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Old 12-25-2012, 08:44 PM
 
Location: west mich
5,739 posts, read 6,172,034 times
Reputation: 2120

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ram2 View Post
The Toyota truck plant in Texas pays better starting wages than the UAW jobs in Detroit. Tell us how RTW lowers wages?
You've been on this forum a long time and now you demand that I just repeat arguments already made umpteen times.
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Old 12-29-2012, 11:07 AM
 
Location: Yuma
29 posts, read 15,431 times
Reputation: 18
Its fear that is talking, Detroit is a ghost town thanks to unions.
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Old 12-29-2012, 11:26 AM
 
7,519 posts, read 9,343,570 times
Reputation: 13608
Quote:
Originally Posted by umpdog49 View Post
Its fear that is talking, Detroit is a ghost town thanks to unions.
Sorry, but that is simplistic and foolish.

Detroit's problems stem from post World War II, as do the problems of many cities across America. The federal government greatly encouraged and promoted abandonment of cities by subsidizing suburban expansion. Loan and insurance companies engaged in redlining--refusing to provide service within an arbitrary line drawn on a map, hence the name. Federal and state policies promoted highways which destroyed the fabric of many cities and encouraged and enabled people to leave, all on the taxpayer's dime...er...billions and billions of dollars. Federal support for new sewer and water expansions also contributed to the decline. Tax policies and subsidies to developers also caused tremendous problems. There are literally billions upon billions of state and federal dollars which largely caused the decline of Detroit and so many other cities across the country.

Granted, recent city policies have exacerbated Detroit's continued decline, but the overall problem has very deep roots.
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Old 12-29-2012, 12:12 PM
 
Location: State of Superior
8,721 posts, read 14,526,638 times
Reputation: 2839
Quote:
Originally Posted by jackmichigan View Post
Sorry, but that is simplistic and foolish.

Detroit's problems stem from post World War II, as do the problems of many cities across America. The federal government greatly encouraged and promoted abandonment of cities by subsidizing suburban expansion. Loan and insurance companies engaged in redlining--refusing to provide service within an arbitrary line drawn on a map, hence the name. Federal and state policies promoted highways which destroyed the fabric of many cities and encouraged and enabled people to leave, all on the taxpayer's dime...er...billions and billions of dollars. Federal support for new sewer and water expansions also contributed to the decline. Tax policies and subsidies to developers also caused tremendous problems. There are literally billions upon billions of state and federal dollars which largely caused the decline of Detroit and so many other cities across the country.

Granted, recent city policies have exacerbated Detroit's continued decline, but the overall problem has very deep roots.
Good way to describe Detroit these days ( I mean the last 40 years ). History shows us that Detroit was the Auto Capital of the World once. All the remaining car companies want to be there. Many moved from other locations for their headquarters. Having Canada close by also was a plus, with the free trade exchange policy's for all the Car Factories.As time went by, things started to change, Detroit did not change with it. If Detroit has any problem at all, its that its a city thats had is heyday. It should be a smaller place, but they act like everything should remain as was. If you include the burbs( a must these days, Sterling Hts. is Michigan's second city ) Michigan 's south east population has a lot of tallent, more than any other place in the world, when it comes to building Cars .
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