U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Florida > Miami
 [Register]
Miami Miami-Dade County
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
 
Old 10-01-2008, 08:06 PM
 
Location: Hialeah, FL
483 posts, read 1,401,219 times
Reputation: 117

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by big mean bear View Post
Are you suffering from a lack of an original idea or was it just hard to express yourself in words?
Wow.
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-01-2008, 08:24 PM
 
1,369 posts, read 3,399,324 times
Reputation: 447
Quote:
Originally Posted by TannerMan View Post
Wow.
Which one was it? Maybe the Hialeah accent is rubbing off on you...
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-01-2008, 11:06 PM
 
200 posts, read 815,848 times
Reputation: 70
Interesting. I was born/raised in SW Florida and recently moved to North Florida and I was told by locals that I have a "Yankee" accent! I thought I had No accent but I think it's really weird that they pegged me for a Northerner.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-02-2008, 08:33 AM
 
Location: Miami
6,853 posts, read 20,109,749 times
Reputation: 2914
Quote:
Originally Posted by SouthFloridaNative View Post
II thought I had No accent but I think it's really weird that they pegged me for a Northerner.
Everyone has an accent, depending on the ear that is listening to you. If a European heard you speak, they would probably say, you have an American accent. Australians, British, and Americans all speak the same language basically, but we all have different accents.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-02-2008, 10:43 AM
 
155 posts, read 411,466 times
Reputation: 35
a lot people here call me yankee also i live in north fl SouthFloridaNative
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-02-2008, 02:03 PM
 
Location: Hialeah, FL
483 posts, read 1,401,219 times
Reputation: 117
Quote:
Originally Posted by big mean bear View Post
Which one was it? Maybe the Hialeah accent is rubbing off on you...
I dont get you. What exactly are you responding to?
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-03-2008, 12:00 AM
 
155 posts, read 411,466 times
Reputation: 35
i saying that get same result as southfl native with a northern accent or call a yankee not just north fl only places its just crazy o well i like my accent by way still have some of miami i think
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-03-2008, 11:21 AM
 
Location: The Queen City
1,087 posts, read 2,432,936 times
Reputation: 663
I totally agree with the Miami Accent. It sounds similar to Gloria Estafan when she speaks English. In fact, I have a Cuban American friend, and she is fluent in both languages, I keep telling her that she has the Cuban American Miami accent, which I have too. So yes, it is true, there is a Miami accent, mainly a Cuban American Miami accent....and I love it!!
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-05-2008, 11:09 PM
 
Location: Miami
350 posts, read 1,370,100 times
Reputation: 204
When I lived in Alabama I was also told I had a "Yankee" accent. And yes, Gloria Estefan does have a version of the Miami accent. I know non-Spanish-speaking anglos who have that accent, too, just from having grown up here.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-08-2008, 12:59 AM
 
38 posts, read 210,393 times
Reputation: 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by money23 View Post
what you think of miami accent and other south cites and other cites

In Miami, a unique accent, commonly called the "Miami accent", is widely spoken. It developed by second- or third-generation Hispanics whose first language was English.
I disagree with this aspect. As a former voice and speech professor, schooled on both the East and West coasts and relocated to So Fla in the late 90's, with collegiate students from all over the US with a large percentage from the Miami area - most of my Miami student's first language was not English. Perhaps English was primarily spoken at school (roughly 8 hours per day), but caregivers (either parents or extended family) most often spoke Spanish. I also observed that Spanish was the default language when in their peer groups at the collegiate level.

If one subscribes to the notion put forth by linguist Eric Englebert, who believed that the crucial period of language acquisition and learned speech patterns ends around the age of 12 years, one can surmise that surely a Miami regionalism, in fact, does exists.

I had several students that wanted to be an actors, yet not be pigeonholed as a "Latin actors." Though born in the US, their regionalisms ensured that they would never get past the "Latin" moniker. When asked what language they spoke at home? Spanish was invariably the answer. What type of music do they listen to? Latin. What do they watch on TV? All Spanish networks and programming. What language does their circle of friends speak? Guess. So in effect, these college students wanted to rid themselves of accents (or at least control it), yet they really only were exposed to English for a few hours a day.

Their progress was minimal at best. Their ear for sound additions, substitutions and omissions was very slow to develop. Contrast that with the student from West Texas that had that thick twang, whose only contact with his speech frame of reference was a weekly call to mom and dad. These students who virtually severed their ties with their familiar speech patterns progressed at a much more rapid rate. The trick was not letting them fall into the Miami speech patterns.

I also noticed that the Miami-esque regionalism was far more previlent in females than males. I would subscribe this to a generally more animated style of talk - but their was a certain pride in sounding like a "chonga."

Of course in speech patterns there are always certain socio-economic theories along with various entertainment stimula. We are talking about a generation that is also greatly influenced by Hip Hip phrasing and Perez Hilton journalism. Mix that with their learned speech patterns, well, how can we expect that not to influence their sound?
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Florida > Miami
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top