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Old 07-15-2010, 04:06 PM
 
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If I were to complete a bachelors degree in Finance at the Dearborn campus, would it be likely that I would get accepted into the Ross business school M.B.A. program in Ann Arbor? (Attending the Ann Arbor campus for my undergraduate degree is simply not an option due to financial and travel constraints).

If anyone with experience at either of these schools - or someone with related insight - has any input, I would greatly appreciate hearing it! Thanks!
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Old 07-15-2010, 06:26 PM
 
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Depending on your performace at U of M-Dearborn I think that you wouldn't have much of a problem to get accepted at UM-Ann Arbor's business graduate program.

Once you get your B.A. at U of M-Dearborn, you technically are not transfering your credits, but showing what you majored in at the undergraduate level at UMD.

I think majoring in Finance would be a good thing to have majored in if you are interested in the Ross School of Business.

I'm not sure how much of this you already knew, but I hope this helps.
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Old 07-16-2010, 05:01 PM
 
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Depends on your grades/other typical admissions factors.

Finance is a great background for a business major.
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Old 07-18-2010, 10:54 AM
 
Location: Michissippi
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I don't have any first-hand knowledge, but I suspect that it's much more difficult to gain admission to one of the nation's top ten business schools than what posters are suggesting.

Would the admissions people even care that you had attended UM-Dearborn (or even UM-Ann Arbor)? It seems like you would probably be judged just like the thousands of other applicants, based on your undergraduate GPA, your GMAT score, and whatever else they require (personal essay, interview, previous work experience, etc.).

The only thing that might be in your favor is that you are a Michigan resident and the school might have some sort of Michigan residents quota that it wants to meet, slightly decreasing the standards for admission. I have a hard time believing that gaining admission is as easy as simply attending UM for an undergraduate degree. If you're really serious about it, why not go to the business school and see if you can talk to someone who does the Admissions work?
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Old 07-18-2010, 11:12 AM
 
Location: north of Windsor, ON
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I've been told you need to be recommended into the UMD MBA program by a member of the faculty of the business school.
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Old 07-19-2010, 08:24 AM
 
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One thing to keep in mind is that top-flight MBA programs typically look for applicants who have at least 2-5 years of real-world business experience. The exception would be someone who discovered a revolutionary new finance theory as an undergrad. A few exceptional students with high GMAT scores and grades from top-flight undergrad programs may be considered without work experience. Assuming that the OP didn't, I'd suggest that s/he focus on getting a job or creating a viable business opportunity and then apply to MBA programs.

If the OP just really wants an MBA degree, there are plenty of programs that will accept folks out of undergrad. However, since around the time I graduated from undergrad, MBA degrees have been handed out like candy to the point where MBAs are a dime a dozen out there. The skills learned in most all of those programs is valuable but if the OP is seeking that corner office in a Fortune 500 company, nothing outside an MBA from a Top 15 program will do.
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Old 07-20-2010, 07:44 AM
 
Location: Grosse Ile Michigan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by enigmaingr View Post
One thing to keep in mind is that top-flight MBA programs typically look for applicants who have at least 2-5 years of real-world business experience. The exception would be someone who discovered a revolutionary new finance theory as an undergrad. A few exceptional students with high GMAT scores and grades from top-flight undergrad programs may be considered without work experience. Assuming that the OP didn't, I'd suggest that s/he focus on getting a job or creating a viable business opportunity and then apply to MBA programs.

If the OP just really wants an MBA degree, there are plenty of programs that will accept folks out of undergrad. However, since around the time I graduated from undergrad, MBA degrees have been handed out like candy to the point where MBAs are a dime a dozen out there. The skills learned in most all of those programs is valuable but if the OP is seeking that corner office in a Fortune 500 company, nothing outside an MBA from a Top 15 program will do.

