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Old 04-05-2011, 03:26 PM
 
528 posts, read 785,160 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tjay View Post
in ortonville....north oakland county, near the south gennese border. my daughter will be 3 in july. i still have time, its just that i'm exhausted now and i don't know how i will squeeze that in too. plus she will still need someone to watch her when i do work?

i saw there was a group in genesse county i plan to email. even if i can't do it, i still plan on being as active as i can with her education.

i just wanted to avoid mixing her with a society that seems to have very low standards in the emotional and health department. i want her to think for herself and not have to deal with kids who are emotionally unstable and their parents don't care. i just hear alot of stories because the majority of clients where i work are teachers. i do think she'll be ok either way, if i am involved. i'm probably just freaking but this 'society' kinda scares me! i also feel that most of her younger years should be with me or family, not strangers. i don't think its natural to send your child off to daycare all day, to be apart most of the day at such a young age. people say they have to be 'socialized' but why in such an extreme way? they need their parents more than they need to be 'socialized'. its not to say you don't ever expose them to social situations, but to me the norm is extreme. i'm rambling.....sorry:}
Sorry so long getting back to you. You know that whole making hay thing...

You're in a larger area, there are probably several homeschool groups out there. There are a lot of ways I've seen single parents make it work, but it takes some networking, and your local groups are a great resource.

I've seen folks make arrangements to swap childcare (so SAHM parents can get a little me time, or date night) and they watch a child that is a good fit with their child so the single parent can work. The kids get to study together. It works especially well for parents who have a single kid, particularly those younger ages where getting to park day regularly (or not at all given the weather) can be a pain, so having another kid there is as much benefit as work (especially if it means a some free babysitting, or a small amount of extra income). It's worth connecting with your local groups. Lots of us are passionate, and those who are closer to the cities understand there are economic realities to be dealt with. You never know what you may find.

There are also "homeschool" co-ops, not sure if they're common here, and usually they cost money and volunteer time, but it's usually way more affordable than private school, and they're more flexible.

I'm happy to offer any suggestions I can, but contact your local group. You never know what may be possible until you check it out.

You're not rambling. Just being a parent.
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Old 04-06-2011, 08:23 AM
 
481 posts, read 855,743 times
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I love the homeschooling movement though all of our three kids went to or are going to public schools. We just didn't explore it and public school has been working out for them but I can see the advantages. My middle child, a brilliant kid in her own right while in the public school, is at a private college with a LOT of kids from homeschool and they are pretty advanced in comparison. They've already got a load of college credits because they were "ahead" in their schooling and were able to take many college courses before actually stepping foot on campus. Great kids too, none of them I've met have had a problem with the socializing thing which society tries to throw out there as the big drawback in this arena. Frankly, from what I've seen in the public schools nowadays (as well as my wife who works there), they aren't missing anything social-wise.
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Old 04-06-2011, 08:41 AM
 
Location: West Michigan
12,083 posts, read 34,986,096 times
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Don't forget though Jimmy that a lot of public schools offer college courses as well. Here in my little town the public school offers college courses for AP courses. I have a friend whose daughter will graduate High School with a 2 year degree already finished and "enter" college as a Junior when she is 18 years old. While she is a bit of the exception, most that take advantage of the program will graduate HS with at least the first year of college done credit wise already. Best part is that it doesn't cost the parents a penny.
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Old 04-06-2011, 09:25 AM
 
481 posts, read 855,743 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bydand View Post
Don't forget though Jimmy that a lot of public schools offer college courses as well. Here in my little town the public school offers college courses for AP courses. I have a friend whose daughter will graduate High School with a 2 year degree already finished and "enter" college as a Junior when she is 18 years old. While she is a bit of the exception, most that take advantage of the program will graduate HS with at least the first year of college done credit wise already. Best part is that it doesn't cost the parents a penny.
I'm not sure how that girl could get that far in only AP classes. We are in a fairly large district and there were only four AP classes which was a max of 12 college credits (typically you need 30 per college year) IF you passed the end of class test. It wasn't free either. We paid about $85 each for the two that my daughter took and the college would only recognize one of them. So, I'm a bit skeptical about the girl you cite...if she is actually in college next year with 60+ credits behind her the moment she starts, THEN I'll believe it. That would have been 20 AP classes offered in high school (at three credits apiece) doing AP work. Not saying it couldn't be done, just skeptical unless she also took JC classes outside of high school.

