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Old 01-31-2024, 11:17 AM
 
Location: San Diego CA
8,478 posts, read 6,880,671 times
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Wonder what living conditions are for junior enlisted Navy people now. We did the USS Midway tour over the weekend. Those little cubby hole racks stacked three high look incredibly uncomfortable. Midway was last operational in the 90’s so I guess what we saw was from that era.
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Old 01-31-2024, 11:48 AM
 
12,104 posts, read 23,266,362 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SanJuanStar View Post
Well the Navy was giving support to the land forces in Vietnam with aerial bombings, surveillance, surface interdiction of supplies along the coastline and inland waterways, gunfire support, and humanitarian aid.


That wasn't the only war the U.S. was fighting in the world. There was a thing called the Cold War and the Navy needed to fill the fleet demands to counter the Soviet Nuclear threat.


If you didn't want to fight in the jungles of Vietnam, the Navy and Air Force and even Coast Guard were excellent choices but We were still fighting the Cold War and being in the Fleet or Submarine service is no walk in the park.
20-some Seabee battalions served as well. The first Naval MoH from the war in Vietnam went to a Seabee. My dad was wounded as a member of a Seabee battalion.
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Old 01-31-2024, 01:43 PM
 
Location: Wartrace,TN
8,051 posts, read 12,764,996 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by USNRET04 View Post
Different era.

Now they are letting in people who only need a 50 on ASVAB. The Navy is very advanced. While we still need people to do the menial jobs, lower standards from this current generation, means trouble.

What's next felons?
The paint ain't going to chip itself.........
I was never in the Navy but it seems to me these recruits could be put to work doing more of the menial tasks in the fleet.
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Old 01-31-2024, 06:41 PM
 
Location: Honolulu, HI
24,600 posts, read 9,440,677 times
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The army tried this then had to reverse course due to public backlash.

I don’t care about the navy, and would never recommend anyone to join it. The uniforms are very silly but they do have some amazing bases, ports, and assignments. Thailand, Japan, Singapore, etc.

I did my time in the air force and now I would recommend the space force.
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Old 01-31-2024, 07:35 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
37,444 posts, read 61,360,276 times
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In my specific NEC [job code] my ASVAB score had to be extremely high or simply ace the test to qualify to get the job, [during my career a number of times I was ridiculed for being the only person in my division that failed to ace the ASVAB, as I had missed one question], and then my pipeline schooling took nearly two years to complete before I reached the fleet. Because we were seen as unique there is a certain 'prima donna' attitude that develops.

When our numbers begin to drop the Navy increases our Re-enlistment bonus pay [SRB]. This works to encourage sailors with these NECs to Re-enlist. During most of my career my SRB pay was $65,000 every four years, and assuming that the sailor is currently drawing combat pay, then all of the SRB cash will also be tax-exempted. The year I retired the SRB for my various NECs was increased to $90,000 for each four year Re-enlistment.

Each branch of the military has its own distinct worldview and feel.

Navy bases focus on supporting vessels. Navy bases I have been homeported at, foremost must have a long row of piers. Then warehouses. The base itself is its own separate command, then there may be hundreds of tenant commands, each with offices in the warehouses. Tenant commands may come and go over the years, so a warehouse that was used as a commissary last year might be used as a bar the next year, or as a machine shop that repairs shipboard equipment.

Often there will be a few barracks for the single sailors, but it is rare to see the capacity of barracks more than enough for 50% of the single sailors. All others are expected to go into town and lease an apartment or buy a house. If a sailor has a wife and family those are seen as the sailor's responsibility, just keep them off-base and do not talk about them or bring their problems to work.

A row of piers, then five or six rows of warehouses, barracks, and the perimeter fence. The only reason for any recreational fields is if there are fuel tanks buried in place such that no warehouses can be built on those sites.

Fortunately the Navy is eager to pay us extra pays and allowances to cover the expenses of feeding and housing ourselves.

I have owned an assortment of apartments at different duty stations, and most of our tenants have been other servicembers's families.

We have had a few Air Force tenants, we were shocked at how difficult it is to get the extra pays for food and housing from the Air Force. Whereas in the Navy if you not being paid the extras you would be seen as unusual.

The Air Force has beautiful bases, with lots of recreational fields, gyms, movie theaters, swimming pools, and often an elementary school and hospital. They try to make life on-base to be all-inclusive.

From my observation, the lifestyle of the servicemember is much nicer in the Air Force, than in the Navy.
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Old 02-01-2024, 12:56 AM
 
13,441 posts, read 4,283,969 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rocko20 View Post
The army tried this then had to reverse course due to public backlash.

I don’t care about the navy, and would never recommend anyone to join it. The uniforms are very silly but they do have some amazing bases, ports, and assignments. Thailand, Japan, Singapore, etc.

I did my time in the air force and now I would recommend the space force.

The Army has the lowest standard of all the branches to join because they have the biggest branch and you have to add the National Guard and their Reserves that the Army handles and they have to fill them.



Why would an Air Force person know about the Naval life? They wouldn't last 1 week in the Fleet let alone in Submarine service.



If people join the military for the uniform, everybody would join the U.S. Marines and I think the Navy uniforms look at lot better than the Air Force especially the Officers and E-7 and above. The whites and blues with the anchors on the cap, and the Gold Wings, Seal Trident, Submarine badges look sharp. I like the Khakis with the brown leather shoes which the officers and Chiefs were for the Naval Air platform that they wear for daily work. I was in flight suits most of the time but the job is what makes the Navy great or suck for you.



