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Old 05-25-2010, 01:53 PM
 
63 posts, read 170,613 times
Reputation: 21

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I was wondering what you guys thought about the new retirement bill Granholm passed for trying to get older teachers to retire. I moved out of state a year ago because I gave up on trying to get a teaching job in Michigan. I have heard that as many as 60,000 school employees will be able to take advantage of the new bill if they choose to. Has anyone heard what and how schools are reacting to the bill? Are people going to retire early and will that create a significant amount of teaching jobs or is it all just words that will prove to be little more then that?
Thanks
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Old 05-25-2010, 02:11 PM
 
Location: Motown
323 posts, read 1,030,818 times
Reputation: 198
I bet there will be a number of older teachers who "take advantage" of the reform and retire - though from what I've read it doesn't seem like it's that great of a deal. It's not like a traditional severance package or anything.
That said, we'll have to see how many teaching jobs actually open up. It's looking like within the next couple of years many of the school districts that aren't already will at that point be up sh** creek without a paddle. I doubt they'll replace all the older teachers that leave.
It would be positive to see Michigan retain some of its college of education graduates by opening up jobs for them, but the rate of pay will be very low. Unfortunately, there aren't too many other states with a hiring excess for teachers either!
When you see the average salaries of Michigan teachers reported to be between $50-55K a year, that is including the teachers who have been around for 30+ years, whose pay rates increased each time they furthered their education. Starting teaching salaries in Michigan aren't all that high and will be getting lower. From what I've read with this reform, new teachers in Michigan won't be eligible for pensions until they are 60. Not real great for attracting quality people into such an important profession - our FUTURE?! HELLO!
Meanwhile, the fat cats in Lansing are getting fatter. It's all a very not funny joke.
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Old 05-25-2010, 02:19 PM
 
Location: Loving life in Gaylord!
4,121 posts, read 8,072,091 times
Reputation: 3906
Quote:
Originally Posted by electric_lady View Post
I bet there will be a number of older teachers who "take advantage" of the reform and retire - though from what I've read it doesn't seem like it's that great of a deal. It's not like a traditional severance package or anything.
That said, we'll have to see how many teaching jobs actually open up. It's looking like within the next couple of years many of the school districts that aren't already will at that point be up sh** creek without a paddle. I doubt they'll replace all the older teachers that leave.
It would be positive to see Michigan retain some of its college of education graduates by opening up jobs for them, but the rate of pay will be very low. Unfortunately, there aren't too many other states with a hiring excess for teachers either!
When you see the average salaries of Michigan teachers reported to be between $50-55K a year, that is including the teachers who have been around for 30+ years, whose pay rates increased each time they furthered their education. Starting teaching salaries in Michigan aren't all that high and will be getting lower. From what I've read with this reform, new teachers in Michigan won't be eligible for pensions until they are 60. Not real great for attracting quality people into such an important profession - our FUTURE?! HELLO!
Meanwhile, the fat cats in Lansing are getting fatter. It's all a very not funny joke.
50-$55k a year is a good salary in Michigan, especially if the spouse works also... if you ask me.
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Old 05-25-2010, 02:28 PM
 
Location: Motown
323 posts, read 1,030,818 times
Reputation: 198
Oh, it's a very good salary in Michigan!

I was just saying that that's not the salary that new hires would be making in Michigan.

That's the average salary of all teachers, including the ones who make $70K and the ones who make $33K.
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Old 05-25-2010, 03:11 PM
 
Location: NE philadelphia
550 posts, read 1,899,406 times
Reputation: 206
The early retirement will help school districts retain the teachers they have now without having to issue pink slips like MANY districts in michigan are now.

Michigan's teaching salaries are low compared to other states-I am from michigan, certified in michigan and teach out of state now.....i didn't want to fight with getting pink slipped year after year if i had been lucky to even get a job....

50,000 is a nice salary, but that is after many years of service and additional education above an undergraduate degree and special certification testing. Most other professional careers with that level of experience and education would be getting paid more....that is all, just my two cents........
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Old 05-26-2010, 07:27 AM
 
63 posts, read 170,613 times
Reputation: 21
Any site I have ever looked at has Michigan as the 4th highest paid sate for teachers. New teachers in Mich usually start in the high 30's to low 40's depending on what part of the state. My sister and I both moved out of the state to teach, I started in low 30's she stated in high 20's. Those numbers are horrible but not even the lowest. Plus as the more you teach in Michigan your salary climbs alot faster then in most states. I would take the beginning salary and move back in a heart beat if I could get a teaching job there.
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Old 05-26-2010, 01:28 PM
 
Location: Detroit suburbs
183 posts, read 288,450 times
Reputation: 257
I have never understood the logic of this. Get rid of teachers with years of experience and in the trenches knowledge, just to hire kids at low pay. I'm glad if it opens up some teaching jobs but exactly how does this save money? Instead of paying one teacher you are now paying one's retirement and benefits and another's salary and benefits. They are trying this at the auto companies and all levels of government. How in the hell can they afford the sweetened pensions/benefits and the new employees? Is this some kind of rob Peter to pay Paul later on?
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Old 05-26-2010, 04:44 PM
 
8,743 posts, read 10,641,798 times
Reputation: 3392
I go to school in Michigan. I was going for education but now I am sooo glad I left education and went for business instead.
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