The college my daughter goes to has a program for homeschooler high school kids where they can take a certain amount of the GenEd requirements before entering so they are guaranteed to transfer.
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Old 04-06-2011, 09:37 AM
 
Location: West Michigan
12,083 posts, read 34,986,096 times
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AP classes here are no extra charge, and while I did say she was a bit of the exception (I think her Mom paid for 1 extra college course a semester), it isn't that unusual for students to graduate with at least their first year completed and part of the second year just from the offerings through the school. Believe it or not, I don't really give a rip. District size is irrelevant, quality of their offerings is what is important. One of the reasons I chose this small (1700 students k-12) School District over the larger ones in the area.
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Old 04-06-2011, 09:59 AM
 
Location: Grosse Ile Michigan
27,776 posts, read 65,700,555 times
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Why would you want your 17 - 18 Y.O. child going to college as a Junior? That would be awful. I feel sorry for that girl. I never understood that parents who brag about putting a 16 or 17 year old kid in college and then even into grad school before they trun 20. That is terrible and sad. Short of abuse, I cannot imagine much worse thing to do to a kid than take away their late high school and early college years and thrust them into the job that they will be stuck in for the next 40 years.

Can kids with loads of AP credits really skip a grade or grades in college? My daughters have a bunch of AP credits, but it did not advance them in college, just allowed them to skip over some of the more basic classes. One daughter does not have to take any math if she does not want to. They still started as freshmen, but they were able to take more classes of their choice becasue they had some requriements out of the way. That is nice. I am glad that they did not have to miss part of college becasue of AP courses. If they will be pushed ahead of their peers, I may suggest tothe my younger kids that they limit the AP classes. I do not want them to miss out on part of college.
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Old 04-06-2011, 10:35 AM
 
Location: West Michigan
12,083 posts, read 34,986,096 times
Reputation: 16907
The AP classes here are all held at the local Community College as regular classes there. The District is small enough that they cannot justify having more Instructors. So the kids who are ready for AP classes get to go out to the CC and take classes there, earning both college credit AND High School credit for the same class. I believe they get to take 3 per semester starting their sophomore year, so at 3 classes per semester @ 3 Credit hours per class that is 9 college credits per semester. 2 semesters during the school year so 18 credits per year for 3 years = 54 total college credits without the parents having to pick up the cost for any of them. One extra class per year or one a summer puts them at 60+ college credit hours at HS graduation.

It is 100% the girls idea and not her Mothers. She has always been an overachiever in school since I have known the family(going on 8 years now). High School classes bore her to tears, so her Mom sees this as the best compromise. Actually one of the most responsible and happy kids I know her age, I hope my own daughter will grow up as decent and nice as this kid... I would prefer that my own daughter NOT be so self-driven though. To jump up and holler borderline abuse without knowing the people involved is mighty narrow minded and judgmental I think, which kind of takes me by surprise Coldjensens. Usually you are more reasonable.
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Old 04-06-2011, 11:04 AM
 
Location: Northwest Lower Michigan
271 posts, read 586,364 times
Reputation: 78
^ My cousin is the same way. She is a junior in a small school with limited offerings and has already done pretty much everything available and is bored. So they let her out after lunch and she goes and takes college courses the 2nd half of the day. Her choice. Every one of her report cards is 4.00. Wish more kids were like her.

I went to the same school when I was younger, wish they did that back then. I was stuck with 3 study halls during the day and pretty much just sat around and did nothing because I had to be there. I wasn't quite a 4.00 but was close.
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