U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Michigan
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-15-2022, 12:22 PM
 
42 posts, read 215,264 times
Reputation: 45

Advertisements

I know it snows A LOT up there, and theres not much industry to speak of. I'm curious if anyone can shed light on other reasons why its still so cheap there, basically things an outsider would miss most of the time.

Currently watching prices between the U.P, Vermont, and Maine. VT is hovering around $5-7k/acre whereas even just outside of Marquette, one can buy 40 acres for nearly $1000/acre. Anyway, thats a big difference, wondering what the catch(es) is/are.

I know the UP is more remote than Vermont, and Vermont gets more city dwellers going up for the maples and the skiing. Any other points i'm missing?

It does look lovely in the UP and I definitely want to visit. Reminds me of parts of the PNW to a degree, but at a fraction of the price.

Anybody?

Thanks in advance!
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-16-2022, 04:58 AM
 
Location: Louisville
4,931 posts, read 5,082,240 times
Reputation: 8823
It's really just a matter of supply and demand. The UP may be the most remote/hard to access region east of the Mississippi. The folks that live up there by and large prefer it that way. I often wonder what the UP would be like now if it had stayed a part of Wisconsin, as Wisconsin tends to be more strategic and maintaining it's smaller population centers than Michigan. Definitely better at attracting investment to them.

To give you an idea, Vermont has about 630k, people in 9,200 sq mi. The UP has 300k people in about 16,500 sq mi. Vermont has a few interstates with direct connections to major cities. The UP has one interstate segment in the far east portion. Burlington, Vermont's largest city is still a 3 hour drive to Boston or Albany. It is less than 100 miles to Montreal. The nearest major city to Marquette is Milwaukee at an almost 5 hour drive.

The UP really only gets about 12 good weeks of summer weather and the wind down period is pretty quick. Lake Superior is COLD and it has a pretty significant impact on the climate. There's not a lot of economic opportunity, and it's been suffering population attrition for decades. It's definitely beautiful, but it takes a specific personality type to want to live in those types of circumstances year round. Because of this there's just not a huge market to take up available land, hence the people who want to sell it need to sell it cheap.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-16-2022, 08:40 PM
 
8,301 posts, read 11,006,633 times
Reputation: 15734
Land prices have jumped everywhere in Michigan in the last few years so I don't really view U.P. land as being that cheap anymore--but I remember when you could pick up land in the U.P. for $100/acre. Although $1,000/acre is still a pretty good price, I see lots of acreage parcels in upstate New York, Kentucky and other areas where you can buy recreational land for about $1,000/acre. If you look in northern Maine, you'll find a lot of land offered at about $1,000/acre, too. Of course, you can find even cheaper land in the arid west where water is rather hard to come by. Nevada still has some really cheap land...but you get what you pay for.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-17-2022, 11:22 AM
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
22,579 posts, read 29,167,965 times
Reputation: 62483
Quote:
Originally Posted by mjlo View Post
It's really just a matter of supply and demand. The UP may be the most remote/hard to access region east of the Mississippi. The folks that live up there by and large prefer it that way. I often wonder what the UP would be like now if it had stayed a part of Wisconsin, as Wisconsin tends to be more strategic and maintaining it's smaller population centers than Michigan. Definitely better at attracting investment to them.

To give you an idea, Vermont has about 630k, people in 9,200 sq mi. The UP has 300k people in about 16,500 sq mi. Vermont has a few interstates with direct connections to major cities. The UP has one interstate segment in the far east portion. Burlington, Vermont's largest city is still a 3 hour drive to Boston or Albany. It is less than 100 miles to Montreal. The nearest major city to Marquette is Milwaukee at an almost 5 hour drive.

The UP really only gets about 12 good weeks of summer weather and the wind down period is pretty quick. Lake Superior is COLD and it has a pretty significant impact on the climate. There's not a lot of economic opportunity, and it's been suffering population attrition for decades. It's definitely beautiful, but it takes a specific personality type to want to live in those types of circumstances year round. Because of this there's just not a huge market to take up available land, hence the people who want to sell it need to sell it cheap.

The wilds of Maine may be even less expensive. Why? Again, you get your rustic, rural land. You get privacy. In Maine, you may even be able to live off the grid.

However, this is what you do not get -

1. airports that will take you directly to your destination. Or perhaps airports within driving distance.

2. Good medical care. Research hospitals.

3. Visitors from out of town.

4. Community - I don't mean a densely populated area, I mean just OTHER PEOPLE.

5. Culture, art, theatre, shopping. universities that have speakers, plays, classes etc.

6. Restaurants with interesting foods.

7. Much of a summer.

I am certain that these things are not all that important to you. I really do appreciate nature and enjoy the outdoors. I don't think I could live in that kind of place.

