International Trade

Last edited by bale002; 07-19-2013 at 02:52 AM..
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Old 08-28-2013, 10:05 PM
 
313 posts, read 647,202 times
Reputation: 205
Quote:
Unexpected twist to Miami population gain

Miami-Dade's non-Hispanic white population grew at a faster rate than Hispanics from 2010 to 2012, according to a US Census Bureau July estimate.

The county's total population grew by about 3.4%, from 2,504,614 to 2,591,035, in two years. "As population grows the economy tends to grow," said Robert Cruz, chief county economist.

The new numbers show growth trends, Mr. Cruz said, but the full and more in-depth 2012 American Community Survey, which provides more than numbers, is due later in the year. The comparison with 2010 is based upon the July estimates of that year as well, he said.

Even though the preliminary report doesn't specify where people are moving to Miami-Dade from, non-Hispanic whites now make up 16.3% of the county's population, rising from 15.4% in 2010. Non-Hispanic blacks or African Americans have remained at 17% of the total.

Hispanics, however, have decreased as a percentage of the total from 65.2% to 64.3% in the past two years.
"I would not have expected that trend," Mr. Cruz said, but he confirmed that the non-Hispanic white group grew by about 10,000 more people than the Hispanic group.

It's quite unusual, considering that from 2000 to 2011 non-Hispanics who identified themselves as white declined not only as a share of county population but in absolute terms, according to census data.
"In the last two years that trend appears to have changed," Mr. Cruz said. "The number of non-Hispanic whites increased in 2011 and 2012 and increased as a share of the total population in both years. The population of non-Hispanic black or African Americans has remained nearly unchanged since the early 2000s, but continues to decline as a proportion of the total population."
http://www.miamitodaynews.com/news/130829/story3.shtml

It'd be interesting to find out when was the last time this happened in Miami. You'd probably have to go back to the 70's to find a time when non-Hispanic whites grew more than Hispanics.
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Old 08-29-2013, 07:19 PM
 
Location: Heartland Florida
9,324 posts, read 26,743,113 times
Reputation: 5038
It is no surprise, if you are in a parking lot in a thunderstorm you will notice how the water flows to the low spots and drains. Miami is like the storm drain of the caribbean. When the populations of the world overflow, they end up flowing in Miami. Miami is also a center of money laundering and government spending. The medical froud and insurance fraud are staggering. Wages are the lowest of amy major Florida city, except for the client hires and special positions. Corruption, graft and nepotism rule. It is telling how many are educated in Miami area universities and then run for the exits to start their careers. Go to any supermarket and see how long you wait at the cashier when those new residents struggle to use their EBT and SNAP cards.
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Old 08-30-2013, 12:50 PM
 
Location: America
6,993 posts, read 17,361,781 times
Reputation: 2093
Quote:
Originally Posted by bale002 View Post
None of this surprises me.

Miami-Dade County, especially its strategic corridor, is an integral part of the global trade circuit (it is number one in US in internatonal air freight) and regional specialist; on that score it beats Broward and Palm Beach Counties with a stick, its main rivals instead are Houston, which specializes in energy, Jacksonville, Savannah, and further afield New York, and PortMiami is preparing to receive the world's largest container ships.

On top of that, of course, it offers, like the rest of southern Florida, warmth and water (no small thing, ask those in southern California), as well as no state income tax.

Finally, and this escapes a lot of people, Miami-Dade County is on US soil, appealing to those 68%, and under US administration, appealing to those 32%, apparently equally South Americans and Europeans. Miami is the meeting place for all such people, bringing trade and capital, and we have the industrial technology, oh for about a century now, to make it work relatively comfortably.

Anyway, from my perspective, there is no doubt that the recent uptick in European presence has to do with the ongoing recession and increase in effective tax rates in Europe: I know a European guy whose business is to help other European (and Latin American) businesspeople obtain investor visas to come set up shop in Miami, and over the past year or so his business is booming, he just bought a house in Pinecrest.

Miami-Dade County Office of Economic Development and International Trade
I think Bale nailed it! In the grove we have TONS of Parisians and I do mean TONS. Its both Black and White Parisians at that. I have also seen french speaking West Africans in the Grove, mostly Senegalese it would seem.
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Old 09-29-2014, 10:37 AM
 
Location: Miami Beach, FL
106 posts, read 174,162 times
Reputation: 83
Miami has a bright future.. Now with the new port o Miami upgrade, lots of economic opportunities.
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Old 09-29-2014, 05:16 PM
 
1,905 posts, read 2,789,006 times
Reputation: 1086
It is the gateway to Latin American and contrary to what people believe a lot of companies set up their Latin American divisions in Miami. So a lot of opportunities for bilingual and Spanish speakers to come and work an get good jobs. The wages are low in certain industries like service ones which is to be expected because that is true all across the country. I hope Miami Dade keeps booming and attraction young professionals so we can build a more diversified economy.
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Old 09-30-2014, 08:17 AM
 
604 posts, read 617,992 times
Reputation: 698
Quote:
Colombia and Haiti both moved up one notch in the ranking of foreign-born populations in the county, rising to second and third place, between 2007 and 2011, according to the data.
Strange that so many Colombians come to the US (and European countries) and they always say that their country is now safe, booming and whatnot.

The other countries making the top of the list are in dire situation.
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Old 10-01-2014, 08:59 AM
 
Location: Miami Beach, FL
106 posts, read 174,162 times
Reputation: 83
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fl1150 View Post
It is the gateway to Latin American and contrary to what people believe a lot of companies set up their Latin American divisions in Miami. So a lot of opportunities for bilingual and Spanish speakers to come and work an get good jobs. The wages are low in certain industries like service ones which is to be expected because that is true all across the country. I hope Miami Dade keeps booming and attraction young professionals so we can build a more diversified economy.
What Miami needs, is more then just a tourism and real estate based economy, it should also have a heavy manufacturing based economy, bring companies from out of state, Canada and elsewhere here and with the help of the port/ airport (very close by), their goods can be transported efficiently. The key word here is, diversification. More jobs = more taxes, more money in the pocket of the Miami people, not just tourist coming over to spend.

Add let say 50,000 decent enough to really good paying jobs, this equals more money in their pockets, more savings, plus higher taxed obtained. Families will benefit, parents will be able to raise their kids properly, crime drops, and much more... everything changes for the better.
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