I was a sub hunter in the P-3 Orion Squadrons. I was a sonar/radar operator. During the Cold War, We were busy since the Soviets had a big fleet and a lot of nuclear subs. It was the most important job in my life. I had mates that served on the S-3 Vikings and Helos so they served on carriers. P-3 were land base deployments. The Navy spent a lot of resources in the anti-submarine platform from air, sea and under because a nuclear submarine was the #1 threat to the fleet and could have come undetected close to the U.S., launch nuclear missiles and leave undetected. The U.S. spent a lot of resources with underwater sonar technology and facilities around the world to track their subs. You have the anti-submarines platforms on the air, boats and submarines searching their subs. All the parts work together. It was humbling to watch and be a part of that. A lot of professionals in the military. I haven't been to a unit in the civilian world as tight and have attention to details than my time in the Navy.


Would I recommend the Navy? Of course but it depends on the person and what platform they are going for. The military is not for everybody.
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Old 02-01-2024, 04:14 PM
 
17,603 posts, read 17,635,928 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SanJuanStar View Post
The Army has the lowest standard of all the branches to join because they have the biggest branch and you have to add the National Guard and their Reserves that the Army handles and they have to fill them.



Why would an Air Force person know about the Naval life? They wouldn't last 1 week in the Fleet let alone in Submarine service.



If people join the military for the uniform, everybody would join the U.S. Marines and I think the Navy uniforms look at lot better than the Air Force especially the Officers and E-7 and above. The whites and blues with the anchors on the cap, and the Gold Wings, Seal Trident, Submarine badges look sharp. I like the Khakis with the brown leather shoes which the officers and Chiefs were for the Naval Air platform that they wear for daily work. I was in flight suits most of the time but the job is what makes the Navy great or suck for you.



I was a sub hunter in the P-3 Orion Squadrons. I was a sonar/radar operator. During the Cold War, We were busy since the Soviets had a big fleet and a lot of nuclear subs. It was the most important job in my life. I had mates that served on the S-3 Vikings and Helos so they served on carriers. P-3 were land base deployments. The Navy spent a lot of resources in the anti-submarine platform from air, sea and under because a nuclear submarine was the #1 threat to the fleet and could have come undetected close to the U.S., launch nuclear missiles and leave undetected. The U.S. spent a lot of resources with underwater sonar technology and facilities around the world to track their subs. You have the anti-submarines platforms on the air, boats and submarines searching their subs. All the parts work together. It was humbling to watch and be a part of that. A lot of professionals in the military. I haven't been to a unit in the civilian world as tight and have attention to details than my time in the Navy.


Would I recommend the Navy? Of course but it depends on the person and what platform they are going for. The military is not for everybody.
In the mid90s the USS LaSalle AGF-3 held a joint operation with generals from the Army, Marines, and Air Force on the ship along with their enlisted staff. The Army and Marine guys had no problem. The Air Force guys had culture shock. “Only one TV?”, “is this all the storage you get?”, “this is a bed?”, “where do you keep your stereo and video game system?”, “when will the ship stop moving?” were all things they were asking. The Air Force guys ended up seasick in their racks while we were still tied to the pier in Gaeta Italy in calm weather. Things got worse for them when we left port.
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Old 02-01-2024, 10:59 PM
 
13,441 posts, read 4,283,969 times
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Originally Posted by victimofGM View Post
In the mid90s the USS LaSalle AGF-3 held a joint operation with generals from the Army, Marines, and Air Force on the ship along with their enlisted staff. The Army and Marine guys had no problem. The Air Force guys had culture shock. “Only one TV?”, “is this all the storage you get?”, “this is a bed?”, “where do you keep your stereo and video game system?”, “when will the ship stop moving?” were all things they were asking. The Air Force guys ended up seasick in their racks while we were still tied to the pier in Gaeta Italy in calm weather. Things got worse for them when we left port.

The Fleet life is no joke and the submarine life harder. I was land base but the best platform in the carriers were the Naval Air Squadrons because they are the last to arrive before it goes at sea on deployment and the first ones off the boat when they comeback back to their land base squadrons. The boat doesn't have to make it back to dock, they all take off to their bases. The rest stay because its a 24/7 to run and maintain those boats. They work hard. It's rough and some rates rougher than others. I met sailors in the fleet that went awol, they didn't want to go back.



I have been to Air Force bases and they are nice. Different communities. All branches are military and share things in common but each one has their own culture. Even within the branch they have different cultures.
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Old 02-01-2024, 11:19 PM
NCN
 
Location: NC/SC Border Patrol
21,662 posts, read 25,620,272 times
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Navy standards have already been lowered by equity instead of quality. Nothing wrong with taking school dropouts. That went on for years. Best thing that ever happened to those who needed structure.

A chain is only strong as its weakest link. The military is only as strong as its weakest enlistee. I personally think we need the draft back. That would take away the "us and them" attitude. That would make everybody equal.
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Old 02-02-2024, 12:09 AM
 
13,441 posts, read 4,283,969 times
Reputation: 5388
Is not like the HS dropouts will be put in position of leadership or command when they enter. They will start at the bottom and they will be molded in the military structure. They will get plenty of school, training and good role models around them 24/7 in the military.


Navy believes they have a better shot in giving these kids a structure and purpose than the public school system and broken homes that they come from. I like it. If it doesn't work out, they will be discharge but when the civilian world fails, the military could fill in the gaps with discipline, working well with others and giving them a purpose with a solid structure.


I support this if taken a small % first and let them blend in with the rest.
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