Since many people would find that lifestyle difficult, there is less of a demand to live in the upper peninsula than, say, Grosse Pointe or Ann Arbor.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-17-2022, 11:55 AM
 
Location: Wisco Disco
1,336 posts, read 572,192 times
Reputation: 1994
Mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm.....venison
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-17-2022, 12:32 PM
 
Location: Floyd County, IN
24,689 posts, read 42,416,191 times
Reputation: 17323
The land prices are undervalued considering the very impending water shortage disaster in other areas of the country.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-17-2022, 02:59 PM
 
42 posts, read 215,264 times
Reputation: 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
The land prices are undervalued considering the very impending water shortage disaster in other areas of the country.
Good point, and one that we are cognizant of. Currently we are in AZ so we know all about the water situation here. That IS a bonus for the U.P.. Id be curious to see how things pan out next 10 or 20 years. I'm also curious if this big trend of sunbelt migration will actually do a 180 turn and things like water and forest will be beneficial to more and more people. Kind of like how summers here in Phoenix are just hotter, for longer, year after year, i.e. number of days over 100/year.

With what research we have done so far, I think drawbacks for us for the U.P. are growing season, soil, long term living... Like having to plow 1/2 a mile of our road just to get out, all the time. I HAVE seen property with year round access listed.

I too have lived in remote places, might like the U.P., hoping to get up there to see sooner than later.

Thanks for all the input everyone!
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-18-2022, 07:35 AM
 
Location: Raleigh
13,003 posts, read 10,303,355 times
Reputation: 18804
Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
The land prices are undervalued considering the very impending water shortage disaster in other areas of the country.
...But that ignores that a lot of that land is a little swampy in the present.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-18-2022, 09:39 AM
 
Location: Grosse Ile Michigan
30,253 posts, read 74,301,245 times
Reputation: 38246
No - jobs, sewers, hospitals, power, schools, water, stores, trash collection, police, lawn services, ambulance, pizza delivery, shopping malls, bars, movie theaters, cable TV, internet service, art museums, zoos that have panda bears, jazz clubs, professional sports, major airports, home depot, lifeguards, animal control officers, veterinarians, marijuana stores. . . .


You have to be well organized and make sure to take care of everything you need or might need on each trip to the nearest town. You need to be prepared to be snowed in for weeks or even months during the winters. You will need a well, a generator, satellite dish, septic field and tank, fireplace and a pile of split logs (3 or 4 cords or more), radio, snowmobile or a horse, rifle, 4x4 truck or jeep. There is property close to a few of the significant cities like Marquette, but not much available and not that cheap. When it is that cheap, there is something wrong with the property (swampy, no perk, no water, floods, easements, environmental restrictions, etc. ). You have to get out away form anything to get good land for that price.

I took my son to a hospital up there because he got a fish hook deeply embedded in his hand and the guy literally went and got a pair of pliers out of his tackle box in his truck. (He did get the hook out and stitched him up nicely, but it was a panicked moment when the guy ran out to his truck, came back with a tackle box and pulled out a pair of dirty pliers.) We had to drive a long way and then wait two hours for them to open (so we went for a hike and then to some yard sales with a fishing lure stuck in his hand).

It is a cool lifestyle, but not appealing to very many people. Heck, look at the way people in suburbs complain online at the slightest inconveniences. No way they are going to move out to the wilderness with no big brother to take care of them and tell them what to do.

It is all about supply and demand. Not much demand and a lot of supply.

I was looking at a 200 acre parcel that was $200,000. It included most of a small lake. However the 10.5 hour drive from our house was daunting. There was a small airport nearby (still at least 10 miles away and no real roads), and one near our house, but the cost of buying and maintaining a plane is huge (and you cannot always use it). I looked at maybe a seaplane that could land on the lake or a ski plan for winter landings, but it was not practical (way too expensive and only usable in certain conditions). Maybe if I could afford a helicopter and training to fly one.

You also have to keep in mind that a piece of property may appear to be very near a city on a map, but to get there on passable roads, could require a very circuitous route. Sometimes there are not roads passable for normal vehicles. Also a lot of the land up there is contaminated or cleared/destroyed from mining or logging operations.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-18-2022, 10:18 AM
 
7,055 posts, read 8,709,401 times
Reputation: 4462
Check out the Houghton/Hancock area of the U.P. With Michigan Tech University in town, you can find many of the amenities found in other cities.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Settings
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2020 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Michigan

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2022, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top