Ditto that. You need real world experience to get in. The more unusual or special that experience is, the better. See if you can get a job running the Marshall Islands branch of a major business, or take over the business end of a fishing venture in Alaska. If you are just yet another flunky worker with yet another undergraduate business degree, you will nto stand out.


I do know a few people who have gotten tino Michigan on grades, test scores and recommendations alone - with no work experience. However grades means 4.0 plain and simple, or 4.5 from one of the grade inflation schools. Top test scroes and a recoomendation from someone at least moderately famous.

I do no thtink that is matters a whole lot whether you go to U-M Dearborn or even WSU as long as you get straight A grades, have awesome test scores and some interesting work experience. It woudl help if you have some major charity work as well. Volunteer to be the business manager for a local non-profit or two once you get that neat job in the Marshall Islands or someowhere.

the reaons I suggest an oddball place like the Marshall islands is that is where a newbie has a chance to get a job with some acutaul authority and a chance to make an impression. Carrying presentation boards for someone in New York for two years is not going to help much in getting admitted.
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Old 07-24-2010, 08:47 AM
 
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I appreciate the comments. It's very helpful to receive information from people who seem to have experience themselves.

My largest concern about entering the workforce after completing my four year degree, is that it would mean I would have to enter into repayment for my student loans. This would make it very hard to continue my education.

I'm slightly shocked to hear that U of M Ann Arbor students are not entitled entrance into the U of M graduate programs (assuming they performed well enough academically). You spend over $100,000 on an education, and devote yourself to a collegiate fascism known as "the college experience", and yet they don't have the decency to save you spot in their graduate studies. Where is the loyalty?

Tuition played a major factor in me deciding not to go to U of M Ann Arbor. I think it's absolutely ridiculous to pay almost $8000 extra a year. It's even more disturbing when you calculate that the increase is solely attributed to a six month rent in the oh so wonderful Ann Arbor (NOT!)
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Old 07-25-2010, 10:00 AM
 
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Quote:
I'm slightly shocked to hear that U of M Ann Arbor students are not entitled entrance into the U of M graduate programs (assuming they performed well enough academically).
It's a competitive program and students from all over the country and around the world want to attend. It's not like they can admit every qualified Michigan grad who wants to go. That's not how graduate school works, sorry to tell you. But if you do well in undergrad you'll have a shot at it like everyone else. As someone else mentioned they may have a Michigan student quota, so it could help that you're from Michigan, but aside from that they can't "save you a spot".
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Old 07-26-2010, 08:42 AM
 
484 posts, read 1,216,594 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ehondo670 View Post
I'm slightly shocked to hear that U of M Ann Arbor students are not entitled entrance into the U of M graduate programs (assuming they performed well enough academically).
Believe it! I got the letter (as opposed to the package everyone wants) from the law school and yes, I am an alum. Some programs (mainly PhD programs) actually don't want their own undergrads; likewise, good universities typically don't like to offer professorships to former students. It's a concept called academic inbreeding.

The state residency requirement only applies to undergraduate programs. Grad programs are under no obligation to have a certain percentage of state residents. Having residency, though, is something to mention in your application materials but it only helps you so far as it benefits the school's desire to have a diverse class. In a class dominated by people from the major urban US population centers, being from backwater Michigan will certainly help. But if it comes down to you and the one guy who grew up in South Dakota, you can kiss the spot good bye. Simply put, the number of students who apply from NYC/CHI/LA > Michigan > South Dakota/Wyoming/other outback states.

Having a UM degree does satisfy the unofficial criteria that some snobbish schools have about only admitting students from peer or better schools. Otherwise, you're just like everyone else who has to hustle to get their spot.

The best advice for getting into UM's MBA program, or any good MBA program, remains the same: unless you happen to put together the next Facebook out of your dorm room during your senior year, you'll need some substantive work experience regardless of school or grades. You can assume that most everyone applying to these programs has 3.5+ GPA in accounting, finance, BBAs, etc. from top-flight programs. The deciding factor is what they have done with it since.
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